Dubliners by James Joyce
And

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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[The Sisters] [4] Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and
[The Sisters] [5] studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had
[The Sisters] [6] found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was
[The Sisters] [10] world," and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were
[The Sisters] [13] ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in
[The Sisters] [15] maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed
[The Sisters] [16] to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.
[The Sisters] [28] rather interesting, talking of faints and worms; but I soon grew
[The Sisters] [29] tired of him and his endless stories about the distillery.
[The Sisters] [35] uncle saw me staring and said to me:
[The Sisters] [50] "The youngster and he were great friends. The old chap taught him
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [57] looking up from my plate. He returned to his pipe and finally spat
[The Sisters] [66] let a young lad run about and play with young lads of his own age
[The Sisters] [67] and not be... Am I right, Jack?"
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [73] now. Education is all very fine and large.... Mr. Cotter might take a
[The Sisters] [78] My aunt brought the dish from the safe and put it on the table.
[The Sisters] [94] blankets over my head and tried to think of Christmas. But the grey
[The Sisters] [95] face still followed me. It murmured, and I understood that it
[The Sisters] [97] pleasant and vicious region; and there again I found it waiting for
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [99] wondered why it smiled continually and why the lips were so
[The Sisters] [101] paralysis and I felt that I too was smiling feebly as if to absolve the
[The Sisters] [107] consisted mainly of children's bootees and umbrellas; and on
[The Sisters] [111] Two poor women and a telegram boy were reading the card pinned
[The Sisters] [112] on the crape. I also approached and read:
[The Sisters] [119] The reading of the card persuaded me that he was dead and I was
[The Sisters] [124] Toast for him and this present would have roused him from his
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [140] mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a
[The Sisters] [144] college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin
[The Sisters] [145] properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about
[The Sisters] [146] Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of
[The Sisters] [147] the different ceremonies of the Mass and of the different vestments
[The Sisters] [150] circumstances or whether such and such sins were mortal or venial
[The Sisters] [151] or only imperfections. His questions showed me how complex and
[The Sisters] [154] towards the Eucharist and towards the secrecy of the confessional
[The Sisters] [156] found in himself the courage to undertake them; and I was not
[The Sisters] [158] written books as thick as the Post Office Directory and as closely
[The Sisters] [161] answer or only a very foolish and halting one upon which he used
[The Sisters] [162] to smile and nod his head twice or thrice. Sometimes he used to
[The Sisters] [164] learn by heart; and, as I pattered, he used to smile pensively and
[The Sisters] [165] nod his head, now and then pushing huge pinches of snuff up each
[The Sisters] [167] discoloured teeth and let his tongue lie upon his lower lip--a habit
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[The Sisters] [173] remembered that I had noticed long velvet curtains and a swinging
[The Sisters] [181] clouds. Nannie received us in the hall; and, as it would have been
[The Sisters] [183] all. The old woman pointed upwards interrogatively and, on my
[The Sisters] [186] At the first landing she stopped and beckoned us forward
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [194] and we three knelt down at the foot of the bed. I pretended to pray
[The Sisters] [197] hooked at the back and how the heels of her cloth boots were
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [202] that he was not smiling. There he lay, solemn and copious, vested
[The Sisters] [204] was very truculent, grey and massive, with black cavernous
[The Sisters] [205] nostrils and circled by a scanty white fur. There was a heavy odour
[The Sisters] [208] We crossed ourselves and came away. In the little room downstairs
[The Sisters] [211] sideboard and brought out a decanter of sherry and some
[The Sisters] [212] wine-glasses. She set these on the table and invited us to take a
[The Sisters] [214] sherry into the glasses and passed them to us. She pressed me to
[The Sisters] [217] somewhat disappointed at my refusal and went over quietly to the
[The Sisters] [221] My aunt waited until Eliza sighed and then said:
[The Sisters] [225] Eliza sighed again and bowed her head in assent. My aunt fingered
[The Sisters] [234] "And everything...?"
[The Sisters] [236] "Father O'Rourke was in with him a Tuesday and anointed him and
[The Sisters] [237] prepared him and all."
[The Sisters] [246] just looked as if he was asleep, he looked that peaceful and
[The Sisters] [251] She sipped a little more from her glass and said:
[The Sisters] [263] Nannie had leaned her head against the sofa-pillow and seemed
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [268] him and then laying him out and then the coffin and then arranging
[The Sisters] [271] and them two candlesticks out of the chapel and wrote out the
[The Sisters] [272] notice for the Freeman's General and took charge of all the papers
[The Sisters] [273] for the cemetery and poor James's insurance."
[The Sisters] [277] Eliza closed her eyes and shook her head slowly.
[The Sisters] [280] said and done, no friends that a body can trust."
[The Sisters] [282] "Indeed, that's true," said my aunt. "And I'm sure now that he's
[The Sisters] [283] gone to his eternal reward he won't forget you and all your
[The Sisters] [288] he's gone and all to that...."
[The Sisters] [296] She stopped, as if she were communing with the past and then said
[The Sisters] [301] with his breviary fallen to the floor, lying back in the chair and his
[The Sisters] [304] She laid a finger against her nose and frowned: then she continued:
[The Sisters] [306] "But still and all he kept on saying that before the summer was
[The Sisters] [308] again where we were all born down in Irishtown and take me and
[The Sisters] [312] Johnny Rush's over the way there and drive out the three of us
[The Sisters] [318] Eliza took out her handkerchief and wiped her eyes with it. Then
[The Sisters] [319] she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate
[The Sisters] [323] priesthood was too much for him. And then his life was, you might
[The Sisters] [329] A silence took possession of the little room and, under cover of it,
[The Sisters] [330] I approached the table and tasted my sherry and then returned
[The Sisters] [333] and after a long pause she said slowly:
[The Sisters] [340] "And was that it?" said my aunt. "I heard something...."
[The Sisters] [345] himself, talking to no one and wandering about by himself. So one
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [347] anywhere. They looked high up and low down; and still they
[The Sisters] [349] to try the chapel. So then they got the keys and opened the chapel
[The Sisters] [350] and the clerk and Father O'Rourke and another priest that was
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[The Sisters] [353] confession-box, wide- awake and laughing-like softly to himself?"
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[The Sisters] [362] "Wide-awake and laughing-like to himself.... So then, of course,
[An Encounter] [370] and The Halfpenny Marvel . Every evening after school we met in
[An Encounter] [371] his back garden and arranged Indian battles. He and his fat young
[An Encounter] [374] however well we fought, we never won siege or battle and all our
[An Encounter] [376] went to eight- o'clock mass every morning in Gardiner Street and
[An Encounter] [378] house. But he played too fiercely for us who were younger and
[An Encounter] [381] tin with his fist and yelling:
[An Encounter] [388] A spirit of unruliness diffused itself among us and, under its
[An Encounter] [389] influence, differences of culture and constitution were waived. We
[An Encounter] [390] banded ourselves together, some boldly, some in jest and some
[An Encounter] [391] almost in fear: and of the number of these latter, the reluctant
[An Encounter] [396] were traversed from time to time by unkempt fierce and beautiful
[An Encounter] [397] girls. Though there was nothing wrong in these stories and though
[An Encounter] [407] Everyone's heart palpitated as Leo Dillon handed up the paper and
[An Encounter] [420] glory of the Wild West for me and the confused puffy face of Leo
[An Encounter] [432] With Leo Dillon and a boy named Mahony I planned a day's
[An Encounter] [435] an excuse for him and Leo Dillon was to tell his brother to say he
[An Encounter] [437] to the ships, then to cross in the ferryboat and walk out to see the
[An Encounter] [441] were reassured: and I brought the first stage of the plot to an end
[An Encounter] [445] hands, laughing, and Mahony said:
[An Encounter] [451] ashpit at the end of the garden where nobody ever came and
[An Encounter] [455] and watching the docile horses pulling a tramload of business
[An Encounter] [457] mall were gay with little light green leaves and the sunlight slanted
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [463] Mahony's grey suit approaching. He came up the hill, smiling, and
[An Encounter] [465] brought out the catapult which bulged from his inner pocket and
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [468] have some gas with the birds. Mahony used slang freely, and spoke
[An Encounter] [471] last, jumped down and said:
[An Encounter] [475] "And his sixpence...?" I said.
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [478] bob and a tanner instead of a bob."
[An Encounter] [481] Works and then turned to the right along the Wharf Road. Mahony
[An Encounter] [484] and, when two ragged boys began, out of chivalry, to fling stones
[An Encounter] [486] boys were too small and so we walked on, the ragged troop
[An Encounter] [492] by saying what a funk he was and guessing how many he would
[An Encounter] [497] of cranes and engines and often being shouted at for our
[An Encounter] [499] reached the quays and as all the labourers seemed to be eating
[An Encounter] [500] their lunches, we bought two big currant buns and sat down to eat
[An Encounter] [506] right skit to run away to sea on one of those big ships and even I,
[An Encounter] [509] under my eyes. School and home seemed to recede from us and
[An Encounter] [513] transported in the company of two labourers and a little Jew with a
[An Encounter] [515] short voyage our eyes met and we laughed. When we landed we
[An Encounter] [518] Norwegian vessel. I went to the stern and tried to decipher the
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [521] confused notion.... The sailors' eyes were blue and grey and even
[An Encounter] [529] Ringsend. The day had grown sultry, and in the windows of the
[An Encounter] [531] biscuits and chocolate which we ate sedulously as we wandered
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [534] and bought a bottle of raspberry lemonade each. Refreshed by this,
[An Encounter] [536] field. We both felt rather tired and when we reached the field we
[An Encounter] [540] It was too late and we were too tired to carry out our project of
[An Encounter] [543] regretfully at his catapult and I had to suggest going home by train
[An Encounter] [545] clouds and left us to our jaded thoughts and the crumbs of our
[An Encounter] [552] by the bank slowly. He walked with one hand upon his hip and in
[An Encounter] [554] He was shabbily dressed in a suit of greenish-black and wore what
[An Encounter] [557] our feet he glanced up at us quickly and then continued his way.
[An Encounter] [558] We followed him with our eyes and saw that when he had gone on
[An Encounter] [559] for perhaps fifty paces he turned about and began to retrace his
[An Encounter] [564] He stopped when he came level with us and bade us goodday. We
[An Encounter] [565] answered him and he sat down beside us on the slope slowly and
[An Encounter] [567] would be a very hot summer and adding that the seasons had
[An Encounter] [570] days and that he would give anything to be young again. While he
[An Encounter] [572] Then he began to talk of school and of books. He asked us whether
[An Encounter] [574] Walter Scott and Lord Lytton. I pretended that I had read every
[An Encounter] [581] He said he had all Sir Walter Scott's works and all Lord Lytton's
[An Encounter] [582] works at home and never tired of reading them. "Of course," he
[An Encounter] [585] which agitated and pained me because I was afraid the man would
[An Encounter] [590] many I had. I answered that I had none. He did not believe me and
[An Encounter] [596] The man smiled as before and said that when he was our age he
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [604] and I wondered why he shivered once or twice as if he feared
[An Encounter] [607] nice soft hair they had and how soft their hands were and how all
[An Encounter] [610] young girl, at her nice white hands and her beautiful soft hair. He
[An Encounter] [613] speech, his mind was slowly circling round and round in the same
[An Encounter] [615] that everybody knew, and at times he lowered his voice and spoke
[An Encounter] [617] not wish others to overhear. He repeated his phrases over and over
[An Encounter] [618] again, varying them and surrounding them with his monotonous
[An Encounter] [624] and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking
[An Encounter] [636] "In case he asks us for our names," I said "let you be Murphy and I'll
[An Encounter] [640] whether I would go away or not when the man came back and sat
[An Encounter] [642] catching sight of the cat which had escaped him, sprang up and
[An Encounter] [643] pursued her across the field. The man and I watched the chase. The
[An Encounter] [644] cat escaped once more and Mahony began to throw stones at the
[An Encounter] [649] a very rough boy and asked did he get whipped often at school. I
[An Encounter] [653] magnetised again by his speech, seemed to circle slowly round and
[An Encounter] [655] ought to be whipped and well whipped. When a boy was rough and
[An Encounter] [659] at this sentiment and involuntarily glanced up at his face. As I did
[An Encounter] [665] girls or having a girl for a sweetheart he would whip him and whip
[An Encounter] [666] him; and that would teach him not to be talking to girls. And if a
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[An Encounter] [672] better than anything in this world; and his voice, as he led me
[An Encounter] [673] monotonously through the mystery, grew almost affectionate and
[An Encounter] [678] pretending to fix my shoe properly and then, saying that I was
[An Encounter] [681] the ankles. When I reached the top of the slope I turned round and,
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[An Encounter] [688] Mahony saw me and hallooed in answer. How my heart beat as he
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [704] in all the rooms, and the waste room behind the kitchen was
[Araby] [706] paper-covered books, the pages of which were curled and damp:
[Araby] [707] The Abbot, by Walter Scott, The Devout Communnicant and The
[Araby] [710] apple-tree and a few straggling bushes under one of which I found
[Araby] [712] priest; in his will he had left all his money to institutions and the
[Araby] [718] ever-changing violet and towards it the lamps of the street lifted
[Araby] [719] their feeble lanterns. The cold air stung us and we played till our
[Araby] [725] coachman smoothed and combed the horse or shook music from
[Araby] [730] brother in to his tea we watched her from our shadow peer up and
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [735] teased her before he obeyed and I stood by the railings looking at
[Araby] [736] her. Her dress swung as she moved her body and the soft rope of
[Araby] [742] heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I
[Araby] [743] kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near
[Araby] [744] the point at which our ways diverged, I quickened my pace and
[Araby] [746] spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name
[Araby] [752] flaring streets, jostled by drunken men and bargaining women,
[Araby] [759] to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I
[Araby] [761] could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to
[Araby] [765] was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [774] to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip
[Araby] [783] "And why can't you?" I asked.
