Dubliners by James Joyce
But

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 351 occurrences of the word:   but

[The Sisters] [14] the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some
[The Sisters] [22] "No, I wouldn't say he was exactly... but there was something
[The Sisters] [28] rather interesting, talking of faints and worms; but I soon grew
[The Sisters] [32] those ... peculiar cases .... But it's hard to say...."
[The Sisters] [56] black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [94] blankets over my head and tried to think of Christmas. But the grey
[The Sisters] [100] moist with spittle. But then I remembered that it had died of
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [176] But I could not remember the end of the dream.
[The Sisters] [179] mourning. It was after sunset; but the window-panes of the houses
[The Sisters] [195] but I could not gather my thoughts because the old woman's
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [215] take some cream crackers also but I declined because I thought I
[The Sisters] [306] "But still and all he kept on saying that before the summer was
[The Sisters] [337] But still.... They say it was the boy's fault. But poor James was so
[The Sisters] [352] think but there he was, sitting up by himself in the dark in his
[The Sisters] [355] She stopped suddenly as if to listen. I too listened; but there was
[An Encounter] [373] carry it by storm; or we fought a pitched battle on the grass. But,
[An Encounter] [378] house. But he played too fiercely for us who were younger and
[An Encounter] [394] West were remote from my nature but, at least, they opened doors
[An Encounter] [421] Dillon awakened one of my consciences. But when the restraining
[An Encounter] [427] myself. But real adventures, I reflected, do not happen to people
[An Encounter] [439] or someone out of the college; but Mahony asked, very sensibly,
[An Encounter] [470] hour more but still there was no sign of Leo Dillon. Mahony, at
[An Encounter] [490] Smoothing Iron we arranged a siege; but it was a failure because
[An Encounter] [514] bag. We were serious to the point of solemnity, but once during the
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [535] Mahony chased a cat down a lane, but the cat escaped into a wide
[An Encounter] [548] There was nobody but ourselves in the field. When we had lain on
[An Encounter] [603] sweethearts was reasonable. But I disliked the words in his mouth
[An Encounter] [651] boys to be whipped, as he called it; but I remained silent. He began
[An Encounter] [656] unruly there was nothing would do him any good but a good sound
[An Encounter] [679] obliged to go, I bade him good-day. I went up the slope calmly but
[Araby] [764] her, how I could tell her of my confused adoration. But my body
[Araby] [834] an hour, seeing nothing but the brown-clad figure cast by my
[Araby] [844] was sorry she couldn't wait any longer, but it was after eight
[Araby] [878] pressed to the carriage doors; but the porters moved them back,
[Araby] [905] "O, but you did!"
[Araby] [907] "O, but I didn't!"
[Eveline] [950] like their little brown houses but bright brick houses with shining
[Eveline] [955] with his blackthorn stick; but usually little Keogh used to keep nix
[Eveline] [994] But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1008] shillings--and Harry always sent up what he could but the trouble
[Eveline] [1020] and got their meals regularly. It was hard work--a hard life--but
[Eveline] [1057] father. Ernest had been her favourite but she liked Harry too. Her
[Eveline] [1066] Her time was running out but she continued to sit by the window,
[Eveline] [1089] love, too. But she wanted to live. Why should she be unhappy? She
[Eveline] [1124] shouted at to go on but he still called to her. She set her white face
[After the Race] [1175] little life. His father, remonstrative, but covertly proud of the
[After the Race] [1178] than acquaintances as yet but Jimmy found great pleasure in the
[After the Race] [1183] brilliant pianist--but, unfortunately, very poor.
[After the Race] [1206] great sum but Jimmy who, in spite of temporary errors, was at
[After the Race] [1251] accomplishments; but this subtlety of his host was probably lost
[After the Race] [1294] noisiest, but all the men were excited. They got up on a car,
[After the Race] [1335] did not know exactly who was winning but he knew that he was
[After the Race] [1336] losing. But it was his own fault for he frequently mistook his cards
[After the Race] [1338] devils of fellows but he wished they would stop: it was getting late.
[After the Race] [1352] He knew that he would regret in the morning but at present he was
[Two Gallants] [1384] and his jauntily slung waterproof expressed youth. But his figure
[Two Gallants] [1403] leech but, in spite of this reputation, his adroitness and eloquence
[Two Gallants] [1410] he achieved the stern task of living, but his name was vaguely
[Two Gallants] [1428] way. But she's up to the dodge."
