Dubliners by James Joyce
I

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 688 occurrences of the word:   I

[The Sisters] [4] Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and
[The Sisters] [5] studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had
[The Sisters] [7] dead, I thought, I would see the reflection of candles on the
[The Sisters] [8] darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head
[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [10] world," and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were
[The Sisters] [11] true. Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to
[The Sisters] [15] maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed
[The Sisters] [18] Old Cotter was sitting at the fire, smoking, when I came
[The Sisters] [22] "No, I wouldn't say he was exactly... but there was something
[The Sisters] [28] rather interesting, talking of faints and worms; but I soon grew
[The Sisters] [31] "I have my own theory about it," he said. "I think it was one of
[The Sisters] [39] "Who?" said I.
[The Sisters] [47] I knew that I was under observation so I continued eating as if the
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [56] black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by
[The Sisters] [60] "I wouldn't like children of mine," he said, "to have too much to
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [67] and not be... Am I right, Jack?"
[The Sisters] [71] take exercise. Why, when I was a nipper every morning of my life
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [87] I crammed my mouth with stirabout for fear I might give utterance
[The Sisters] [90] It was late when I fell asleep. Though I was angry with old Cotter
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [92] from his unfinished sentences. In the dark of my room I imagined
[The Sisters] [93] that I saw again the heavy grey face of the paralytic. I drew the
[The Sisters] [95] face still followed me. It murmured, and I understood that it
[The Sisters] [96] desired to confess something. I felt my soul receding into some
[The Sisters] [97] pleasant and vicious region; and there again I found it waiting for
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [100] moist with spittle. But then I remembered that it had died of
[The Sisters] [101] paralysis and I felt that I too was smiling feebly as if to absolve the
[The Sisters] [104] The next morning after breakfast I went down to look at the little
[The Sisters] [112] on the crape. I also approached and read:
[The Sisters] [117] R. I. P.
[The Sisters] [119] The reading of the card persuaded me that he was dead and I was
[The Sisters] [120] disturbed to find myself at check. Had he not been dead I would
[The Sisters] [125] stupefied doze. It was always I who emptied the packet into his
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [137] knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street,
[The Sisters] [138] reading all the theatrical advertisements in the shop-windows as I
[The Sisters] [139] went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a
[The Sisters] [140] mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a
[The Sisters] [141] sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his
[The Sisters] [142] death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night
[The Sisters] [152] mysterious were certain institutions of the Church which I had
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [156] found in himself the courage to undertake them; and I was not
[The Sisters] [160] intricate questions. Often when I thought of this I could make no
[The Sisters] [164] learn by heart; and, as I pattered, he used to smile pensively and
[The Sisters] [169] acquaintance before I knew him well.
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[The Sisters] [172] tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream. I
[The Sisters] [173] remembered that I had noticed long velvet curtains and a swinging
[The Sisters] [174] lamp of antique fashion. I felt that I had been very far away, in
[The Sisters] [175] some land where the customs were strange--in Persia, I thought....
[The Sisters] [176] But I could not remember the end of the dream.
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [191] I went in on tiptoe. The room through the lace end of the blind was
[The Sisters] [194] and we three knelt down at the foot of the bed. I pretended to pray
[The Sisters] [195] but I could not gather my thoughts because the old woman's
[The Sisters] [196] mutterings distracted me. I noticed how clumsily her skirt was
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [209] we found Eliza seated in his arm-chair in state. I groped my way
[The Sisters] [215] take some cream crackers also but I declined because I thought I
[The Sisters] [255] to him, I must say."
[The Sisters] [269] about the Mass in the chapel. Only for Father O'Rourke I don't
[The Sisters] [287] wouldn't hear him in the house any more than now. Still, I know
[The Sisters] [292] "I know that," said Eliza. "I won't be bringing him in his cup of
[The Sisters] [299] "Mind you, I noticed there was something queer coming over him
[The Sisters] [330] I approached the table and tasted my sherry and then returned
[The Sisters] [336] course, they say it was all right, that it contained nothing, I mean.