[Araby] [785] While she spoke she turned a silver bracelet round and round her
[Araby] [787] that week in her convent. Her brother and two other boys were
[Araby] [788] fighting for their caps and I was alone at the railings. She held one
[Araby] [791] her hair that rested there and, falling, lit up the hand upon the
[Araby] [792] railing. It fell over one side of her dress and caught the white
[Araby] [799] What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping
[Araby] [802] my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between
[Araby] [803] me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [806] to the bazaar on Saturday night. My aunt was surprised and hoped
[Araby] [811] serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my
[Araby] [816] for the hat-brush, and answered me curtly:
[Araby] [820] As he was in the hall I could not go into the front parlour and lie at
[Araby] [821] the window. I left the house in bad humour and walked slowly
[Araby] [822] towards the school. The air was pitilessly raw and already my heart
[Araby] [826] Still it was early. I sat staring at the clock for some time and. when
[Araby] [828] staircase and gained the upper part of the house. The high cold
[Araby] [829] empty gloomy rooms liberated me and I went from room to room
[Araby] [831] below in the street. Their cries reached me weakened and
[Araby] [832] indistinct and, leaning my forehead against the cool glass, I looked
[Araby] [836] neck, at the hand upon the railings and at the border below the
[Araby] [843] and still my uncle did not come. Mrs. Mercer stood up to go: she
[Araby] [845] o'clock and she did not like to be out late as the night air was bad
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [852] him talking to himself and heard the hallstand rocking when it had
[Araby] [857] "The people are in bed and after their first sleep now," he said.
[Araby] [861] "Can't you give him the money and let him go? You've kept him
[Araby] [865] believed in the old saying: "All work and no play makes Jack a
[Araby] [866] dull boy." He asked me where I was going and, when I had told
[Araby] [873] buyers and glaring with gas recalled to me the purpose of my
[Araby] [876] slowly. It crept onward among ruinous house and over the
[Araby] [881] improvised wooden platform. I passed out on to the road and saw
[Araby] [885] I could not find any sixpenny entrance and, fearing that the bazaar
[Araby] [889] closed and the greater part of the hall was in darkness. I recognised
[Araby] [898] the stalls and examined porcelain vases and flowered tea- sets. At
[Araby] [899] the door of the stall a young lady was talking and laughing with
[Araby] [900] two young gentlemen. I remarked their English accents and
[Araby] [915] Observing me the young lady came over and asked me did I wish
[Araby] [919] of the dark entrance to the stall and murmured:
[Araby] [923] The young lady changed the position of one of the vases and went
[Araby] [930] away slowly and walked down the middle of the bazaar. I allowed
[Araby] [935] Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and
[Araby] [936] derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.
[Eveline] [941] Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her
[Eveline] [946] pavement and afterwards crunching on the cinder path before the
[Eveline] [949] a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it--not
[Eveline] [953] and her brothers and sisters. Ernest, however, never played: he was
[Eveline] [956] and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to
[Eveline] [957] have been rather happy then. Her father was not so bad then; and
[Eveline] [958] besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and
[Eveline] [959] her brothers and sisters were all grown up her mother was dead.
[Eveline] [960] Tizzie Dunn was dead, too, and the Waters had gone back to
[Eveline] [968] never dreamed of being divided. And yet during all those years she
[Eveline] [980] she had shelter and food; she had those whom she had known all
[Eveline] [982] house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores
[Eveline] [984] was a fool, perhaps; and her place would be filled up by
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1002] threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1004] dead and Harry, who was in the church decorating business, was
[Eveline] [1008] shillings--and Harry always sent up what he could but the trouble
[Eveline] [1011] give her his hard-earned money to throw about the streets, and
[Eveline] [1013] end he would give her the money and ask her had she any intention
[Eveline] [1015] she could and do her marketing, holding her black leather purse
[Eveline] [1016] tightly in her hand as she elbowed her way through the crowds and
[Eveline] [1018] work to keep the house together and to see that the two young
[Eveline] [1020] and got their meals regularly. It was hard work--a hard life--but
[Eveline] [1026] night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres
[Eveline] [1031] and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. Then they had
[Eveline] [1033] every evening and see her home. He took her to see The Bohemian
[Eveline] [1034] Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the
[Eveline] [1035] theatre with him. He was awfully fond of music and sang a little.
[Eveline] [1036] People knew that they were courting and, when he sang about the
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1042] Canada. He told her the names of the ships he had been on and the
[Eveline] [1044] of Magellan and he told her stories of the terrible Patagonians. He
[Eveline] [1045] had fallen on his feet in Buenos Ayres, he said, and had come over
[Eveline] [1047] found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say
[Eveline] [1052] One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to
[Eveline] [1060] been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made
[Eveline] [1073] dark room at the other side of the hall and outside she heard a
[Eveline] [1075] away and given sixpence. She remembered her father strutting
[Eveline] [1094] Wall. He held her hand and she knew that he was speaking to her,
[Eveline] [1095] saying something about the passage over and over again. The
[Eveline] [1099] answered nothing. She felt her cheek pale and cold and, out of a
[Eveline] [1105] distress awoke a nausea in her body and she kept moving her lips
[Eveline] [1123] He rushed beyond the barrier and called to her to follow. He was
[After the Race] [1133] careering homeward and through this channel of poverty and
[After the Race] [1134] inaction the Continent sped its wealth and industry. Now and again
[After the Race] [1140] finished solidly; they had been placed second and third and the
[After the Race] [1143] topped the crest of the hill and each cheer of welcome was
[After the Race] [1144] acknowledged with smiles and nods by those in the car. In one of
[After the Race] [1150] Villona and a neatly groomed young man named Doyle. Segouin
[After the Race] [1153] Paris) and Riviere was in good humour because he was to be
[After the Race] [1157] he had had a very satisfactory luncheon; and besides he was an
[After the Race] [1162] moustache and rather innocent-looking grey eyes. His father, who
[After the Race] [1164] early. He had made his money as a butcher in Kingstown and by
[After the Race] [1165] opening shops in Dublin and in the suburbs he had made his
[After the Race] [1167] secure some of the police contracts and in the end he had become
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[After the Race] [1171] University to study law. Jimmy did not study very earnestly and
[After the Race] [1172] took to bad courses for a while. He had money and he was popular;
[After the Race] [1173] and he divided his time curiously between musical and motoring
[After the Race] [1176] excess, had paid his bills and brought him home. It was at
[After the Race] [1179] society of one who had seen so much of the world and was reputed
[After the Race] [1186] cousins sat on the front seat; Jimmy and his Hungarian friend sat
[After the Race] [1189] flung their laughter and light words over their shoulders and often
[After the Race] [1192] deft guess at the meaning and shout back a suitable answer in the
[After the Race] [1200] had presented him to one of the French competitors and, in answer
[After the Race] [1204] nudges and significant looks. Then as to money--he really had a
[After the Race] [1209] bills within the limits of reasonable recklessness, and if he had
[After the Race] [1215] Of course, the investment was a good one and Segouin had
[After the Race] [1219] business matters and in this case it had been his father who had
[After the Race] [1225] magical finger on the genuine pulse of life and gallantly the
[After the Race] [1230] traffic, loud with the horns of motorists and the gongs of impatient
[After the Race] [1231] tram-drivers. Near the Bank Segouin drew up and Jimmy and his
[After the Race] [1234] that evening in Segouin's hotel and, meanwhile, Jimmy and his
[After the Race] [1244] eagerness, also, to play fast and loose for the names of great
[After the Race] [1246] well when he was dressed and, as he stood in the hall giving a last
[After the Race] [1250] Villona and his manner expressed a real respect for foreign
[After the Race] [1259] candle lamps. They talked volubly and with little reserve. Jimmy,
[After the Race] [1262] Englishman's manner. A graceful image of his, he thought, and a
[After the Race] [1264] the conversation. The five young men had various tastes and their
[After the Race] [1275] hot and Segouin's task grew harder each moment: there was even
[After the Race] [1277] glass to Humanity and, when the toast had been drunk, he threw
[After the Race] [1282] They talked loudly and gaily and their cloaks dangled from their
[After the Race] [1285] a car in charge of another fat man. The car drove off and the short
[After the Race] [1293] very well what the talk was about. Villona and Riviere were the
[After the Race] [1297] bells. They took the train at Westland Row and in a few seconds,
[After the Race] [1309] They got into a rowboat at the slip and made out for the
[After the Race] [1316] Farley and Riviere, Farley acting as cavalier and Riviere as lady.
[After the Race] [1319] seeing life, at least. Then Farley got out of breath and cried "Stop!"
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[After the Race] [1326] speech. Farley clapped him on the back and laughed loudly. What
[After the Race] [1330] piano and played voluntaries for them. The other men played game
[After the Race] [1332] drank the health of the Queen of Hearts and of the Queen of
[After the Race] [1334] was flashing. Play ran very high and paper began to pass. Jimmy
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1339] Someone gave the toast of the yacht The Belle of Newport and
[After the Race] [1344] luck. Jimmy understood that the game lay between Routh and
[After the Race] [1347] feet to play the last tricks. talking and gesticulating. Routh won.
[After the Race] [1348] The cabin shook with the young men's cheering and the cards were
[After the Race] [1350] Farley and Jimmy were the heaviest losers.
[After the Race] [1354] folly. He leaned his elbows on the table and rested his head
[After the Race] [1356] door opened and he saw the Hungarian standing in a shaft of grey
[Two Gallants] [1364] and a mild warm air, a memory of summer, circulated in the
[Two Gallants] [1368] below which, changing shape and hue unceasingly, sent up into the
[Two Gallants] [1373] who walked on the verge of the path and was at times obliged to
[Two Gallants] [1375] amused listening face. He was squat and ruddy. A yachting cap
[Two Gallants] [1376] was shoved far back from his forehead and the narrative to which
[Two Gallants] [1378] face from the corners of his nose and eyes and mouth. Little jets of
[Two Gallants] [1384] and his jauntily slung waterproof expressed youth. But his figure
[Two Gallants] [1385] fell into rotundity at the waist, his hair was scant and grey and his
[Two Gallants] [1394] His voice seemed winnowed of vigour; and to enforce his words he
[Two Gallants] [1397] "That takes the solitary, unique, and, if I may so call it, recherche
[Two Gallants] [1400] He became serious and silent when he had said this. His tongue
[Two Gallants] [1403] leech but, in spite of this reputation, his adroitness and eloquence
[Two Gallants] [1406] them in a bar and of holding himself nimbly at the borders of the
[Two Gallants] [1408] vagrant armed with a vast stock of stories, limericks and riddles.
