Dubliners by James Joyce
Dublin

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

This is a hypertextual, self-referential edition of
Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

Click on any word to see its occurrences in the text;
click on line numbers to go to that line;
click on chapter names to go to that chapter;
or search using the form below.
Search terms can contain spaces and punctuation.

The concordance for Dubliners ordered alphanumerically,
and listed in order of word frequency. Click here for more texts.

There are 38 occurrences of the word:   Dublin

[After the Race] [1130] THE cars came scudding in towards Dublin, running evenly like
[After the Race] [1165] opening shops in Dublin and in the suburbs he had made his
[After the Race] [1168] rich enough to be alluded to in the Dublin newspapers as a
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[The Boarding House] [1980] hear of it. Dublin is such a small city: everyone knows everyone
[A Little Cloud] [2156] the gaunt spectral mansions in which the old nobility of Dublin
[A Little Cloud] [2203] away. You could do nothing in Dublin. As he crossed Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2277] better since I landed again in dear dirty Dublin.... Here you are,
[A Little Cloud] [2382] insistence--"I mean, compared with London or Dublin?"
[A Little Cloud] [2419] Dublin where nothing is known of such things."
[Clay] [3228] Dublin by Lamplight laundry, and she liked it. She used to have
[A Painful Case] [3439] because he found all the other suburbs of Dublin mean, modern
[A Painful Case] [3442] the shallow river on which Dublin is built. The lofty walls of his
[A Painful Case] [3469] tint of Dublin streets. On his long and rather large head grew dry
[A Painful Case] [3531] captain of a mercantile boat plying between Dublin and Holland;
[A Painful Case] [3563] social revolution, he told her, would be likely to strike Dublin for
[A Painful Case] [3572] He went often to her little cottage outside Dublin; often they spent
[A Painful Case] [3649] Today at the City of Dublin Hospital the Deputy Coroner (in the
[A Painful Case] [3679] Dr. Halpin, assistant house surgeon of the City of Dublin Hospital,
[A Painful Case] [3698] wife. He was not in Dublin at the time of the accident as he had
[A Painful Case] [3783] looked along the river towards Dublin, the lights of which burned
[A Painful Case] [3794] towards Dublin. Beyond the river he saw a goods train winding out
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3969] working-man is not going to drag the honour of Dublin in the mud
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4429] an influx of money into this country. The citizens of Dublin will
[A Mother] [4601] been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his
[A Mother] [4782] Little boys were sent out into the principal streets of Dublin early
[A Mother] [5020] in Dublin after that, he said. The baritone was asked what did he
[A Mother] [5041] farthing she would make Dublin ring. Of course she was sorry for
[Grace] [5293] Constabulary Office in Dublin Castle. The arc of his social rise
[The Dead] [6545] had assumed a very low Dublin accent so that the young ladies,
[The Dead] [6576] get him to sing later on. All Dublin is raving about him."
[The Dead] [6830] married daughter in Glasgow and came to Dublin on a visit once a
[The Dead] [7180] the old Italian companies that used to come to Dublin--Tietjens,
[The Dead] [7183] something like singing to be heard in Dublin. He told too of how
[The Dead] [7391] --the Three Graces of the Dublin musical world."
[The Dead] [7491] "Teddy will have all the cabs in Dublin out," he said.
[The Dead] [8115] see him so I wrote him a letter saying I was going up to Dublin and