[The Sisters] [340] "And was that it?" said my aunt. "I heard something...."
[The Sisters] [355] She stopped suddenly as if to listen. I too listened; but there was
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[An Encounter] [393] I was one. The adventures related in the literature of the Wild
[An Encounter] [395] of escape. I liked better some American detective stories which
[An Encounter] [414] it, I suppose, was some wretched fellow who writes these things
[An Encounter] [416] stuff. I could understand it if you were ... National School boys.
[An Encounter] [417] Now, Dillon, I advise you strongly, get at your work or..."
[An Encounter] [422] influence of the school was at a distance I began to hunger again
[An Encounter] [426] in the morning because I wanted real adventures to happen to
[An Encounter] [427] myself. But real adventures, I reflected, do not happen to people
[An Encounter] [430] The summer holidays were near at hand when I made up my mind
[An Encounter] [432] With Leo Dillon and a boy named Mahony I planned a day's
[An Encounter] [441] were reassured: and I brought the first stage of the plot to an end
[An Encounter] [449] That night I slept badly. In the morning I was firstcomer to the
[An Encounter] [450] bridge as I lived nearest. I hid my books in the long grass near the
[An Encounter] [453] first week of June. I sat up on the coping of the bridge admiring
[An Encounter] [454] my frail canvas shoes which I had diligently pipeclayed overnight
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [460] to an air in my head. I was very happy.
[An Encounter] [462] When I had been sitting there for five or ten minutes I saw
[An Encounter] [466] explained some improvements which he had made in it. I asked
[An Encounter] [473] "Come along. I knew Fatty'd funk it."
[An Encounter] [475] "And his sixpence...?" I said.
[An Encounter] [485] at us, he proposed that we should charge them. I objected that the
[An Encounter] [506] right skit to run away to sea on one of those big ships and even I,
[An Encounter] [518] Norwegian vessel. I went to the stern and tried to decipher the
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [520] foreign sailors to see had any of them green eyes for I had some
[An Encounter] [543] regretfully at his catapult and I had to suggest going home by train
[An Encounter] [549] the bank for some time without speaking I saw a man approaching
[An Encounter] [550] from the far end of the field. I watched him lazily as I chewed one
[An Encounter] [561] ground with his stick, so slowly that I thought he was looking for
[An Encounter] [574] Walter Scott and Lord Lytton. I pretended that I had read every
[An Encounter] [577] "Ah, I can see you are a bookworm like myself. Now," he added,
[An Encounter] [585] which agitated and pained me because I was afraid the man would
[An Encounter] [586] think I was as stupid as Mahony. The man, however, only smiled. I
[An Encounter] [590] many I had. I answered that I had none. He did not believe me and
[An Encounter] [591] said he was sure I must have one. I was silent.
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [603] sweethearts was reasonable. But I disliked the words in his mouth
[An Encounter] [604] and I wondered why he shivered once or twice as if he feared
[An Encounter] [605] something or felt a sudden chill. As he proceeded I noticed that his
[An Encounter] [619] voice. I continued to gaze towards the foot of the slope, listening
[An Encounter] [624] and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking
[An Encounter] [627] minutes I heard Mahony exclaim:
[An Encounter] [629] "I say! Look what he's doing!"
[An Encounter] [631] As I neither answered nor raised my eyes Mahony exclaimed
[An Encounter] [634] "I say... He's a queer old josser!"
[An Encounter] [636] "In case he asks us for our names," I said "let you be Murphy and I'll
[An Encounter] [639] We said nothing further to each other. I was still considering
[An Encounter] [640] whether I would go away or not when the man came back and sat
[An Encounter] [643] pursued her across the field. The man and I watched the chase. The
[An Encounter] [649] a very rough boy and asked did he get whipped often at school. I
[An Encounter] [651] boys to be whipped, as he called it; but I remained silent. He began
[An Encounter] [658] what he wanted was to get a nice warm whipping. I was surprised
[An Encounter] [659] at this sentiment and involuntarily glanced up at his face. As I did
[An Encounter] [660] so I met the gaze of a pair of bottle-green eyes peering at me from
[An Encounter] [661] under a twitching forehead. I turned my eyes away again.