[Two Gallants] [1413] "And where did you pick her up, Corley?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1417] "One night, man," he said, "I was going along Dame Street and I
[Two Gallants] [1418] spotted a fine tart under Waterhouse's clock and said good- night,
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1421] round her and squeezed her a bit that night. Then next Sunday,
[Two Gallants] [1422] man, I met her by appointment. We vent out to Donnybrook and I
[Two Gallants] [1425] and paying the tram out and back. And one night she brought me
[Two Gallants] [1443] to the roadway and back again. Corley was the son of an inspector
[Two Gallants] [1444] of police and he had inherited his father's frame and gut. He
[Two Gallants] [1445] walked with his hands by his sides, holding himself erect and
[Two Gallants] [1447] and oily; it sweated in all weathers; and his large round hat, set
[Two Gallants] [1450] parade and, when he wished to gaze after someone in the street, it
[Two Gallants] [1455] knew the inner side of all affairs and was fond of delivering final
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1459] and what he had said to settle the matter. When he reported these
[Two Gallants] [1481] "You're what I call a gay Lothario," said Lenehan. "And the proper
[Two Gallants] [1495] tram somewhere and pay the tram or take them to a band or a play
[Two Gallants] [1496] at the theatre or buy them chocolate and sweets or something that
[Two Gallants] [1502] "I know that game," he said, "and it's a mug's game."
[Two Gallants] [1504] "And damn the thing I ever got out of it," said Corley.
[Two Gallants] [1512] the moon, now nearly veiled, and seemed to meditate.
[Two Gallants] [1526] to and fro and smiled.
[Two Gallants] [1537] skipped out into the road and peered up at the clock.
[Two Gallants] [1555] reassurance. Corley swung his head to and fro as if to toss aside an
[Two Gallants] [1556] insistent insect, and his brows gathered.
[Two Gallants] [1561] temper, to be sent to the devil and told that his advice was not
[Two Gallants] [1568] They walked along Nassau Street and then turned into Kildare
[Two Gallants] [1572] each new-comer and from time to time, wearily also, at the sky.
[Two Gallants] [1574] knees, seemed weary alike of the eyes of strangers and of her
[Two Gallants] [1577] group of notes. The notes of the air sounded deep and full.
[Two Gallants] [1581] Green they crossed the road. Here the noise of trams, the lights and
[Two Gallants] [1587] wore a blue dress and a white sailor hat. She stood on the
[Two Gallants] [1592] Corley glanced sideways at his friend and an unpleasant grin
[Two Gallants] [1601] you what. I'll go over and talk to her and you can pass by."
[Two Gallants] [1608] "And after? Where will we meet?"
[Two Gallants] [1619] head from side to side. His bulk, his easy pace, and the solid sound
[Two Gallants] [1621] approached the young woman and, without saluting, began at once
[Two Gallants] [1622] to converse with her. She swung her umbrella more quickly and
[Two Gallants] [1624] her at close quarters she laughed and bent her head.
[Two Gallants] [1627] along beside the chains at some distance and crossed the road
[Two Gallants] [1629] heavily scented and his eyes made a swift anxious scrutiny of the
[Two Gallants] [1634] She wore a short black jacket with mother-of-pearl buttons and a
[Two Gallants] [1636] carefully disordered and a big bunch of red flowers was pinned in
[Two Gallants] [1639] her fat red cheeks and in her unabashed blue eyes. Her features
[Two Gallants] [1641] open in a contented leer, and two projecting front teeth. As he
[Two Gallants] [1642] passed Lenehan took off his cap and, after about ten seconds,
[Two Gallants] [1644] vaguely and pensively changing the angle of position of his hat.
[Two Gallants] [1647] and waited. After waiting for a little time he saw them coming
[Two Gallants] [1648] towards him and, when they turned to the right, he followed them,
[Two Gallants] [1654] Donnybrook tram; then he turned about and went back the way he
[Two Gallants] [1658] forsake him and, as he came by the railings of the Duke's Lawn, he
[Two Gallants] [1664] He walked listlessly round Stephen's Green and then down Grafton
[Two Gallants] [1667] that was meant to charm him and did not answer the glances which
[Two Gallants] [1669] great deal, to invent and to amuse and his brain and throat were
[Two Gallants] [1673] left when he came to the corner of Rutland Square and felt more at
[Two Gallants] [1678] Ginger Beer and Ginger Ale. A cut ham was exposed on a great
[Two Gallants] [1680] plum-pudding. He eyed this food earnestly for some time and then,
[Two Gallants] [1681] after glancing warily up and down the street, went into the shop
[Two Gallants] [1687] opposite two work-girls and a mechanic. A slatternly girl waited
[Two Gallants] [1694] "Bring me a plate of peas," he said, "and a bottle of ginger beer."
[Two Gallants] [1698] appear natural he pushed his cap back on his head and planted his
[Two Gallants] [1699] elbows on the table. The mechanic and the two work-girls
[Two Gallants] [1702] seasoned with pepper and vinegar, a fork and his ginger beer. He
[Two Gallants] [1703] ate his food greedily and found it so good that he made a note of
[Two Gallants] [1705] ginger beer and sat for some time thinking of Corley's adventure.
[Two Gallants] [1707] dark road; he heard Corley's voice in deep energetic gallantries and
[Two Gallants] [1709] him feel keenly his own poverty of purse and spirit. He was tired
[Two Gallants] [1710] of knocking about, of pulling the devil by the tail, of shifts and
[Two Gallants] [1713] thought how pleasant it would be to have a warm fire to sit by and
[Two Gallants] [1715] enough with friends and with girls. He knew what those friends
[Two Gallants] [1720] in some snug corner and live happily if he could only come across
[Two Gallants] [1723] He paid twopence halfpenny to the slatternly girl and went out of
[Two Gallants] [1725] and walked along towards the City Hall. Then he turned into Dame
[Two Gallants] [1727] and stopped to converse with them. He was glad that he could rest
[Two Gallants] [1728] from all his walking. His friends asked him had he seen Corley and
[Two Gallants] [1731] some figures in the crowd and sometimes made a critical remark.
[Two Gallants] [1739] He left his friends at a quarter to ten and went up George's Street.
[Two Gallants] [1740] He turned to the left at the City Markets and walked on into
[Two Gallants] [1741] Grafton Street. The crowd of girls and young men had thinned and
[Two Gallants] [1742] on his way up the street he heard many groups and couples bidding
[Two Gallants] [1747] took his stand in the shadow of a lamp and brought out one of the
[Two Gallants] [1748] cigarettes which he had reserved and lit it. He leaned against the
[Two Gallants] [1749] lamp-post and kept his gaze fixed on the part from which he
[Two Gallants] [1750] expected to see Corley and the young woman return.
[Two Gallants] [1754] leave it to the last. He suffered all the pangs and thrills of his
[Two Gallants] [1758] that perhaps Corley had seen her home by another way and given
[Two Gallants] [1762] his last cigarette and began to smoke it nervously. He strained his
[Two Gallants] [1765] broke and he flung it into the road with a curse.
[Two Gallants] [1768] delight and keeping close to his lamp-post tried to read the result
[Two Gallants] [1775] They turned down Baggot Street and he followed them at once,
[Two Gallants] [1777] talked for a few moments and then the young woman went down
[Two Gallants] [1780] minutes passed. Then the hall-door was opened slowly and
[Two Gallants] [1781] cautiously. A woman came running down the front steps and
[Two Gallants] [1782] coughed. Corley turned and went towards her. His broad figure hid
[Two Gallants] [1783] hers from view for a few seconds and then she reappeared running
[Two Gallants] [1784] up the steps. The door closed on her and Corley began to walk
[Two Gallants] [1788] fell. He took them as a warning and, glancing back towards the
[Two Gallants] [1790] observed, he ran eagerly across the road. Anxiety and his swift run
[Two Gallants] [1795] Corley turned his head to see who had called him, and then
[Two Gallants] [1801] He came level with his friend and looked keenly in his face. He
[Two Gallants] [1807] Corley swerved to the left and went up the side street. His features
[Two Gallants] [1809] breathing uneasily. He was baffled and a note of menace pierced
[Two Gallants] [1814] Corley halted at the first lamp and stared grimly before him. Then
[Two Gallants] [1815] with a grave gesture he extended a hand towards the light and,
[The Boarding House] [1823] had married her father's foreman and opened a butcher's shop near
[The Boarding House] [1828] in the presence of customers and by buying bad meat he ruined his
[The Boarding House] [1829] business. One night he went for his wife with the cleaver and she
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1834] neither money nor food nor house-room; and so he was obliged to
[The Boarding House] [1836] drunkard with a white face and a white moustache white eyebrows,
[The Boarding House] [1837] pencilled above his little eyes, which were veined and raw; and all
[The Boarding House] [1840] the butcher business and set up a boarding house in Hardwicke
[The Boarding House] [1842] population made up of tourists from Liverpool and the Isle of Man
[The Boarding House] [1843] and, occasionally, artistes from the music halls. Its resident
[The Boarding House] [1845] house cunningly and firmly, knew when to give credit, when to be
[The Boarding House] [1846] stern and when to let things pass. All the resident young men spoke
[The Boarding House] [1851] and lodgings (beer or stout at dinner excluded). They shared in
[The Boarding House] [1852] common tastes and occupations and for this reason they were very
[The Boarding House] [1854] chances of favourites and outsiders. Jack Mooney, the Madam's
[The Boarding House] [1858] met his friends he had always a good one to tell them and he was
[The Boarding House] [1860] a likely artiste. He was also handy with the mits and sang comic
[The Boarding House] [1863] oblige; and Sheridan played waltzes and polkas and vamped
[The Boarding House] [1871] Polly was a slim girl of nineteen; she had light soft hair and a
[The Boarding House] [1878] word to his daughter, she had taken her daughter home again and
[The Boarding House] [1885] time and Mrs. Mooney began to think of sending Polly back to
[The Boarding House] [1887] between Polly and one of the young men. She watched the pair and
[The Boarding House] [1892] open complicity between mother and daughter, no open
[The Boarding House] [1895] little strange in her manner and the young man was evidently
[The Boarding House] [1898] deals with meat: and in this case she had made up her mind.
[The Boarding House] [1902] house were open and the lace curtains ballooned gently towards
[The Boarding House] [1904] sent out constant peals and worshippers, singly or in groups,
[The Boarding House] [1908] house and the table of the breakfast-room was covered with plates
[The Boarding House] [1909] on which lay yellow streaks of eggs with morsels of bacon-fat and
[The Boarding House] [1910] bacon-rind. Mrs. Mooney sat in the straw arm-chair and watched
[The Boarding House] [1912] collect the crusts and pieces of broken bread to help to make
[The Boarding House] [1914] bread collected, the sugar and butter safe under lock and key, she
[The Boarding House] [1917] frank in her questions and Polly had been frank in her answers.
[The Boarding House] [1920] fashion or to seem to have connived and Polly had been made
[The Boarding House] [1930] the matter out with Mr. Doran and then catch short twelve at
[The Boarding House] [1934] assuming that he was a man of honour and he had simply abused
[The Boarding House] [1938] world. He had simply taken advantage of Polly's youth and
[The Boarding House] [1958] Catholic wine-merchant's office and publicity would mean for
[The Boarding House] [1960] well. She knew he had a good screw for one thing and she
[The Boarding House] [1963] Nearly the half-hour! She stood up and surveyed herself in the
[The Boarding House] [1965] her and she thought of some mothers she knew who could not get
[The Boarding House] [1971] jaws and every two or three minutes a mist gathered on his glasses
[The Boarding House] [1972] so that he had to take them off and polish them with his
[The Boarding House] [1975] out every ridiculous detail of the affair and in the end had so
[The Boarding House] [1979] would be sure to be talked of and his employer would be certain to
[The Boarding House] [1985] All his long years of service gone for nothing! All his industry and
[The Boarding House] [1987] of course; he had boasted of his free-thinking and denied the
[The Boarding House] [1989] all passed and done with... nearly. He still bought a copy of
[The Boarding House] [1991] duties and for nine-tenths of the year lived a regular life. He had
[The Boarding House] [1994] father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a
[The Boarding House] [1996] imagine his friends talking of the affair and laughing. She was a
[The Boarding House] [1997] little vulgar; some times she said "I seen" and "If I had've known."
