Dubliners by James Joyce
Father

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 52 occurrences of the word:   Father

[The Sisters] [41] "Father Flynn."
[The Sisters] [236] "Father O'Rourke was in with him a Tuesday and anointed him and
[The Sisters] [269] about the Mass in the chapel. Only for Father O'Rourke I don't
[The Sisters] [310] carriages that makes no noise that Father O'Rourke told him about,
[The Sisters] [350] and the clerk and Father O'Rourke and another priest that was
[An Encounter] [399] at school. One day when Father Butler was hearing the four pages
[An Encounter] [408] everyone assumed an innocent face. Father Butler turned over the
[An Encounter] [438] Pigeon House. Leo Dillon was afraid we might meet Father Butler
[An Encounter] [440] what would Father Butler be doing out at the Pigeon House. We
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[Eveline] [954] too grown up. Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field
[Eveline] [956] and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to
[Eveline] [957] have been rather happy then. Her father was not so bad then; and
[Eveline] [972] Alacoque. He had been a school friend of her father. Whenever he
[Eveline] [973] showed the photograph to a visitor her father used to pass it with a
[Eveline] [1009] was to get any money from her father. He said she used to
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1057] father. Ernest had been her favourite but she liked Harry too. Her
[Eveline] [1058] father was becoming old lately, she noticed; he would miss her.
[Eveline] [1063] remembered her father putting on her mothers bonnet to make the
[Eveline] [1075] away and given sixpence. She remembered her father strutting
[After the Race] [1162] moustache and rather innocent-looking grey eyes. His father, who
[After the Race] [1175] little life. His father, remonstrative, but covertly proud of the
[After the Race] [1181] father agreed) was well worth knowing, even if he had not been
[After the Race] [1219] business matters and in this case it had been his father who had
[After the Race] [1247] equation to the bows of his dress tie, his father may have felt even
[After the Race] [1249] unpurchaseable. His father, therefore, was unusually friendly with
[After the Race] [1273] influences, felt the buried zeal of his father wake to life within
[The Boarding House] [1824] Spring Gardens. But as soon as his father-in-law was dead Mr.
[The Boarding House] [1994] father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a
[A Painful Case] [3614] from concerts lest he should meet her. His father died; the junior
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4032] mentioned Father Burke's name. I think it'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4054] hell! I suppose he forgets the time his little old father kept the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4105] "His father was a decent, respectable man," Mr. Henchy admitted.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4156] "O Father Keon!" said Mr. Henchy, jumping up from his chair. "Is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4159] "O, no, no, no!" said Father Keon quickly, pursing his lips as if he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4164] "No, no, no!" said Father Keon, speaking in a discreet, indulgent,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4171] "No, no, thank you. It was just a little business matter," said Father
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4241] I'm thinking seriously of becoming a City Father myself. What do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4254] "Yes. And I'll make Father Keon my private chaplain. We'll have a
[A Mother] [4632] strong rum punch. For his part, he was a model father. By paying a
[Grace] [5304] two girls and a boy, conscious of their father helplessness and of
[Grace] [5754] "O, it's just a retreat, you know," said Mr. Cunningham. "Father
[Grace] [5759] "Father Purdon? Father Purdon?" said the invalid.
[Grace] [5775] "Father Tom Burke, that was the boy!"
[Grace] [5777] "O, Father Tom Burke," said Mr. Cunningham, "that was a born
[Grace] [5814] be crowds of Protestants in the chapel where Father Tom was
[Grace] [6158] Father Purdon knelt down, turned towards the red speck of light
[Grace] [6172] Father Purdon developed the text with resonant assurance. It was
[The Dead] [7012] were in Julia's place I'd tell that Father Healey straight up to his