[An Encounter] [674] seemed to plead with me that I should understand him.
[An Encounter] [676] I waited till his monologue paused again. Then I stood up abruptly.
[An Encounter] [677] Lest I should betray my agitation I delayed a few moments
[An Encounter] [678] pretending to fix my shoe properly and then, saying that I was
[An Encounter] [679] obliged to go, I bade him good-day. I went up the slope calmly but
[An Encounter] [681] the ankles. When I reached the top of the slope I turned round and,
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[An Encounter] [687] of my paltry stratagem. I had to call the name again before
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [705] littered with old useless papers. Among these I found a few
[Araby] [708] Memoirs of Vidocq. I liked the last best because its leaves were
[Araby] [710] apple-tree and a few straggling bushes under one of which I found
[Araby] [735] teased her before he obeyed and I stood by the railings looking at
[Araby] [739] Every morning I lay on the floor in the front parlour watching her
[Araby] [741] that I could not be seen. When she came out on the doorstep my
[Araby] [742] heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I
[Araby] [744] the point at which our ways diverged, I quickened my pace and
[Araby] [745] passed her. This happened morning after morning. I had never
[Araby] [750] romance. On Saturday evenings when my aunt went marketing I
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [759] to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I
[Araby] [760] myself did not understand. My eyes were often full of tears (I
[Araby] [762] pour itself out into my bosom. I thought little of the future. I did
[Araby] [763] not know whether I would ever speak to her or not or, if I spoke to
[Araby] [764] her, how I could tell her of my confused adoration. But my body
[Araby] [768] One evening I went into the back drawing-room in which the priest
[Araby] [770] house. Through one of the broken panes I heard the rain impinge
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Araby] [774] to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip
[Araby] [775] from them, I pressed the palms of my hands together until they
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Araby] [780] me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It
[Araby] [783] "And why can't you?" I asked.
[Araby] [788] fighting for their caps and I was alone at the railings. She held one
[Araby] [797] "If I go," I said, "I will bring you something."
[Araby] [800] thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious
[Araby] [801] intervening days. I chafed against the work of school. At night in
[Araby] [803] me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [807] it was not some Freemason affair. I answered few questions in
[Araby] [808] class. I watched my master's face pass from amiability to
[Araby] [809] sternness; he hoped I was not beginning to idle. I could not call my
[Araby] [810] wandering thoughts together. I had hardly any patience with the
[Araby] [814] On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to
[Araby] [818] "Yes, boy, I know."
[Araby] [820] As he was in the hall I could not go into the front parlour and lie at
[Araby] [821] the window. I left the house in bad humour and walked slowly
[Araby] [825] When I came home to dinner my uncle had not yet been home.
[Araby] [826] Still it was early. I sat staring at the clock for some time and. when
[Araby] [827] its ticking began to irritate me, I left the room. I mounted the
[Araby] [829] empty gloomy rooms liberated me and I went from room to room
[Araby] [830] singing. From the front window I saw my companions playing
[Araby] [832] indistinct and, leaning my forehead against the cool glass, I looked
[Araby] [833] over at the dark house where she lived. I may have stood there for
[Araby] [839] When I came downstairs again I found Mrs. Mercer sitting at the
[Araby] [841] collected used stamps for some pious purpose. I had to endure the
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [851] At nine o'clock I heard my uncle's latchkey in the halldoor. I heard
[Araby] [853] received the weight of his overcoat. I could interpret these signs.