[The Boarding House] [2004] While he was sitting helplessly on the side of the bed in shirt and
[The Boarding House] [2005] trousers she tapped lightly at his door and entered. She told him
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2007] her mother would speak with him that morning. She cried and
[The Boarding House] [2025] shone in the opening of her furry slippers and the blood glowed
[The Boarding House] [2026] warmly behind her perfumed skin. From her hands and wrists too
[The Boarding House] [2027] as she lit and steadied her candle a faint perfume arose.
[The Boarding House] [2031] him alone, at night, in the sleeping house. And her thoughtfulness!
[The Boarding House] [2037] and on the third landing exchange reluctant goodnights. They used
[The Boarding House] [2038] to kiss. He remembered well her eyes, the touch of her hand and
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[The Boarding House] [2048] He stood up to put on his coat and waistcoat, more helpless than
[The Boarding House] [2050] would be all right, never fear. He left her crying on the bed and
[The Boarding House] [2054] moisture that he had to take them off and polish them. He longed
[The Boarding House] [2055] to ascend through the roof and fly away to another country where
[The Boarding House] [2056] he would never hear again of his trouble, and yet a force pushed
[The Boarding House] [2058] and of the Madam stared upon his discomfiture. On the last flight
[The Boarding House] [2060] pantry nursing two bottles of Bass. They saluted coldly; and the
[The Boarding House] [2061] lover's eyes rested for a second or two on a thick bulldog face and
[The Boarding House] [2063] staircase he glanced up and saw Jack regarding him from the door
[The Boarding House] [2070] little paler than usual, kept smiling and saying that there was no
[The Boarding House] [2076] dried her eyes and went over to the looking-glass. She dipped the
[The Boarding House] [2077] end of the towel in the water-jug and refreshed her eyes with the
[The Boarding House] [2078] cool water. She looked at herself in profile and readjusted a
[The Boarding House] [2079] hairpin above her ear. Then she went back to the bed again and sat
[The Boarding House] [2080] at the foot. She regarded the pillows for a long time and the sight
[The Boarding House] [2082] rested the nape of her neck against the cool iron bed-rail and fell
[The Boarding House] [2087] memories gradually giving place to hopes and visions of the
[The Boarding House] [2088] future. Her hopes and visions were so intricate that she no longer
[The Boarding House] [2092] At last she heard her mother calling. She started to her feet and ran
[A Little Cloud] [2106] and wished him godspeed. Gallaher had got on. You could tell that
[A Little Cloud] [2107] at once by his travelled air, his well-cut tweed suit, and fearless
[A Little Cloud] [2108] accent. Few fellows had talents like his and fewer still could
[A Little Cloud] [2110] place and he had deserved to win. It was something to have a
[A Little Cloud] [2114] meeting with Gallaher, of Gallaher's invitation and of the great city
[A Little Cloud] [2117] gave one the idea of being a little man. His hands were white and
[A Little Cloud] [2118] small, his frame was fragile, his voice was quiet and his manners
[A Little Cloud] [2119] were refined. He took the greatest care of his fair silken hair and
[A Little Cloud] [2120] moustache and used perfume discreetly on his handkerchief. The
[A Little Cloud] [2121] half-moons of his nails were perfect and when he smiled you
[A Little Cloud] [2126] under a shabby and necessitous guise had become a brilliant figure
[A Little Cloud] [2129] covered the grass plots and walks. It cast a shower of kindly
[A Little Cloud] [2130] golden dust on the untidy nurses and decrepit old men who
[A Little Cloud] [2132] on the children who ran screaming along the gravel paths and on
[A Little Cloud] [2134] and thought of life; and (as always happened when he thought of
[A Little Cloud] [2140] had bought them in his bachelor days and many an evening, as he
[A Little Cloud] [2142] down from the bookshelf and read out something to his wife. But
[A Little Cloud] [2143] shyness had always held him back; and so the books had remained
[A Little Cloud] [2144] on their shelves. At times he repeated lines to himself and this
[A Little Cloud] [2147] When his hour had struck he stood up and took leave of his desk
[A Little Cloud] [2148] and of his fellow-clerks punctiliously. He emerged from under the
[A Little Cloud] [2149] feudal arch of the King's Inns, a neat modest figure, and walked
[A Little Cloud] [2150] swiftly down Henrietta Street. The golden sunset was waning and
[A Little Cloud] [2155] through all that minute vermin-like life and under the shadow of
[A Little Cloud] [2161] He knew that people went there after the theatre to eat oysters and
[A Little Cloud] [2162] drink liqueurs; and he had heard that the waiters there spoke
[A Little Cloud] [2163] French and German. Walking swiftly by at night he had seen cabs
[A Little Cloud] [2164] drawn up before the door and richly dressed ladies, escorted by
[A Little Cloud] [2165] cavaliers, alight and enter quickly. They wore noisy dresses and
[A Little Cloud] [2166] many wraps. Their faces were powdered and they caught up their
[A Little Cloud] [2169] walk swiftly in the street even by day and whenever he found
[A Little Cloud] [2171] apprehensively and excitedly. Sometimes, however, he courted the
[A Little Cloud] [2172] causes of his fear. He chose the darkest and narrowest streets and,
[A Little Cloud] [2175] and at times a sound of low fugitive laughter made him tremble
[A Little Cloud] [2183] rakish set of fellows at that time. drank freely and borrowed
[A Little Cloud] [2188] yourself. Even when he was out at elbows and at his wits' end for
[A Little Cloud] [2189] money he kept up a bold face. Little Chandler remembered (and
[A Little Cloud] [2196] That was Ignatius Gallaher all out; and, damn it, you couldn't but
[A Little Cloud] [2204] Bridge he looked down the river towards the lower quays and
[A Little Cloud] [2207] covered with dust and soot, stupefied by the panorama of sunset
[A Little Cloud] [2208] and waiting for the first chill of night bid them arise, shake
[A Little Cloud] [2209] themselves and begone. He wondered whether he could write a
[A Little Cloud] [2220] different moods and impressions that he wished to express in
[A Little Cloud] [2224] recurrences of faith and resignation and simple joy. If he could
[A Little Cloud] [2230] that, he would put in allusions. He began to invent sentences and
[A Little Cloud] [2232] has the gift of easy and graceful verse." ... "wistful sadness
[A Little Cloud] [2239] He pursued his revery so ardently that he passed his street and had
[A Little Cloud] [2241] to overmaster him and he halted before the door in indecision.
[A Little Cloud] [2242] Finally he opened the door and entered.
[A Little Cloud] [2244] The light and noise of the bar held him at the doorways for a few
[A Little Cloud] [2246] shining of many red and green wine-glasses The bar seemed to him
[A Little Cloud] [2247] to be full of people and he felt that the people were observing him
[A Little Cloud] [2248] curiously. He glanced quickly to right and left (frowning slightly to
[A Little Cloud] [2250] he saw that nobody had turned to look at him: and there, sure
[A Little Cloud] [2252] counter and his feet planted far apart.
[A Little Cloud] [2258] good fellow.... Well, and how have you been pulling along since I
[A Little Cloud] [2260] signs of aging in me--eh, what? A little grey and thin on the top--
[A Little Cloud] [2263] Ignatius Gallaher took off his hat and displayed a large closely
[A Little Cloud] [2264] cropped head. His face was heavy, pale and cleanshaven. His eyes,
[A Little Cloud] [2266] and shone out plainly above the vivid orange tie he wore. Between
[A Little Cloud] [2267] these rival features the lips appeared very long and shapeless and
[A Little Cloud] [2268] colourless. He bent his head and felt with two sympathetic fingers
[A Little Cloud] [2272] "It pulls you down," be said, "Press life. Always hurry and scurry,
[A Little Cloud] [2273] looking for copy and sometimes not finding it: and then, always to
[A Little Cloud] [2274] have something new in your stuff. Damn proofs and printers, I say,
[A Little Cloud] [2288] "Ah well," said Ignatius Gallaher, cheerfully, "here's to us and to
[A Little Cloud] [2289] old times and old acquaintance."
[A Little Cloud] [2291] They clinked glasses and drank the toast.
[A Little Cloud] [2302] "I met him one night in London and he seemed to be very flush....
[A Little Cloud] [2311] mornings when I had a sore head and a fur on my tongue. You'd
[A Little Cloud] [2326] "And is it really so beautiful as they say?" asked Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2331] "Beautiful?" said Ignatius Gallaher, pausing on the word and on
[A Little Cloud] [2336] Little Chandler finished his whisky and, after some trouble,
[A Little Cloud] [2341] the barman had removed their glasses, "and I've been to all the
[A Little Cloud] [2346] glasses: then he touched his friend's glass lightly and reciprocated
[A Little Cloud] [2348] Gallaher's accent and way of expressing himself did not please
[A Little Cloud] [2351] London amid the bustle and competition of the Press. The old
[A Little Cloud] [2352] personal charm was still there under this new gaudy manner. And,
[A Little Cloud] [2357] in enjoying life--and don't you think they're right? If you want to
[A Little Cloud] [2358] enjoy yourself properly you must go to Paris. And, mind you,
[A Little Cloud] [2376] Ignatius Gallaher drank off his whisky and shook his had.
[A Little Cloud] [2384] "London!" said Ignatius Gallaher. "It's six of one and half-a-dozen
[A Little Cloud] [2399] cigars and puffed at them in silence until their drinks were served.
[A Little Cloud] [2406] Ignatius Gallaher puffed thoughtfully at his cigar and then, in a
[A Little Cloud] [2409] the vices of many capitals and seemed inclined to award the palm
[A Little Cloud] [2413] houses on the Continent and described some of the practices which
[A Little Cloud] [2414] were fashionable in high society and ended by telling, with details,
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2430] Little Chandler blushed and smiled.
[A Little Cloud] [2440] "Well, Tommy," he said, "I wish you and yours every joy in life,
[A Little Cloud] [2441] old chap, and tons of money, and may you never die till I shoot
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2461] Little Chandler smiled, looked confusedly at his glass and bit his
[A Little Cloud] [2466] music and----"
[A Little Cloud] [2474] fellow, clever young chap he is too, and we arranged to go to a
[A Little Cloud] [2489] "And to clinch the bargain," said Little Chandler, "we'll just have
[A Little Cloud] [2492] Ignatius Gallaher took out a large gold watch and looked a it.
[A Little Cloud] [2504] made him blush at any time: and now he felt warm and excited.
[A Little Cloud] [2505] Three small whiskies had gone to his head and Gallaher's strong
[A Little Cloud] [2506] cigar had confused his mind, for he was a delicate and abstinent
[A Little Cloud] [2508] finding himself with Gallaher in Corless's surrounded by lights and
[A Little Cloud] [2509] noise, of listening to Gallaher's stories and of sharing for a brief
[A Little Cloud] [2510] space Gallaher's vagrant and triumphant life, upset the equipoise of
[A Little Cloud] [2512] life and his friend's and it seemed to him unjust. Gallaher was his
[A Little Cloud] [2513] inferior in birth and education. He was sure that he could do
[A Little Cloud] [2523] towards his friend and took up the other boldly.
[A Little Cloud] [2526] come next year I may have the pleasure of wishing long life and
[A Little Cloud] [2527] happiness to Mr. and Mrs. Ignatius Gallaher."
[A Little Cloud] [2531] decisively, set down his glass and said:
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2539] Ignatius Gallaher turned his orange tie and slate-blue eyes full
[A Little Cloud] [2547] He had slightly emphasised his tone and he was aware that he had
[A Little Cloud] [2550] watched him for a few moments and then said:
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2560] the woman and the cash. You don't believe it? Well, I know it.
[A Little Cloud] [2562] Germans and Jews, rotten with money, that'd only be too glad....