[Two Gallants] [1434] But she thinks I'm a bit of class, you know."
[Two Gallants] [1465] at some of the passing girls but Lenehan's gaze was fixed on the
[Two Gallants] [1486] interpretation of raillery. But Corley had not a subtle mind.
[Two Gallants] [1500] But Lenehan could well believe it; he nodded gravely.
[Two Gallants] [1550] "But tell me," said Lenehan again, "are you sure you can bring it
[Two Gallants] [1562] wanted. A little tact was necessary. But Corley's brow was soon
[Two Gallants] [1672] of no way of passing them but to keep on walking. He turned to the
[Two Gallants] [1717] heart against the world. But all hope had not left him. He felt
[Two Gallants] [1755] friend's situation as well as those of his own. But the memory of
[The Boarding House] [1824] Spring Gardens. But as soon as his father-in-law was dead Mr.
[The Boarding House] [1876] corn-factor's office but, as a disreputable sheriff's man used to
[The Boarding House] [1882] course, flirted with the young men but Mrs. Mooney, who was a
[The Boarding House] [1890] Polly knew that she was being watched, but still her mother's
[The Boarding House] [1893] understanding but, though people in the house began to talk of the
[The Boarding House] [1901] but with a fresh breeze blowing. All the windows of the boarding
[The Boarding House] [1922] her awkward but also because she did not wish it to be thought that
[The Boarding House] [1944] had his moment of pleasure, but the girl has to bear the brunt.
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1969] made two attempts to shave but his hand had been so unsteady that
[The Boarding House] [1978] but marry her or run away? He could not brazen it out. The affair
[The Boarding House] [1988] existence of God to his companions in public- houses. But that was
[The Boarding House] [1990] Reynolds's Newspaper every week but he attended to his religious
[The Boarding House] [1992] money enough to settle down on; it was not that. But the family
[The Boarding House] [1998] But what would grammar matter if he really loved her? He could
[The Boarding House] [2041] But delirium passes. He echoed her phrase, applying it to himself:
[The Boarding House] [2043] back. But the sin was there; even his sense of honour told him that
[The Boarding House] [2071] harm meant: but Jack kept shouting at him that if any fellow tried
[A Little Cloud] [2116] because, though he was but slightly under the average stature, he
[A Little Cloud] [2142] down from the bookshelf and read out something to his wife. But
[A Little Cloud] [2160] He had never been in Corless's but he knew the value of the name.
[A Little Cloud] [2186] flight. But nobody denied him talent. There was always a certain...
[A Little Cloud] [2196] That was Ignatius Gallaher all out; and, damn it, you couldn't but
[A Little Cloud] [2212] original? He was not sure what idea he wished to express but the
[A Little Cloud] [2223] temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by
[A Little Cloud] [2227] crowd but he might appeal to a little circle of kindred minds. The
[A Little Cloud] [2245] moments. He looked about him, but his sight was confused by the
[A Little Cloud] [2249] make his errand appear serious), but when his sight cleared a little
[A Little Cloud] [2298] "But Hogan has a good sit, hasn't he?"
[A Little Cloud] [2333] it is beautiful.... But it's the life of Paris; that's the thing. Ah, there's
[A Little Cloud] [2350] observed before. But perhaps it was only the result of living in
[A Little Cloud] [2411] him), but of others he had had personal experience. He spared
[A Little Cloud] [2427] nature.... But tell me something about yourself. Hogan told me you
[A Little Cloud] [2469] didn't meet earlier. But I must leave tomorrow night."