[Araby] [854] When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me
[Araby] [859] I did not smile. My aunt said to him energetically:
[Araby] [866] dull boy." He asked me where I was going and, when I had told
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Araby] [868] his Steed. When I left the kitchen he was about to recite the
[Araby] [871] I held a florin tightly in my hand as I strode down Buckingham
[Araby] [874] journey. I took my seat in a third-class carriage of a deserted train.
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Araby] [881] improvised wooden platform. I passed out on to the road and saw
[Araby] [885] I could not find any sixpenny entrance and, fearing that the bazaar
[Araby] [886] would be closed, I passed in quickly through a turnstile, handing a
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[Araby] [889] closed and the greater part of the hall was in darkness. I recognised
[Araby] [890] a silence like that which pervades a church after a service. I
[Araby] [894] lamps, two men were counting money on a salver. I listened to the
[Araby] [897] Remembering with difficulty why I had come I went over to one of
[Araby] [900] two young gentlemen. I remarked their English accents and
[Araby] [903] "O, I never said such a thing!"
[Araby] [907] "O, but I didn't!"
[Araby] [911] "Yes. I heard her."
[Araby] [915] Observing me the young lady came over and asked me did I wish
[Araby] [917] seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty. I looked
[Araby] [928] I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless, to
[Araby] [929] make my interest in her wares seem the more real. Then I turned
[Araby] [930] away slowly and walked down the middle of the bazaar. I allowed
[Araby] [931] the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a
[Araby] [935] Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and
[Eveline] [1050] "I know these sailor chaps," he said.
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[Two Gallants] [1397] "That takes the solitary, unique, and, if I may so call it, recherche
[Two Gallants] [1417] "One night, man," he said, "I was going along Dame Street and I
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1422] man, I met her by appointment. We vent out to Donnybrook and I
[Two Gallants] [1427] fellow used to smoke.... I was afraid, man, she'd get in the family
[Two Gallants] [1432] "I told her I was out of a job," said Corley. "I told her I was in
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1438] "Of all the good ones ever I heard," he said, "that emphatically
[Two Gallants] [1470] "Well... tell me, Corley, I suppose you'll be able to pull it off all
[Two Gallants] [1478] "She's all right," said Corley. "I know the way to get around her,
[Two Gallants] [1481] "You're what I call a gay Lothario," said Lenehan. "And the proper
[Two Gallants] [1493] "First I used to go with girls, you know," said Corley, unbosoming;
[Two Gallants] [1494] "girls off the South Circular. I used to take them out, man, on the
[Two Gallants] [1497] way. I used to spend money on them right enough," he added, in a
[Two Gallants] [1502] "I know that game," he said, "and it's a mug's game."
[Two Gallants] [1504] "And damn the thing I ever got out of it," said Corley.
[Two Gallants] [1518] "She's on the turf now. I saw her driving down Earl Street one
[Two Gallants] [1521] "I suppose that's your doing," said Lenehan.
[Two Gallants] [1541] "Time enough," said Corley. "She'll be there all right. I always let
[Two Gallants] [1597] "Damn it!" said Lenehan boldly, "I don't want an introduction. All I
[The Boarding House] [1869] You know I am.
[The Boarding House] [1997] little vulgar; some times she said "I seen" and "If I had've known."
[The Boarding House] [2010] "O Bob! Bob! What am I to do? What am I to do at all?"
[The Boarding House] [2042] "What am I to do?" The instinct of the celibate warned him to hold
[A Little Cloud] [2258] good fellow.... Well, and how have you been pulling along since I
[A Little Cloud] [2274] have something new in your stuff. Damn proofs and printers, I say,
[A Little Cloud] [2275] for a few days. I'm deuced glad, I can tell you, to get back to the
[A Little Cloud] [2276] old country. Does a fellow good, a bit of a holiday. I feel a ton
[A Little Cloud] [2277] better since I landed again in dear dirty Dublin.... Here you are,
[A Little Cloud] [2283] Gallaher. "I drink mine neat."