[A Little Cloud] [2566] He tossed his glass to his mouth, finished his drink and laughed
[A Little Cloud] [2567] loudly. Then he looked thoughtfully before him and said in a
[A Little Cloud] [2573] He imitated with his mouth the act of tasting and made a wry face.
[A Little Cloud] [2579] Monica came for an hour or so in the morning and an hour or so in
[A Little Cloud] [2581] quarter to nine. Little Chandler had come home late for tea and,
[A Little Cloud] [2583] coffee from Bewley's. Of course she was in a bad humour and gave
[A Little Cloud] [2586] she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and
[A Little Cloud] [2588] and said:
[A Little Cloud] [2592] A little lamp with a white china shade stood upon the table and its
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2600] and trying to appear at his ease while the girl piled ladies' blouses
[A Little Cloud] [2601] before him, paying at the desk and forgetting to take up the odd
[A Little Cloud] [2602] penny of his change, being called back by the cashier, and finally,
[A Little Cloud] [2605] home Annie kissed him and said it was very pretty and stylish; but
[A Little Cloud] [2606] when she heard the price she threw the blouse on the table and said
[A Little Cloud] [2607] it was a regular swindle to charge ten and elevenpence for it. At
[A Little Cloud] [2609] delighted with it, especially with the make of the sleeves, and
[A Little Cloud] [2610] kissed him and said he was very good to think of her.
[A Little Cloud] [2614] He looked coldly into the eyes of the photograph and they
[A Little Cloud] [2615] answered coldly. Certainly they were pretty and the face itself was
[A Little Cloud] [2617] unconscious and ladylike? The composure of the eyes irritated
[A Little Cloud] [2618] him. They repelled him and defied him: there was no passion in
[A Little Cloud] [2624] He caught himself up at the question and glanced nervously round
[A Little Cloud] [2627] it herself and it reminded hi of her. It too was prim and pretty. A
[A Little Cloud] [2631] furniture still to be paid for. If he could only write a book and get
[A Little Cloud] [2635] it cautiously with his left hand lest he should waken the child and
[A Little Cloud] [2638] Hushed are the winds and still the evening gloom,
[A Little Cloud] [2644] And scatter flowers on tbe dust I love.
[A Little Cloud] [2652] The child awoke and began to cry. He turned from the page and
[A Little Cloud] [2654] and fro in his arms but its wailing cry grew keener. He rocked it
[A Little Cloud] [2664] and suddenly bending to the child's face he shouted:
[A Little Cloud] [2668] The child stopped for an instant, had a spasm of fright and began
[A Little Cloud] [2669] to scream. He jumped up from his chair and walked hastily up and
[A Little Cloud] [2671] piteously, losing its breath for four or five seconds, and then
[A Little Cloud] [2674] the contracted and quivering face of the child and began to be
[A Little Cloud] [2675] alarmed. He counted seven sobs without a break between them and
[A Little Cloud] [2678] The door was burst open and a young woman ran in, panting.
[A Little Cloud] [2687] She flung her parcels on the floor and snatched the child from him.
[A Little Cloud] [2691] Little Chandler sustained for one moment the gaze of her eyes and
[A Little Cloud] [2698] Giving no heed to him she began to walk up and down the room,
[A Little Cloud] [2699] clasping the child tightly in her arms and murmuring:
[A Little Cloud] [2705] Little Chandler felt his cheeks suffused with shame and he stood
[A Little Cloud] [2707] child's sobbing grew less and less; and tears of remorse started to
[Counterparts] [2712] THE bell rang furiously and, when Miss Parker went to the tube, a
[Counterparts] [2722] The man muttered "Blast him!" under his breath and pushed back
[Counterparts] [2723] his chair to stand up. When he stood up he was tall and of great
[Counterparts] [2725] eyebrows and moustache: his eyes bulged forward slightly and the
[Counterparts] [2726] whites of them were dirty. He lifted up the counter and, passing by
[Counterparts] [2731] Here he halted, puffing with labour and vexation, and knocked.
[Counterparts] [2739] pink and hairless it seemed like a large egg reposing on the papers.
[Counterparts] [2744] that contract between Bodley and Kirwan? I told you it must be
[Counterparts] [2749] "Mr. Shelley said, sir .... Kindly attend to what I say and not to
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2768] his throat for a few moments and then passed, leaving after it a
[Counterparts] [2769] sharp sensation of thirst. The man recognised the sensation and felt
[Counterparts] [2771] was passed and, if he could get the copy done in time, Mr. Alleyne
[Counterparts] [2783] "Very good, you needn't wait to see. Go downstairs and do your
[Counterparts] [2786] The man walked heavily towards the door and, as he went out of
[Counterparts] [2790] He returned to his desk in the lower office and counted the sheets
[Counterparts] [2791] which remained to be copied. He took up his pen and dipped it in
[Counterparts] [2794] was falling and in a few minutes they would be lighting the gas:
[Counterparts] [2796] throat. He stood up from his desk and, lifting the counter as before,
[Counterparts] [2806] head and ran quickly down the rickety stairs. From the street door
[Counterparts] [2808] corner and all at once dived into a doorway. He was now safe in
[Counterparts] [2809] the dark snug of O'Neill's shop, and filling up the little window
[Counterparts] [2816] a gulp and asked for a caraway seed. He put his penny on the
[Counterparts] [2817] counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom,
[Counterparts] [2821] of February and the lamps in Eustace Street had been lit. The man
[Counterparts] [2826] cap back again into his pocket and re-entered the office, assuming
[Counterparts] [2838] Well, you better look sharp and get a copy of our correspondence
[Counterparts] [2841] This address in the presence of the public, his run upstairs and the
[Counterparts] [2842] porter he had gulped down so hastily confused the man and, as he
[Counterparts] [2845] half past five. The dark damp night was coming and he longed to
[Counterparts] [2847] and the clatter of glasses. He got out the Delacour correspondence
[Counterparts] [2848] and passed out of the office. He hoped Mr. Alleyne would not
[Counterparts] [2854] money. She came to the office often and stayed a long time when
[Counterparts] [2856] perfumes, smoothing the handle of her umbrella and nodding the
[Counterparts] [2858] round to face her and thrown his right foot jauntily upon his left
[Counterparts] [2859] knee. The man put the correspondence on the desk and bowed
[Counterparts] [2862] correspondence and then flicked it towards him as if to say: "That's
[Counterparts] [2865] The man returned to the lower office and sat down again at his
[Counterparts] [2867] the said Bernard Bodley be... and thought how strange it was that
[Counterparts] [2871] the machine for a few minutes and then set to work to finish his
[Counterparts] [2872] copy. But his head was not clear and his mind wandered away to
[Counterparts] [2873] the glare and rattle of the public-house. It was a night for hot
[Counterparts] [2878] Bernard instead of Bernard Bodley and had to begin again on a
[Counterparts] [2882] His body ached to do something, to rush out and revel in violence.
[Counterparts] [2886] would meet the boys: Leonard and O'Halloran and Nosey Flynn.
[Counterparts] [2890] twice before he answered. Mr. Alleyne and Miss Delacour were
[Counterparts] [2891] standing outside the counter and all the clerks had turn round in
[Counterparts] [2896] and violent that the man could hardly restrain his fist from
[Counterparts] [2907] and back again; and, almost before he was aware of it, his tongue
[Counterparts] [2914] neighbours) and Miss Delacour, who was a stout amiable person,
[Counterparts] [2916] rose and his mouth twitched with a dwarf s passion. He shook his
[Counterparts] [2930] cashier would come out alone. All the clerks passed out and finally
[Counterparts] [2938] felt savage and thirsty and revengeful, annoyed with himself and
[Counterparts] [2942] they had never pulled together from the first, he and Mr. Alleyne,
[Counterparts] [2944] North of Ireland accent to amuse Higgins and Miss Parker: that
[Counterparts] [2950] public-house. The fog had begun to chill him and he wondered
[Counterparts] [2952] than a bob--and a bob was no use. Yet he must get money
[Counterparts] [2953] somewhere or other: he had spent his last penny for the g.p. and
[Counterparts] [2962] crown! but the consignor held out for six shillings; and in the end
[Counterparts] [2965] his thumb and fingers. In Westmoreland Street the footpaths were
[Counterparts] [2966] crowded with young men and women returning from business and
[Counterparts] [2967] ragged urchins ran here and there yelling out the names of the
[Counterparts] [2969] the spectacle generally with proud satisfaction and staring
[Counterparts] [2971] tram- gongs and swishing trolleys and his nose already sniffed the
[Counterparts] [2975] "So, I just looked at him--coolly, you know, and looked at her.
[Counterparts] [2980] and, when he heard the story, he stood Farrington a half-one,
[Counterparts] [2982] drink in his turn. After a while O'Halloran and Paddy Leonard
[Counterparts] [2983] came in and the story was repeated to them. O'Halloran stood
[Counterparts] [2984] tailors of malt, hot, all round and told the story of the retort he had
[Counterparts] [2989] that and have another.
[Counterparts] [2993] asked him to give his version of it, and he did so with great
[Counterparts] [2997] imitated Farrington, saying, "And here was my nabs, as cool as you
[Counterparts] [2999] dirty eyes, smiling and at times drawing forth stray drops of liquor
[Counterparts] [3005] Duke Street Higgins and Nosey Flynn bevelled off to the left while
[Counterparts] [3007] down on the cold streets and, when they reached the Ballast
[Counterparts] [3009] men and loud with the noise of tongues and glasses. The three men
[Counterparts] [3010] pushed past the whining matchsellers at the door and formed a
[Counterparts] [3013] Weathers who was performing at the Tivoli as an acrobat and
[Counterparts] [3015] said he would take a small Irish and Apollinaris. Farrington, who
[Counterparts] [3018] The talk became theatrical. O'Halloran stood a round and then
[Counterparts] [3021] scenes and introduce them to some nice girls. O'Halloran said that
[Counterparts] [3022] he and Leonard would go, but that Farrington wouldn't go because
[Counterparts] [3023] he was a married man; and Farrington's heavy dirty eyes leered at
[Counterparts] [3026] and promised to meet them later on at Mulligan's in Poolbeg
[Counterparts] [3030] They went into the parlour at the back and O'Halloran ordered
[Counterparts] [3035] keep them going. Presently two young women with big hats and a
[Counterparts] [3036] young man in a check suit came in and sat at a table close by.
[Counterparts] [3037] Weathers saluted them and told the company that they were out of
[Counterparts] [3041] muslin was wound round her hat and knotted in a great bow under
[Counterparts] [3042] her chin; and she wore bright yellow gloves, reaching to the elbow.
[Counterparts] [3044] very often and with much grace; and when, after a little time, she
[Counterparts] [3047] glanced at him once or twice and, when the party was leaving the
[Counterparts] [3048] room, she brushed against his chair and said "O, pardon!" in a
[Counterparts] [3051] want of money and cursed all the rounds he had stood, particularly
[Counterparts] [3052] all the whiskies and Apolinaris which he had stood to Weathers. If
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Counterparts] [3060] his sleeve accordingly and showed his biceps muscle to the
[Counterparts] [3061] company. The two arms were examined and compared and finally
[Counterparts] [3062] it was agreed to have a trial of strength. The table was cleared and
[Counterparts] [3065] on to the table. Farrington looked very serious and determined.
[Counterparts] [3069] wine-coloured face flushed darker still with anger and humiliation
[Counterparts] [3080] forehead, and the pallor of Weathers' complexion changed to
[Counterparts] [3081] peony. Their hands and arms trembled under the stress. After a
[Counterparts] [3085] his red head towards the victor and said with stupid familiarity:
[Counterparts] [3094] more and then we'll be off."
[Counterparts] [3102] full of smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated
[Counterparts] [3103] and discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only
[Counterparts] [3105] himself in the office, pawned his watch, spent all his money; and
[Counterparts] [3106] he had not even got drunk. He began to feel thirsty again and he
[Counterparts] [3109] a mere boy. His heart swelled with fury and, when he thought of
[Counterparts] [3110] the woman in the big hat who had brushed against him and said
[Counterparts] [3113] His tram let him down at Shelbourne Road and he steered his great
[Counterparts] [3116] the kitchen empty and the kitchen fire nearly out. He bawled
[Counterparts] [3122] when he was sober and was bullied by him when he was drunk.