[A Little Cloud] [2479] "But who knows?" said Ignatius Gallaher considerately. "Next year
[A Little Cloud] [2548] betrayed himself; but, though the colour had heightened in his
[A Little Cloud] [2570] "But I'm in no hurry. They can wait. I don't fancy tying myself up
[A Little Cloud] [2578] arms. To save money they kept no servant but Annie's young sister
[A Little Cloud] [2580] the evening to help. But Monica had gone home long ago. It was a
[A Little Cloud] [2584] him short answers. She said she would do without any tea but
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2605] home Annie kissed him and said it was very pretty and stylish; but
[A Little Cloud] [2608] first she wanted to take it back but when she tried it on she was
[A Little Cloud] [2616] pretty. But he found something mean in it. Why was it so
[A Little Cloud] [2653] tried to hush it: but it would not be hushed. He began to rock it to
[A Little Cloud] [2654] and fro in his arms but its wailing cry grew keener. He rocked it
[A Little Cloud] [2673] He tried to soothe it but it sobbed more convulsively. He looked at
[Counterparts] [2747] "But Mr. Shelley said, sir----"
[Counterparts] [2792] the ink but he continued to stare stupidly at the last words he had
[Counterparts] [2803] The chief clerk glanced at the hat-rack, but, seeing the row
[Counterparts] [2860] respectfully but neither Mr. Alleyne nor Miss Delacour took any
[Counterparts] [2872] copy. But his head was not clear and his mind wandered away to
[Counterparts] [2874] punches. He struggled on with his copy, but when the clock struck
[Counterparts] [2934] abject apology to Mr. Alleyne for his impertinence but he knew
[Counterparts] [2941] himself this time. Could he not keep his tongue in his cheek? But
[Counterparts] [2946] money, but sure Higgins never had anything for himself. A man
[Counterparts] [2962] crown! but the consignor held out for six shillings; and in the end
[Counterparts] [2986] but, as the retort was after the manner of the liberal shepherds in
[Counterparts] [2991] Just as they were naming their poisons who should come in but
[Counterparts] [3003] money but neither of the other two seemed to have any; so the
[Counterparts] [3017] have an Apollinaris too; but the boys told Tim to make theirs hot.
[Counterparts] [3022] he and Leonard would go, but that Farrington wouldn't go because
[Counterparts] [3034] of bitter this time. Funds were getting low but they had enough to
[Counterparts] [3050] would look back at him, but he was disappointed. He cursed his
[Counterparts] [3165] but the man followed him and caught him by the coat. The little
[Counterparts] [3166] boy looked about him wildly but, seeing no way of escape, fell
[Clay] [3187] barmbracks seemed uncut; but if you went closer you would see
[Clay] [3191] Maria was a very, very small person indeed but she had a very long
[Clay] [3219] Often he had wanted her to go and live with them;-but she would
[Clay] [3225] "Mamma is mamma but Maria is my proper mother."
[Clay] [3229] such a bad opinion of Protestants but now she thought they were
[Clay] [3230] very nice people, a little quiet and serious, but still very nice
[Clay] [3235] one thing she didn't like and that was the tracts on the walks; but
[Clay] [3260] But wasn't Maria glad when the women had finished their tea and
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3281] Joe were not speaking. They were always falling out now but when
[Clay] [3282] they were boys together they used to be the best of friends: but
[Clay] [3286] among the crowds. She went into Downes's cake-shop but the shop
[Clay] [3293] decided to buy some plumcake but Downes's plumcake had not
[Clay] [3298] That made Maria blush and smile at the young lady; but the young
[Clay] [3305] because none of the young men seemed to notice her but an elderly
[Clay] [3332] But Maria said she had brought something special for papa and
[Clay] [3335] pockets of her waterproof and then on the hallstand but nowhere
[Clay] [3337] eaten it--by mistake, of course--but the children all said no and
[Clay] [3347] But Joe said it didn't matter and made her sit down by the fire. He
[Clay] [3351] the answer he had made but she said that the manager must have
[Clay] [3358] did they expect Maria to crack nuts without a nutcracker. But
[Clay] [3363] anything: but Joe insisted.
[Clay] [3367] Alphy. But Joe cried that God might strike him stone dead if ever
[Clay] [3371] blood but Joe said that Alphy was no brother of his and there was
[Clay] [3372] nearly being a row on the head of it. But Joe said he would not
[Clay] [3424] But I also dreamt, which pleased me most,
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[A Painful Case] [3472] character; but there was no harshness in the eyes which, looking at
[A Painful Case] [3474] a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often
[A Painful Case] [3498] sake but conceded nothing further to the conventions which
[A Painful Case] [3500] circumstances he would rob his hank but, as these circumstances
[A Painful Case] [3518] began with a defiant note but was confused by what seemed a
[A Painful Case] [3528] husband but her tone was not such as to make the allusion a
[A Painful Case] [3595] was cold autumn weather but in spite of the cold they wandered up
[A Painful Case] [3599] towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that,
[A Painful Case] [3641] read it not aloud, but moving his lips as a priest does when he
[A Painful Case] [3666] her and shouted, but, before he could reach her, she was caught by
[A Painful Case] [3735] reared. But that she could have sunk so low! Was it possible he
[A Painful Case] [3749] The proprietor served him obsequiously but did not venture to talk.