[A Little Cloud] [2285] "I drink very little as a rule," said Little Chandler modestly. "An
[A Little Cloud] [2286] odd half-one or so when I meet any of the old crowd: that's all."
[A Little Cloud] [2293] "I met some of the old gang today," said Ignatius Gallaher. "O'Hara
[A Little Cloud] [2302] "I met him one night in London and he seemed to be very flush....
[A Little Cloud] [2303] Poor O'Hara! Boose, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2309] "Tommy," he said, "I see you haven't changed an atom. You're the
[A Little Cloud] [2311] mornings when I had a sore head and a fur on my tongue. You'd
[A Little Cloud] [2324] "I should think I have! I've knocked about there a little."
[A Little Cloud] [2359] they've a great feeling for the Irish there. When they heard I was
[A Little Cloud] [2372] You know what they are, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2382] insistence--"I mean, compared with London or Dublin?"
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2386] London when he was over there. He'd open your eye.... I say,
[A Little Cloud] [2392] same again, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2404] am I saying?--I've known them: cases of... immorality...."
[A Little Cloud] [2432] "Yes," he said. "I was married last May twelve months."
[A Little Cloud] [2434] "I hope it's not too late in the day to offer my best wishes," said
[A Little Cloud] [2435] Ignatius Gallaher. "I didn't know your address or I'd have done so
[A Little Cloud] [2440] "Well, Tommy," he said, "I wish you and yours every joy in life,
[A Little Cloud] [2441] old chap, and tons of money, and may you never die till I shoot
[A Little Cloud] [2445] "I know that," said Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2459] "Bravo," he said, "I wouldn't doubt you, Tommy."
[A Little Cloud] [2464] "I hope you'll spend an evening with us," he said, "before you go
[A Little Cloud] [2469] didn't meet earlier. But I must leave tomorrow night."
[A Little Cloud] [2480] I may take a little skip over here now that I've broken the ice. It's
[A Little Cloud] [2486] "Yes, that's agreed," said Ignatius Gallaher. "Next year if I come,
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2499] as a deoc an doruis--that's good vernacular for a small whisky, I
[A Little Cloud] [2526] come next year I may have the pleasure of wishing long life and
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2535] --if I ever do."
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2560] the woman and the cash. You don't believe it? Well, I know it.
[A Little Cloud] [2561] There are hundreds--what am I saying?--thousands of rich
[A Little Cloud] [2563] You wait a while my boy. See if I don't play my cards properly.
[A Little Cloud] [2564] When I go about a thing I mean business, I tell you. You just wait."
[A Little Cloud] [2570] "But I'm in no hurry. They can wait. I don't fancy tying myself up
[A Little Cloud] [2575] "Must get a bit stale, I should think," he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2642] Whilst I return to view my Margaret's tomb
[A Little Cloud] [2644] And scatter flowers on tbe dust I love.
[A Little Cloud] [2695] "It's nothing.... He ... he began to cry.... I couldn't ... I didn't do
[Counterparts] [2742] "Farrington? What is the meaning of this? Why have I always to
[Counterparts] [2743] complain of you? May I ask you why you haven't made a copy of
[Counterparts] [2744] that contract between Bodley and Kirwan? I told you it must be
[Counterparts] [2749] "Mr. Shelley said, sir .... Kindly attend to what I say and not to
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2781] "I was waiting to see..."
[Counterparts] [2837] "I know that game," he said. "Five times in one day is a little bit...
[Counterparts] [2899] "I know nothing about any other two letters," he said stupidly.
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2975] "So, I just looked at him--coolly, you know, and looked at her.
[Counterparts] [2976] Then I looked back at him again--taking my time, you know. 'I
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [3139] "Yes, pa. I --"
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3417] I dreamt that I dwelt in marble halls
[Clay] [3420] That I was the hope and the pride.