[Counterparts] [3147] lamp was lit he banged his fist on the table and shouted:
[Counterparts] [3153] The man jumped up furiously and pointed to the fire.
[Counterparts] [3158] He took a step to the door and seized the walking-stick which was
[Counterparts] [3164] The little boy cried "O, pa!" and ran whimpering round the table,
[Counterparts] [3165] but the man followed him and caught him by the coat. The little
[Counterparts] [3173] clasped his hands together in the air and his voice shook with
[Counterparts] [3176] "O, pa!" he cried. "Don't beat me, pa! And I'll... I'll say a Hail Mary
[Clay] [3183] tea was over and Maria looked forward to her evening out. The
[Clay] [3184] kitchen was spick and span: the cook said you could see yourself
[Clay] [3185] in the big copper boilers. The fire was nice and bright and on one
[Clay] [3188] that they had been cut into long thick even slices and were ready to
[Clay] [3192] nose and a very long chin. She talked a little through her nose,
[Clay] [3193] always soothingly: "Yes, my dear," and "No, my dear." She was
[Clay] [3194] always sent for when the women quarrelled Over their tubs and
[Clay] [3200] And the sub-matron and two of the Board ladies had heard the
[Clay] [3201] compliment. And Ginger Mooney was always saying what she
[Clay] [3205] The women would have their tea at six o'clock and she would be
[Clay] [3208] and twenty minutes to buy the things. She would be there before
[Clay] [3209] eight. She took out her purse with the silver clasps and read again
[Clay] [3211] because Joe had brought it to her five years before when he and
[Clay] [3213] were two half-crowns and some coppers. She would have five
[Clay] [3219] Often he had wanted her to go and live with them;-but she would
[Clay] [3221] with her) and she had become accustomed to the life of the
[Clay] [3222] laundry. Joe was a good fellow. She had nursed him and Alphy
[Clay] [3223] too; and Joe used often say:
[Clay] [3228] Dublin by Lamplight laundry, and she liked it. She used to have
[Clay] [3230] very nice people, a little quiet and serious, but still very nice
[Clay] [3232] and she liked looking after them. She had lovely ferns and
[Clay] [3233] wax-plants and, whenever anyone came to visit her, she always
[Clay] [3235] one thing she didn't like and that was the tracts on the walks; but
[Clay] [3239] women's room and began to pull the big bell. In a few minutes the
[Clay] [3240] women began to come in by twos and threes, wiping their
[Clay] [3241] steaming hands in their petticoats and pulling down the sleeves of
[Clay] [3243] before their huge mugs which the cook and the dummy filled up
[Clay] [3244] with hot tea, already mixed with milk and sugar in huge tin cans.
[Clay] [3245] Maria superintended the distribution of the barmbrack and saw
[Clay] [3247] laughing and joking during the meal. Lizzie Fleming said Maria
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3249] many Hallow Eves, Maria had to laugh and say she didn't want any
[Clay] [3250] ring or man either; and when she laughed her grey-green eyes
[Clay] [3251] sparkled with disappointed shyness and the tip of her nose nearly
[Clay] [3253] and proposed Maria's health while all the other women clattered
[Clay] [3254] with their mugs on the table, and said she was sorry she hadn't a
[Clay] [3255] sup of porter to drink it in. And Maria laughed again till the tip of
[Clay] [3256] her nose nearly met the tip of her chin and till her minute body
[Clay] [3260] But wasn't Maria glad when the women had finished their tea and
[Clay] [3261] the cook and the dummy had begun to clear away the tea- things!
[Clay] [3262] She went into her little bedroom and, remembering that the next
[Clay] [3264] seven to six. Then she took off her working skirt and her
[Clay] [3265] house-boots and laid her best skirt out on the bed and her tiny
[Clay] [3267] and, as she stood before the mirror, she thought of how she used to
[Clay] [3268] dress for mass on Sunday morning when she was a young girl; and
[Clay] [3273] When she got outside the streets were shining with rain and she
[Clay] [3274] was glad of her old brown waterproof. The tram was full and she
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3278] to be independent and to have your own money in your pocket.
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3285] She got out of her tram at the Pillar and ferreted her way quickly
[Clay] [3288] herself attended to. She bought a dozen of mixed penny cakes, and
[Clay] [3291] They would be sure to have plenty of apples and nuts. It was hard
[Clay] [3292] to know what to buy and all she could think of was cake. She
[Clay] [3295] Henry Street. Here she was a long time in suiting herself and the
[Clay] [3298] That made Maria blush and smile at the young lady; but the young
[Clay] [3299] lady took it all very seriously and finally cut a thick slice of
[Clay] [3300] plumcake, parcelled it up and said:
[Clay] [3302] "Two-and-four, please."
[Clay] [3306] gentleman made room for her. He was a stout gentleman and he
[Clay] [3307] wore a brown hard hat; he had a square red face and a greyish
[Clay] [3308] moustache. Maria thought he was a colonel-looking gentleman and
[Clay] [3311] chat with her about Hallow Eve and the rainy weather. He
[Clay] [3312] supposed the bag was full of good things for the little ones and
[Clay] [3314] while they were young. Maria agreed with him and favoured him
[Clay] [3315] with demure nods and hems. He was very nice with her, and when
[Clay] [3316] she was getting out at the Canal Bridge she thanked him and
[Clay] [3317] bowed, and he bowed to her and raised his hat and smiled
[Clay] [3318] agreeably, and while she was going up along the terrace, bending
[Clay] [3323] Joe was there, having come home from business, and all the
[Clay] [3325] from next door and games were going on. Maria gave the bag of
[Clay] [3326] cakes to the eldest boy, Alphy, to divide and Mrs. Donnelly said it
[Clay] [3327] was too good of her to bring such a big bag of cakes and made all
[Clay] [3332] But Maria said she had brought something special for papa and
[Clay] [3333] mamma, something they would be sure to like, and she began to
[Clay] [3334] look for her plumcake. She tried in Downes's bag and then in the
[Clay] [3335] pockets of her waterproof and then on the hallstand but nowhere
[Clay] [3337] eaten it--by mistake, of course--but the children all said no and
[Clay] [3339] accused of stealing. Everybody had a solution for the mystery and
[Clay] [3342] the greyish moustache had made her, coloured with shame and
[Clay] [3343] vexation and disappointment. At the thought of the failure of her
[Clay] [3344] little surprise and of the two and fourpence she had thrown away
[Clay] [3347] But Joe said it didn't matter and made her sit down by the fire. He
[Clay] [3355] the piano for the children and they danced and sang. Then the two
[Clay] [3357] nutcrackers and Joe was nearly getting cross over it and asked how
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3360] her. Then Joe asked would she take a bottle of stout and Mrs.
[Clay] [3365] So Maria let him have his way and they sat by the fire talking over
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3368] he spoke a word to his brother again and Maria said she was sorry
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3371] blood but Joe said that Alphy was no brother of his and there was
[Clay] [3373] lose his temper on account of the night it was and asked his wife to
[Clay] [3375] Hallow Eve games and soon everything was merry again. Maria
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3378] table and then led the children up to the table, blindfold. One got
[Clay] [3379] the prayer-book and the other three got the water; and when one of
[Clay] [3382] insisted then on blindfolding Maria and leading her up to the table
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Clay] [3384] bandage, Maria laughed and laughed again till the tip of her nose
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[Clay] [3389] about here and there in the air and descended on one of the
[Clay] [3390] saucers. She felt a soft wet substance with her fingers and was
[Clay] [3392] pause for a few seconds; and then a great deal of scuffling and
[Clay] [3393] whispering. Somebody said something about the garden, and at
[Clay] [3395] next-door girls and told her to throw it out at once: that was no
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3397] to do it over again: and this time she got the prayer-book.
[Clay] [3400] children and Joe made Maria take a glass of wine. Soon they were
[Clay] [3401] all quite merry again and Mrs. Donnelly said Maria would enter a
[Clay] [3404] that night, so full of pleasant talk and reminiscences. She said they
[Clay] [3407] At last the children grew tired and sleepy and Joe asked Maria
[Clay] [3409] songs. Mrs. Donnelly said "Do, please, Maria!" and so Maria had
[Clay] [3410] to get up and stand beside the piano. Mrs. Donnelly bade the
[Clay] [3411] children be quiet and listen to Maria's song. Then she played the
[Clay] [3412] prelude and said "Now, Maria!" and Maria, blushing very much
[Clay] [3414] Dwelt, and when she came to the second verse she sang again:
[Clay] [3418] With vassals and serfs at my side,
[Clay] [3419] And of all who assembled within those walls
[Clay] [3420] That I was the hope and the pride.
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[Clay] [3430] like the long ago and no music for him like poor old Balfe,
[Clay] [3431] whatever other people might say; and his eyes filled up so much
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3438] live as far as possible from the city of which he was a citizen and
[A Painful Case] [3440] and pretentious. He lived in an old sombre house and from his
[A Painful Case] [3446] fender and irons and a square table on which lay a double desk. A
[A Painful Case] [3448] white wood. The bed was clothed with white bedclothes and a
[A Painful Case] [3449] black and scarlet rug covered the foot. A little hand-mirror hung
[A Painful Case] [3450] above the washstand and during the day a white-shaded lamp stood
[A Painful Case] [3454] and a copy of the Maynooth Catechism, sewn into the cloth cover
[A Painful Case] [3458] were written in purple ink, and a little sheaf of papers held
[A Painful Case] [3460] from time to time and, in an ironical moment, the headline of an
[A Painful Case] [3464] overripe apple which might have been left there and forgotten.
[A Painful Case] [3469] tint of Dublin streets. On his long and rather large head grew dry
[A Painful Case] [3470] black hair and a tawny moustache did not quite cover an
[A Painful Case] [3479] the third person and a predicate in the past tense. He never gave
[A Painful Case] [3480] alms to beggars and walked firmly, carrying a stout hazel.
[A Painful Case] [3484] midday he went to Dan Burke's and took his lunch--a bottle of
[A Painful Case] [3485] lager beer and a small trayful of arrowroot biscuits. At four o'clock
[A Painful Case] [3488] and where there was a certain plain honesty in the bill of fare. His
[A Painful Case] [3496] relatives at Christmas and escorting them to the cemetery when
[A Painful Case] [3504] Rotunda. The house, thinly peopled and silent, gave distressing
[A Painful Case] [3506] deserted house once or twice and then said:
[A Painful Case] [3517] features. The eyes were very dark blue and steady. Their gaze
[A Painful Case] [3522] prudence, and her astrakhan jacket, moulding a bosom of a certain
[A Painful Case] [3526] Terrace and seized the moments when her daughter's attention was
[A Painful Case] [3531] captain of a mercantile boat plying between Dublin and Holland;
[A Painful Case] [3532] and they had one child.
[A Painful Case] [3536] met always in the evening and chose the most quiet quarters for
[A Painful Case] [3538] underhand ways and, finding that they were compelled to meet
[A Painful Case] [3543] interest in her. As the husband was often away and the daughter
[A Painful Case] [3546] adventure before and neither was conscious of any incongruity.
[A Painful Case] [3558] and in its own garret, he had discontinued his attendances. The
[A Painful Case] [3561] were hard-featured realists and that they resented an exactitude
[A Painful Case] [3570] its morality to policemen and its fine arts to impresarios?
[A Painful Case] [3581] that in her eyes he would ascend to an angelical stature; and, as he
[A Painful Case] [3582] attached the fervent nature of his companion more and more
[A Painful Case] [3588] passionately and pressed it to her cheek.
[A Painful Case] [3596] and down the roads of the Park for nearly three hours. They agreed
[A Painful Case] [3601] and left her. A few days later he received a parcel containing his
[A Painful Case] [3602] books and music.