[A Painful Case] [3797] out of sight; but still he heard in his ears the laborious drone of the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3813] but, as he set himself to fan the fire again, his crouching shadow
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3825] tobacco for a cigarette into a shapely cylinder but when spoken to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3855] part of the ward but, as the weather was inclement and his boots
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3894] But, sure, it's worse whenever he gets a job; he drinks it all."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3944] "It isn't but he has it, anyway. Not like the other tinker."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3967] halfpence. But it's labour produces everything. The workingman is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4027] going to vote.' But I think he'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4043] shoeboy, but he said: 'Oh, now, Mr. Henchy, when I see work
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4057] "But is that a fact?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4061] to buy a waistcoat or a trousers--moya! But Tricky Dicky's little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4081] man said anything, but, just as the door was closing, Mr. O'Connor,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4106] "Poor old Larry Hynes! Many a good turn he did in his day! But I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4108] understand a fellow being hard up, but what I can't understand is a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4128] "O, but I know it for a fact," said Mr. Henchy. "They're Castle
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4130] above that.... But there's a certain little nobleman with a cock-eye
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4168] "He's round at the Black Eagle," said Mr. Henchy. "But won't you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4179] "No, but the stairs is so dark."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4204] We haven't many of them, thank God! but we have a few.... He's an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4222] he send up a dozen of stout. I asked him again now, but he was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4351] chap, of course), but he's not worth a damn as a canvasser. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4399] had been a canvasser for Wilkins, the Conservative, but when the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4415] old Conservative! 'But isn't your candidate a Nationalist?' said he.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4435] "But look here, John," said Mr. O'Connor. "Why should we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4449] "But after all now," said Mr. Lyons argumentatively, "King
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4457] "That's all very fine," said Mr. Lyons. "But look at the case of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4498] Mr. Hynes sat on the side of the table near Mr. Lyons but said
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4514] they were alluding, but, after reflecting a while, he said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4551] He dreamed (alas, 'twas but a dream!)
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4552] Of Liberty: but as he strove
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4572] But Erin, list, his spirit may
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4586] Pok! The cork flew out of Mr. Hynes' bottle, but Mr. Hynes
[A Mother] [4605] the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in
[A Mother] [4615] a brilliant life. But the young men whom she met were ordinary
[A Mother] [4625] wear better than a romantic person, but she never put her own
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4688] Kathleen's dress. It cost a pretty penny; but there are occasions
[A Mother] [4733] their best, but really they are not good."
[A Mother] [4735] Mr. Holohan admitted that the artistes were no good but the
[A Mother] [4738] Kearney said nothing, but, as the mediocre items followed one
[A Mother] [4747] The concert on Thursday night was better attended, but Mrs.
[A Mother] [4762] "But, of course, that doesn't alter the contract," she said. "The
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4786] evening. Mrs. Kearney was somewhat reassured, but be thought
[A Mother] [4831] and was warmly welcomed by the gallery; but, unfortunately, he
[A Mother] [4872] shadow took her faded dress into shelter but fell revengefully into
[A Mother] [4879] them amiably. She wanted to be on good terms with them but,
[A Mother] [4916] him considerably but he remained leaning against the mantelpiece.
[A Mother] [4918] enough to suspect one reason for her politeness but young enough
[A Mother] [4949] ready with his music but the accompanist made no sign. Evidently
[A Mother] [4954] the baritone and Miss Healy stood together, waiting tranquilly, but
[A Mother] [4962] and excited. He spoke volubly, but Mrs. Kearney said curtly at
[A Mother] [4969] and to Kathleen. But Mr. Kearney continued to stroke his beard
[A Mother] [4981] The baritone had not seen her but he had been told that she was
[A Mother] [4997] But Kathleen gathered in her skirt and said: "Now. Mr. Bell," to
[A Mother] [5037] they could ride roughshod over her. But she would show them
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[A Mother] [5042] the sake of the artistes. But what else could she do? She appealed
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[A Mother] [5088] approach her. But Miss Healy had kindly consented to play one or
[A Mother] [5103] "But I'm done with you," said Mr. Holohan.