[Clay] [3422] I had riches too great to count; could boast
[Clay] [3424] But I also dreamt, which pleased me most,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3869] the Christian Brothers and I done what I could him, and there he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3870] goes boosing about. I tried to make him someway decent."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3875] stick to his back and beat him while I could stand over him--as I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3892] "Sure, amn't I never done at the drunken bowsy ever since he left
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3893] school? 'I won't keep you,' I says. 'You must get a job for yourself.'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3929] "Not yet," said Mr. O'Connor. "I hope to God he'll not leave us in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3936] "I hope he'll look smart about it if he means business," said Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3957] "I think you're right," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3982] not. I know him. Is it Tricky Dicky Tierney?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3985] I wish he'd turn up with the spondulics."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4022] "I did."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4026] "He wouldn't promise. He said: 'I won't tell anyone what way I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4027] going to vote.' But I think he'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4031] "He asked me who the nominators were; and I told him. I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4032] mentioned Father Burke's name. I think it'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4042] "It's no go," said Mr. Henchy, shaking his head. "I asked the little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4043] shoeboy, but he said: 'Oh, now, Mr. Henchy, when I see work
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4044] going on properly I won't forget you, you may be sure.' Mean little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4047] "What did I tell you, Mat?" said Mr. Hynes. "Tricky Dicky
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4052] pay up like a man instead of: 'O, now, Mr. Henchy, I must speak to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4054] hell! I suppose he forgets the time his little old father kept the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4071] "I can't help it," said Mr. Henchy. "I expect to find the bailiffs in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4072] the hall when I go home."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4107] greatly afraid our friend is not nineteen carat. Damn it, I can
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4108] understand a fellow being hard up, but what I can't understand is a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4116] "I don't know," said Mr. O'Connor dubiously, as he took out
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4123] opinion is about some of those little jokers? I believe half of them
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4128] "O, but I know it for a fact," said Mr. Henchy. "They're Castle
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4177] "O, don't trouble, I beg!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4181] "No, no, I can see.... Thank you, indeed."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4213] "No," said Mr. Henchy, "I think he's travelling on his own
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4214] account.... God forgive me," he added, "I thought he was the dozen
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4221] "I asked that little shoeboy three times," said Mr. Henchy, "would
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4222] he send up a dozen of stout. I asked him again now, but he was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4228] "Well, I couldn't go over while he was talking to Alderman
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4229] Cowley. I just waited till I caught his eye, and said: 'About that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4230] little matter I was speaking to you about....' 'That'll be all right, Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4235] thoughtfully. "I saw the three of them hard at it yesterday at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4238] "I think I know the little game they're at," said Mr. Henchy. "You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4242] you think? Would I do for the job?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4258] than some of them. I was talking one day to old Keegan, the porter.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4260] haven't much entertaining now,' says I. 'Entertaining!' says he. 'He'd
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4262] me? Now, I declare to God I didn't believe him."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4268] high living?' says he. 'Wisha! wisha,' says I. 'A pound of chops,'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4269] says he, 'coming into the Mansion House.' 'Wisha!' says I, 'what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4290] "I was told to ask for the bottles."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4344] "Well, I did a good day's work today," said Mr. Henchy, after a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4349] "Yes. I got him one or two sure things in Dawson Street, Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4353] while I do the talking."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4373] and I out in the cold and rain looking for votes?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4380] "How can I?" said the old man, "when there's no corkscrew? "
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4408] "I was just telling them, Crofton," said Mr. Henchy, that we got a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4413] "Well, I got Parkes for one, and I got Atkinson for two, and got
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4416] 'He's a respectable man,' said I. 'He's in favour of whatever will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4417] benefit this country. He's a big ratepayer,' I said. 'He has extensive
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4420] respected citizen,' said I, 'and a Poor Law Guardian, and he doesn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4438] "Parnell," said Mr. Henchy, "is dead. Now, here's the way I look at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4452] "Let bygones be bygones," said Mr. Henchy. "I admire the man
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4463] "What I mean," said Mr. Lyons, "is we have our ideals. Why, now,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4486] "Open another bottle of stout, Jack," said Mr. Henchy. "O, I forgot
[A Mother] [4719] "Well now, ladies and gentlemen. I suppose we'd better open the
[A Mother] [4863] "I wonder where did they dig her up," said Kathleen to Miss Healy.