[A Painful Case] [3607] and on his shelves stood two volumes by Nietzsche: Thus Spake
[A Painful Case] [3608] Zarathustra and The Gay Science. He wrote seldom in the sheaf of
[A Painful Case] [3611] between man and man is impossible because there must not be
[A Painful Case] [3612] sexual intercourse and friendship between man and woman is
[A Painful Case] [3615] partner of the bank retired. And still every morning he went into
[A Painful Case] [3616] the city by tram and every evening walked home from the city after
[A Painful Case] [3617] having dined moderately in George's Street and read the evening
[A Painful Case] [3620] One evening as he was about to put a morsel of corned beef and
[A Painful Case] [3624] on his plate and read the paragraph attentively. Then he drank a
[A Painful Case] [3626] down before him between his elbows and read the paragraph over
[A Painful Case] [3627] and over again. The cabbage began to deposit a cold white grease
[A Painful Case] [3629] properly cooked. He said it was very good and ate a few mouthfuls
[A Painful Case] [3630] of it with difficulty. Then he paid his bill and went out.
[A Painful Case] [3637] and his breath, issuing irregularly, almost with a sighing sound,
[A Painful Case] [3639] up at once to his bedroom and, taking the paper from his pocket,
[A Painful Case] [3655] thereby sustaining injuries of the head and right side which led to
[A Painful Case] [3660] the guard's whistle he set the train in motion and a second or two
[A Painful Case] [3666] her and shouted, but, before he could reach her, she was caught by
[A Painful Case] [3667] the buffer of the engine and fell to the ground.
[A Painful Case] [3680] stated that the deceased had two lower ribs fractured and had
[A Painful Case] [3684] opinion, had been probably due to shock and sudden failure of the
[A Painful Case] [3690] by the bridges, both by placing notices in every station and by the
[A Painful Case] [3693] platform and, in view of certain other circumstances of the case,
[A Painful Case] [3700] for twenty-two years and had lived happily until about two years
[A Painful Case] [3705] reason with her mother and had induced her to join a League. She
[A Painful Case] [3707] a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence and exonerated
[A Painful Case] [3710] The Deputy Coroner said it was a most painful case, and expressed
[A Painful Case] [3711] great sympathy with Captain Sinico and his daughter. He urged on
[A Painful Case] [3720] Mr. Duffy raised his eyes from the paper and gazed out of his
[A Painful Case] [3722] beside the empty distillery and from time to time a light appeared
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[A Painful Case] [3730] miserable and malodorous. His soul's companion! He thought of
[A Painful Case] [3731] the hobbling wretches whom he had seen carrying cans and bottles
[A Painful Case] [3737] outburst of that night and interpreted it in a harsher sense than he
[A Painful Case] [3741] As the light failed and his memory began to wander he thought her
[A Painful Case] [3743] was now attacking his nerves. He put on his overcoat and hat
[A Painful Case] [3744] quickly and went out. The cold air met him on the threshold; it
[A Painful Case] [3746] public-house at Chapelizod Bridge he went in and ordered a hot
[A Painful Case] [3752] intervals from their huge pint tumblers and smoked, spitting often
[A Painful Case] [3753] on the floor and sometimes dragging the sawdust over their spits
[A Painful Case] [3754] with their heavy boots. Mr. Duffy sat on his stool and gazed at
[A Painful Case] [3756] and he called for another punch. He sat a long time over it. The
[A Painful Case] [3758] reading the Herald and yawning. Now and again a tram was heard
[A Painful Case] [3761] As he sat there, living over his life with her and evoking
[A Painful Case] [3774] and gloomy. He entered the Park by the first gate and walked along
[A Painful Case] [3782] When he gained the crest of the Magazine Hill he halted and
[A Painful Case] [3784] redly and hospitably in the cold night. He looked down the slope
[A Painful Case] [3785] and, at the base, in the shadow of the wall of the Park, he saw
[A Painful Case] [3786] some human figures lying. Those venal and furtive loves filled him
[A Painful Case] [3789] love him and he had denied her life and happiness: he had
[A Painful Case] [3791] prostrate creatures down by the wall were watching him and
[A Painful Case] [3796] through the darkness, obstinately and laboriously. It passed slowly
[A Painful Case] [3802] memory told him. He halted under a tree and allowed the rhythm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3811] and spread them judiciously over the whitening dome of coals.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3814] ascended the opposite wall and his face slowly reemerged into
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3815] light. It was an old man's face, very bony and hairy. The moist blue
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3816] eyes blinked at the fire and the moist mouth fell open at times,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3819] sighed and said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3824] disfigured by many blotches and pimples, had just brought the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3827] tobacco again meditatively and after a moment's thought decided
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3835] Mr. O'Connor put his cigarette into his mouth and began search his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3842] He selected one of the cards and read what was printed on it:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3850] favour of your vote and influence at the coming election
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3855] part of the ward but, as the weather was inclement and his boots
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3859] dark. It was the sixth of October, dismal and cold out of doors.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3861] Mr. O'Connor tore a strip off the card and, lighting it, lit his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3863] lapel of his coat. The old man watched him attentively and then,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3869] the Christian Brothers and I done what I could him, and there he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3875] stick to his back and beat him while I could stand over him--as I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3877] up with this and that...."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3896] Mr. O'Connor shook his head in sympathy, and the old man fell
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3898] and called out:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3912] Imminent little drops of rain hung at the brim of his hat and the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3917] Mr. O'Connor shook his head. The old man left the hearth and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3919] which he thrust one after the other into the fire and carried to the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3920] table. A denuded room came into view and the fire lost all its
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3925] Mr. Hynes leaned against the mantelpiece and asked:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3951] difference between a good honest bricklayer and a publican--eh?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3953] anyone else--ay, and a better right than those shoneens that are
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3966] "The working-man," said Mr. Hynes, "gets all kicks and no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3968] not looking for fat jobs for his sons and nephews and cousins. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3988] together. Mr. Hynes took off his hat, shook it and then turned
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4001] snuffling nose and very cold ears pushed in the door. He walked
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4012] He nodded curtly to Mr. Hynes and sat down on the chair which
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4031] "He asked me who the nominators were; and I told him. I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4034] Mr. Henchy began to snuffle and to rub his hands over the fire at a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4059] "God, yes," said Mr. Henchy. "Did you never hear that? And the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4066] here and there on the fire.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4074] Mr. Hynes laughed and, shoving himself away from the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4086] Mr. Henchy waited a few moments and then nodded in the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4095] Mr. Henchy snuffled vigorously and spat so copiously that he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4100] Just go round and try and find out how they're getting on. They
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4113] the old man. "Let him work for his own side and not come spying
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4121] "Some of these hillsiders and fenians are a bit too clever if ask
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4137] country for fourpence--ay--and go down on his bended knees
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4138] and thank the Almighty Christ he had a country to sell."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4146] body and it was impossible to say whether he wore a clergyman's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4153] disappointment and at the same time opened wide his very bright
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4154] blue eyes to express pleasure and surprise.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4162] "Won't you come in and sit down?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4169] come in and sit down a minute?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4174] He retreated from the doorway and Mr. Henchy, seizing one of the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4187] Mr. Henchy returned with the candlestick and put it on the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4200] "Fanning and himself seem to me very thick. They're often in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4207] "And how does he knock it out?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4229] Cowley. I just waited till I caught his eye, and said: 'About that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4252] "And make me your private secretary, John."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4254] "Yes. And I'll make Father Keon my private chaplain. We'll have a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4261] live on the smell of an oil- rag.' And do you know what he told
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4264] "What?" said Mr. Henchy and Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4272] At this point there was a knock at the door, and a boy put in his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4277] "From the Black Eagle," said the boy, walking in sideways and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4281] to the table and counted the full tally. After the transfer the boy put
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4282] his basket on his arm and asked:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4294] "Here, boy!" said Mr. Henchy, "will you run over to O'Farrell's and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4298] The boy went out and Mr. Henchy began to rub his hands
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4315] bottles and was handing back the corkscrew when Mr. Henchy said
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4322] The old man opened another bottle grudgingly, and handed it to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4331] put the bottle back on the table and wiped his mouth with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4332] sleeve. Then he took up the corkscrew and went out of the door
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4339] The old man distributed the three bottles which he had opened and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4341] placed his bottle on the mantelpiece within hand's reach and drew
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4350] and myself. Between ourselves, you know, Crofton (he's a decent
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4352] hasn't a word to throw to a dog. He stands and looks at the people
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4358] face in expression, staring blue eyes and a grizzled moustache. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4359] other man, who was much younger and frailer, had a thin,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4360] clean-shaven face. He wore a very high double collar and a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4372] "Is that the way you chaps canvass," said Mr. Lyons, "and Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4373] and I out in the cold and rain looking for votes?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4385] He took two bottles from the table and, carrying them to the fire,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4386] put them on the hob. Then he sat dow-n again by the fire and took
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4388] table, pushed his hat towards the nape of his neck and began to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4395] Mr. Crofton sat down on a box and looked fixedly at the other
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4400] Conservatives had withdrawn their man and, choosing the lesser of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4406] the fire, took his bottle and carried it back to the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4413] "Well, I got Parkes for one, and I got Atkinson for two, and got
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4418] house property in the city and three places of business and isn't it
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4419] to his own advantage to keep down the rates? He's a prominent and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4420] respected citizen,' said I, 'and a Poor Law Guardian, and he doesn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4424] "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4425] drinking and smacking his lips.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4432] worked the old industries, the mills, the ship-building yards and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4443] one never went to see these wild Irish. By Christ, I'll go myself and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4453] personally. He's just an ordinary knockabout like you and me. He's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4454] fond of his glass of grog and he's a bit of a rake, perhaps, and he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4465] he did Parnell was a fit man to lead us? And why, then, would we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4468] "This is Parnell's anniversary," said Mr. O'Connor, "and don't let us
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4469] stir up any bad blood. We all respect him now that he's dead and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4473] got up from his box and went to the fire. As he returned with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4490] The old man handed him another bottle and he placed it on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4523] off his hat, laid it on the table and stood up. He seemed to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4532] He cleared his throat once or twice and then began to recite:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4536] O, Erin, mourn with grief and woe
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4541] And Erin's hopes and Erin's dreams
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4549] Her statesmen, bards and warriors raised
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4561] To befoul and smear the exalted name
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4565] And death has now united him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4576] And on that day may Erin well
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4582] recitation there was a silence and then a burst of clapping: even
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4587] remained sitting flushed and bare-headed on the table. He did not
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4591] papers and pouch the better to hide his emotion.
[A Mother] [4601] been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his
[A Mother] [4602] hands and pockets full of dirty pieces of paper, arranging about the
[A Mother] [4603] series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called
[A Mother] [4604] him Hoppy Holohan. He walked up and down constantly, stood by
[A Mother] [4605] the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in
[A Mother] [4610] and music. As she was naturally pale and unbending in manner she
[A Mother] [4612] she was sent out to many houses, where her playing and ivory
[A Mother] [4614] accomplishments, waiting for some suitor to brave it and offer her
[A Mother] [4616] and she gave them no encouragement, trying to console her
[A Mother] [4618] secret. However, when she drew near the limit and her friends
[A Mother] [4626] romantic ideas away. He was sober, thrifty and pious; he went to
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4630] ever so slightly he stood up to take his leave and, when his cough
[A Mother] [4631] troubled him, she put the eider-down quilt over his feet and made a
[A Mother] [4636] good convent, where she learned French and music, and afterward
[A Mother] [4645] determined to take advantage of her daughter's name and brought
[A Mother] [4646] an Irish teacher to the house. Kathleen and her sister sent Irish
[A Mother] [4647] picture postcards to their friends and these friends sent back other
[A Mother] [4652] friends; and, when they had played every little counter of gossip,
[A Mother] [4654] crossing of so man hands, and said good-bye to one another in
[A Mother] [4657] music and a very nice girl and, moreover, that she was a believer
[A Mother] [4660] to her and proposed that her daughter should be the accompanist at
[A Mother] [4663] drawing-room, made him sit down and brought out the decanter
[A Mother] [4664] and the silver biscuit-barrel. She entered heart and soul into the
[A Mother] [4665] details of the enterprise, advised and dissuaded: and finally a
[A Mother] [4670] wording of bills and the disposing of items for a programme, Mrs.
[A Mother] [4672] go into capitals and what artistes should go into small type. She
[A Mother] [4677] point. She was invariably friendly and advising--homely, in fact.