[Grace] [5117] lift him up: but he was quite helpless. He lay curled up at the foot
[Grace] [5129] knew who he was but one of the curates said he had served the
[Grace] [5263] Kernan's mouth but he could not see. He struck a match and,
[Grace] [5294] intersected the arc of his friend's decline, but Mr. Kernan's decline
[Grace] [5316] domestic quarrels, as well as many small, but opportune loans,
[Grace] [5325] Mr. Power shook his head but said nothing.
[Grace] [5328] offer you. But if you wait a minute I'll send round to Fogarty's, at
[Grace] [5397] disorder of the room, but at the same time looked at them a little
[Grace] [5403] Power's, but its development was entrusted to Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5432] and, but that she did not wish to seem bloody-minded, would have
[Grace] [5439] was bounded by her kitchen, but, if she was put to it, she could
[Grace] [5466] "Pain? Not much," answered Mr. Kernan. "But it's so sickening. I
[Grace] [5509] its members duly qualified themselves as bona fide travellers. But
[Grace] [5551] straight-laced, but he could not forget that Mr. M'Coy had recently
[Grace] [5593] Everyone laughed again: but Mr. Kernan was somewhat indignant
[Grace] [5644] "But we mustn't be late," said Mr. Power earnestly, "because it is
[Grace] [5697] to his mind, but, understanding that some spiritual agencies were
[Grace] [5700] conversation for a long while, but listened, with an air of calm
[Grace] [5718] time or other but the Jesuit Order was never once reformed. It
[Grace] [5805] "But he's an Orangeman, Crofton, isn't he?" said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5811] said, but our belief is the same. Struck me as very well put."
[Grace] [5826] "But, of course," said Mr. Cunningham quietly and effectively,
[Grace] [5938] course, not our present man, or his predecessor, but some of the
[Grace] [5943] "O, of course, there were some bad lots... But the astonishing thing
[Grace] [6019] solemn company. She did not disturb the silence, but leaned over
[Grace] [6076] Mr. Power said nothing. He felt completely out-generalled. But a
[Grace] [6091] confession, and... all that business. But... no candles! No, damn it
[Grace] [6148] but firmly, with the other hand.
[Grace] [6176] Jesus Christ. But, he told his hearers, the text had seemed to him
[Grace] [6190] no extravagant purpose; but as a man of the world speaking to his
[Grace] [6201] our failings. But one thing only, he said, he would ask of his
[Grace] [6207] But if, as might happen, there were some discrepancies, to admit
[Grace] [6211] wrong. But, with God's grace, I will rectify this and this. I will set
[The Dead] [6221] for her she had not to attend to the ladies also. But Miss Kate and
[The Dead] [6251] sirloins, three-shilling tea and the best bottled stout. But Lily
[The Dead] [6253] her three mistresses. They were fussy, that was all. But the only
[The Dead] [6262] manage him. Freddy Malins always came late, but they wondered
[The Dead] [6271] "I'll engage they did," said Gabriel, "but they forget that my wife
[The Dead] [6405] "But as for Gretta there," said Gabriel, "she'd walk home in the
[The Dead] [6413] poor child! And she simply hates the sight of it!... O, but you'll
[The Dead] [6423] to put them on, but I wouldn't. The next thing he'll buy me will be
[The Dead] [6446] "It's nothing very wonderful, but Gretta thinks it very funny
[The Dead] [6449] "But tell me, Gabriel," said Aunt Kate, with brisk tact. "Of course,
[The Dead] [6466] Gabriel was about to ask his aunt some questions on this point, but
[The Dead] [6509] He did not finish his sentence, but, seeing that Aunt Kate was out
[The Dead] [6571] two dances, but really we're so short of ladies tonight."
[The Dead] [6575] "But I've a nice partner for you, Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor. I'll
[The Dead] [6615] Gabriel's brows were dark but he raised them quickly and
[The Dead] [6621] made him take the pledge on New Year's Eve. But come on,
[The Dead] [6633] offer aside impatiently but Mr. Browne, having first called Freddy
[The Dead] [6648] drawing-room. He liked music but the piece she was playing had
[The Dead] [6693] refreshment-room at the beginning of the piece but had come back
[The Dead] [6728] for which he was paid fifteen shillings. But that did not make him
[The Dead] [6737] politics. But they were friends of many years' standing and their
[The Dead] [6752] out the secret: but she liked the review immensely. Then she said
[The Dead] [6764] "But you will come, won't you?" said Miss Ivors, laying her arm
[The Dead] [6774] "But where?" asked Miss Ivors.
[The Dead] [6816] expression on her face. But when they met in the long chain he
[The Dead] [6837] was an enthusiast but there was a time for all things. Perhaps he
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6913] now on the wane among us may have had its faults but for my part
[The Dead] [6975] simply thrown away in that choir. But she never would be said by
[The Dead] [6991] "I know all about the honour of God, Mary Jane, but I think it's not
[The Dead] [6995] good of the Church if the pope does it. But it's not just, Mary Jane,
[The Dead] [6999] in defence of her sister for it was a sore subject with her but Mary
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7025] and Mary Jane trying to persuade Miss Ivors to stay for supper. But
[The Dead] [7030] "But only for ten minutes, Molly," said Mrs. Conroy. "That won't
[The Dead] [7040] "Ever so much, I assure you," said Miss Ivors, "but you really must
[The Dead] [7043] "But how can you get home?" asked Mrs. Conroy.
[The Dead] [7052] But Miss Ivors broke away from them.
[The Dead] [7066] departure. But she did not seem to be in ill humour: she had gone
[The Dead] [7120] but Aunt Kate had said that plain roast goose without any apple
[The Dead] [7132] her supper but Aunt Kate and Aunt Julia were still toddling round
[The Dead] [7135] them to sit down and eat their suppers and so did Gabriel but they
[The Dead] [7157] of the company but Miss Furlong thought she had a rather vulgar
[The Dead] [7178] Mignon. Of course it was very fine, she said, but it made her think
[The Dead] [7203] "Maybe so," said Mr. Browne. "But I may tell you I doubt it
[The Dead] [7209] was only one tenor. To please me, I mean. But I suppose none of
[The Dead] [7221] hearing of old Parkinson but he's too far back for me."
[The Dead] [7266] "Yes, but why?" asked Mr. Browne.
[The Dead] [7274] "I like that idea very much but wouldn't a comfortable spring bed
[The Dead] [7288] Bartell D'Arcy refused to take either but one of his neighbours
[The Dead] [7315] very pleasing task but a task for which I am afraid my poor powers
[The Dead] [7320] "But, however that may be, I can only ask you tonight to take the
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7359] misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in
[The Dead] [7375] "But yet," continued Gabriel, his voice falling into a softer
[The Dead] [7399] Aunt Julia did not understand but she looked up, smiling, at
[The Dead] [7411] surprise and a revelation to us all tonight, or, last but not least,
[The Dead] [7481] "But tell him to come in, Mary Jane, and close the door. I hope to
[The Dead] [7538] mill. That was all very well; but now comes the tragic part about
[The Dead] [7624] her face but he could see the terra-cotta and salmon-pink panels of
[The Dead] [7628] also. But he could hear little save the noise of laughter and dispute
[The Dead] [7647] Gabriel said nothing but pointed up the stairs towards where his
[The Dead] [7666] Mary Jane brushed past the others and ran to the staircase, but
[The Dead] [7707] "But poor Mr. D'Arcy doesn't like the snow," said Aunt Kate,
[The Dead] [7725] "It's called The Lass of Aughrim," said Mr. D'Arcy, "but I couldn't
[The Dead] [7771] but Gabriel's eyes were still bright with happiness. The blood went
[The Dead] [7793] But the man could not hear with the noise of the furnace. It was
[The Dead] [7855] happy that she was his, proud of her grace and wifely carriage. But
[The Dead] [7885] muttered apology, but Gabriel cut him short.
[The Dead] [7891] The porter took up his candle again, but slowly, for he was
[The Dead] [7948] her. But he said:
[The Dead] [8070] He tried to keep up his tone of cold interrogation, but his voice
[The Dead] [8089] vague world. But he shook himself free of it with an effort of
[The Dead] [8092] warm and moist: it did not respond to his touch, but he continued
[The Dead] [8131] his death in the rain. But he said he did not want to live. I can see
[The Dead] [8164] face was no longer beautiful, but he knew that it was no longer the
[The Dead] [8195] himself towards any woman, but he knew that such a feeling must
[The Dead] [8200] He was conscious of, but could not apprehend, their wayward and