[A Mother] [4682] And while he was helping himself she said:
[A Mother] [4690] two-shilling tickets for the final concert and sent them to those
[A Mother] [4692] nothing, and, thanks to her, everything that was to be done was
[A Mother] [4695] The concerts were to be on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and
[A Mother] [4700] dress. She passed by with her daughter and a quick glance through
[A Mother] [4706] secretary of the Society, Mr. Fitzpatrick. She smiled and shook his
[A Mother] [4709] and that his accent was flat. He held a programme in his hand, and,
[A Mother] [4714] glanced from time to time at the mirror and rolled and unrolled
[A Mother] [4717] Fitzpatrick came in, smiled vacantly at the room, and said:
[A Mother] [4719] "Well now, ladies and gentlemen. I suppose we'd better open the
[A Mother] [4723] stare of contempt, and then said to her daughter encouragingly:
[A Mother] [4727] When she had an opportunity, she called Mr. Holohan aside and
[A Mother] [4732] "And the artistes!" said Mrs. Kearney. "Of course they are doing
[A Mother] [4737] they pleased and reserve all the talent for Saturday night. Mrs.
[A Mother] [4739] another on the platform and the few people in the hall grew fewer
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [4742] the look of things and Mr. Fitzpatrick's vacant smile irritated her
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4744] would end. The concert expired shortly before ten, and everyone
[A Mother] [4753] jutting out his head and exchanging a laugh with two friends in the
[A Mother] [4755] learned that the Friday concert was to be abandoned and that the
[A Mother] [4756] committee was going to move heaven and earth to secure a
[A Mother] [4759] quickly with a glass of lemonade for a young lady and asked him
[A Mother] [4767] She called Mr. Fitzpatrick away from his screen and told him that
[A Mother] [4768] her daughter had signed for four concerts and that, of course,
[A Mother] [4772] quickly, seemed unable to resolve the difficulty and said that he
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4777] "And who is the Cometty pray?"
[A Mother] [4788] carefully and said that perhaps it would be better if he went with
[A Mother] [4791] something large, secure and fixed; and though she knew the small
[A Mother] [4797] husband and daughter, arrived at the Antient Concert Rooms
[A Mother] [4800] her daughter's clothes and music in charge of her husband and
[A Mother] [4803] member of the committee in the hall and, after a great deal of
[A Mother] [4806] secretaries. Miss Beirne expected them any minute and asked
[A Mother] [4809] and enthusiasm and answered:
[A Mother] [4815] trustfulness and enthusiasm from her twisted features. Then she
[A Mother] [4816] gave a little sigh and said:
[A Mother] [4822] The artistes were arriving. The bass and the second tenor had
[A Mother] [4825] in an office in the city and, as a boy, he had sung prolonged bass
[A Mother] [4830] Queen's Theatre. He sang his music with great feeling and volume
[A Mother] [4831] and was warmly welcomed by the gallery; but, unfortunately, he
[A Mother] [4833] once or twice out of thoughtlessness. He was unassuming and
[A Mother] [4834] spoke little. He said yous so softly that it passed unnoticed and he
[A Mother] [4838] been awarded a bronze medal. He was extremely nervous and
[A Mother] [4839] extremely jealous of other tenors and he covered his nervous
[A Mother] [4842] he saw Mr. Duggan he went over to him and asked:
[A Mother] [4848] Mr. Bell laughed at his fellow-sufferer, held out his hand and said:
[A Mother] [4852] Mrs. Kearney passed by these two young men and went to the edge
[A Mother] [4854] rapidly and a pleasant noise circulated in the auditorium. She came
[A Mother] [4855] back and spoke to her husband privately. Their conversation was
[A Mother] [4867] dressing-room at that moment and the two young ladies asked him
[A Mother] [4870] corner of the room, holding a roll of music stiffly before her and
[A Mother] [4874] more audible. The first tenor and the baritone arrived together.
[A Mother] [4875] They were both well dressed, stout and complacent and they
[A Mother] [4878] Mrs. Kearney brought her daughter over to them, and talked to
[A Mother] [4881] limping and devious courses. As soon as she could she excused
[A Mother] [4882] herself and went out after him.
[A Mother] [4890] signed a contract for eight guineas and she would have to be paid.
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4906] taken possession of the fireplace and were chatting familiarly with
[A Mother] [4907] Miss Healy and the baritone. They were the Freeman man and Mr.
[A Mother] [4911] were to leave the report for him at the Freeman office and he
[A Mother] [4913] plausible voice and careful manners. He held an extinguished cigar
[A Mother] [4914] in his hand and the aroma of cigar smoke floated near him. He had
[A Mother] [4915] not intended to stay a moment because concerts and artistes bored
[A Mother] [4917] Miss Healy stood in front of him, talking and laughing. He was old
[A Mother] [4919] in spirit to turn the moment to account. The warmth, fragrance and
[A Mother] [4921] conscious that the bosom which he saw rise and fall slowly
[A Mother] [4922] beneath him rose and fell at that moment for him, that the laughter
[A Mother] [4923] and fragrance and wilful glances were his tribute. When he could
[A Mother] [4927] Holohan, "and I'll see it in."
[A Mother] [4935] The two men went along some tortuous passages and up a dark
[A Mother] [4936] staircase and came to a secluded room where one of the stewards
[A Mother] [4953] encouragement, clapping and stamping of feet. The first tenor and
[A Mother] [4954] the baritone and Miss Healy stood together, waiting tranquilly, but
[A Mother] [4958] Mr. Holohan and Mr. O'Madden Burke came into the room In a
[A Mother] [4960] Kearney and spoke with her earnestly. While they were speaking
[A Mother] [4962] and excited. He spoke volubly, but Mrs. Kearney said curtly at
[A Mother] [4968] audience was clapping and stamping. He appealed to Mr Kearney
[A Mother] [4969] and to Kathleen. But Mr. Kearney continued to stroke his beard
[A Mother] [4970] and Kathleen looked down, moving the point of her new shoe: it
[A Mother] [4983] his head and began to count the links of the gold chain which was
[A Mother] [4984] extended across his waist, smiling and humming random notes to
[A Mother] [4990] panting. The clapping and stamping in the hall were punctuated by
[A Mother] [4992] counted out four into Mrs. Kearney's hand and said she would get
[A Mother] [4997] But Kathleen gathered in her skirt and said: "Now. Mr. Bell," to
[A Mother] [4998] the first item, who was shaking like an aspen. The singer and the
[A Mother] [5000] was a pause of a few seconds: and then the piano was heard.
[A Mother] [5004] voice, with all the old-fashioned mannerisms of intonation and
[A Mother] [5007] and the cheaper parts of the hall made fun of her high wailing
[A Mother] [5008] notes. The first tenor and the contralto, however, brought down the
[A Mother] [5012] theatricals. It was deservedly applauded; and, when it was ended,
[A Mother] [5017] stewards, the baritone, the bass, and Mr. O'Madden Burke. Mr.
[A Mother] [5022] He had been paid his money and wished to be at peace with men.
[A Mother] [5024] into consideration. The stewards and the secretaries debated hotly
[A Mother] [5030] In another corner of the room were Mrs. Kearney and he: husband,
[A Mother] [5031] Mr. Bell, Miss Healy and the young lady who had to recite the
[A Mother] [5033] her scandalously. She had spared neither trouble nor expense and
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5046] great friend of Kathleen's and the Kearneys had often invited her to
[A Mother] [5049] As soon as the first part was ended Mr. Fitzpatrick and Mr.
[A Mother] [5050] Holohan went over to Mrs. Kearney and told her that the other four
[A Mother] [5052] following Tuesday and that, in case her daughter did not play for
[A Mother] [5054] and would pay nothing.
[A Mother] [5063] "And what way did you treat me?" asked Mrs. Kearney.
[A Mother] [5065] Her face was inundated with an angry colour and she looked as if
[A Mother] [5072] "Might I, indeed?... And when I ask when my daughter is going to
[A Mother] [5075] She tossed her head and assumed a haughty voice:
[A Mother] [5085] the door, haggard with rage, arguing with her husband and
[A Mother] [5090] baritone and his accompanist to pass up to the platform. She stood
[A Mother] [5091] still for an instant like an angry stone image and, when the first
[A Mother] [5093] and said to her husband:
[A Mother] [5098] daughter and followed him. As she passed through the doorway
[A Mother] [5099] she stopped and glared into Mr. Holohan's face.
[A Mother] [5106] up and down the room, in order to cool himself for he his skin on
[Grace] [5119] him over. His hat had rolled a few yards away and his clothes were
[Grace] [5120] smeared with the filth and ooze of the floor on which he had lain,
[Grace] [5121] face downwards. His eyes were closed and he breathed with a
[Grace] [5125] These two gentlemen and one of the curates carried him up the
[Grace] [5126] stairs and laid him down again on the floor of the bar. In two
[Grace] [5128] bar asked everyone who he was and who was with him. No one
[Grace] [5136] "And where are they?"
[Grace] [5142] The ring of onlookers distended and closed again elastically. A
[Grace] [5147] His collar was unfastened and his necktie undone. He opened eyes
[Grace] [5148] for an instant, sighed and closed them again. One of gentlemen
[Grace] [5152] opened and an immense constable entered. A crowd which had
[Grace] [5158] head slowly to right and left and from the manager to the person
[Grace] [5161] licked the lead of his pencil and made ready to indite. He asked in
[Grace] [5164] "Who is the man? What's his name and address?"
[Grace] [5167] bystanders. He knelt down promptly beside the injured man and
[Grace] [5169] man washed the blood from the injured man's mouth and then
[Grace] [5173] opened his eyes and looked about him. He looked at the circle of
[Grace] [5174] faces and then, understanding, strove to rise to his feet.
[Grace] [5181] hospital and some of the bystanders gave advice. The battered silk
[Grace] [5201] The new-comer surveyed the deplorable figure before him and
[Grace] [5206] The constable touched his helmet and answered:
[Grace] [5214] and the crowd divided.
[Grace] [5228] The three men left the bar and the crowd sifted through the doors
[Grace] [5232] to the counter and a curate set about removing the traces of blood
[Grace] [5241] The shock and the incipient pain had partly sobered him.
[Grace] [5245] They shook hands. Mr. Kernan was hoisted on to the car and,
[Grace] [5247] his gratitude to the young man and regretted that they could not
[Grace] [5262] The other leaned over the well of the car and peered into Mr.
[Grace] [5263] Kernan's mouth but he could not see. He struck a match and,
[Grace] [5266] the car brought the match to and from the opened mouth. The
[Grace] [5267] lower teeth and gums were covered with clotted blood and a
[Grace] [5273] "Sha, 's nothing," said Mr. Kernan, closing his mouth and pulling
[Grace] [5278] city without a silk hat of some decency and a pair of gaiters. By
[Grace] [5281] Blackwhite, whose memory he evoked at times by legend and
[Grace] [5286] battalion of canisters was drawn up and on the table before the
[Grace] [5289] took a mouthful, drew it up, saturated his palate with it and then
[Grace] [5300] The car halted before a small house on the Glasnevin road and Mr.
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5304] two girls and a boy, conscious of their father helplessness and of
[Grace] [5306] surprised at their manners and at their accents, and his brow grew
[Grace] [5310] "Such a sight! O, he'll do for himself one day and that's the holy
[Grace] [5322] and family. Nice friends! Who was he with tonight, I'd like to
[Grace] [5338] these nights and talk it over."
[Grace] [5340] She saw him to the door. The carman was stamping up and down
[Grace] [5341] the footpath, and swinging his arms to warm himself.
[Grace] [5358] Then she withdrew them, went into the house and emptied her
[Grace] [5362] she had celebrated her silver wedding and renewed her intimacy
[Grace] [5365] to her a not ungallant figure: and she still hurried to the chapel
[Grace] [5366] door whenever a wedding was reported and, seeing the bridal pair,
[Grace] [5369] well-fed man, who was dressed smartly in a frock-coat and
[Grace] [5370] lavender trousers and carried a silk hat gracefully balanced upon
[Grace] [5372] irksome and, later on, when she was beginning to find it
[Grace] [5374] presented to her no insuperable difficulties and for twenty-five
[Grace] [5376] sons were launched. One was in a draper's