[A Mother] [4864] "I'm sure I never heard of her."
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4900] "I don't know anything about Mr. Fitzpatrick," repeated Mrs.
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [4933] "I don't mind," said Mr. Hendrick.
[A Mother] [5027] "I agree with Miss Beirne," said Mr. O'Madden Burke. "Pay her
[A Mother] [5056] "I haven't seen any committee," said Mrs. Kearney angrily. "My
[A Mother] [5060] "I'm surprised at you, Mrs. Kearney," said Mr. Holohan. "I never
[A Mother] [5072] "Might I, indeed?... And when I ask when my daughter is going to
[A Mother] [5073] be paid I can't get a civil answer."
[A Mother] [5078] fellow fol-the-diddle-I-do."
[A Mother] [5080] "I thought you were a lady," said Mr. Holohan, walking away from
[Grace] [5238] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir. I hope we'll 'eet again. 'y na'e is
[Grace] [5319] "O, you needn't tell me that, Mr. Power. I know you're a friend of
[Grace] [5426] "I leave it all in your hands, Mr. Cunningham."
[Grace] [5466] "Pain? Not much," answered Mr. Kernan. "But it's so sickening. I
[Grace] [5467] feel as if I wanted to retch off."
[Grace] [5471] "No," said Mr. Kernan. "I think I caught cold on the car. There's
[Grace] [5490] "Those other two fellows I was with----"
[Grace] [5494] "A chap. I don't know his name. Damn it now, what's his name?
[Grace] [5521] "I wonder where did he go to," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5539] "Yes, yes," said Mr. Kernan, trying to remember. "I remember now
[Grace] [5548] "I suppose you squared the constable, Jack," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5597] people. I needn't tell you, Martin, what kind of men they are."
[Grace] [5604] "O yes, you get some good ones, I admit," said Mr. Kernan,
[Grace] [5672] "Yes, that's it," said Mr. Cunningham, "Jack and I and M'Coy here
[Grace] [5679] scoundrels, one and all. I say, one and all," he added with gruff
[Grace] [5682] "I own up," said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5684] "And I own up," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5703] "I haven't such a bad opinion of the Jesuits," he said, intervening at
[Grace] [5704] length. "They're an educated order. I believe they mean well, too."
[Grace] [5732] "Yes," said Mr. Kernan. "That's why I have a feeling for them. It's
[Grace] [5745] "Of course I'm right," said Mr. Cunningham. "I haven't been in the
[Grace] [5764] "Ah,... yes. I think I know him. Rather red face; tall."
[Grace] [5780] "Did I ever hear him!" said the invalid, nettled. "Rather! I heard
[Grace] [5793] "I heard him once," Mr. Kernan continued. "I forget the subject of
[Grace] [5794] his discourse now. Crofton and I were in the back of the... pit, you
[Grace] [5799] "Yes, in the back near the door. I forget now what.... O yes, it was
[Grace] [5800] on the Pope, the late Pope. I remember it well. Upon my word it
[Grace] [5802] hadn't he a voice! The Prisoner of the Vatican, he called him. I
[Grace] [5809] genuinely moved, tell you the God's truth--and I remember well
[Grace] [5859] "I wouldn't doubt you, old man. Open that, Jack, will you?"
[Grace] [5870] "I often heard he was one of the most intellectual men in Europe,"
[Grace] [5871] said Mr. Power. "I mean, apart from his being Pope."
[Grace] [5876] "No, no," said Mr. Fogarty eagerly. "I think you're wrong there. It
[Grace] [5877] was Lux in Tenebris, I think--Light in Darkness."
[Grace] [5899] "That's no joke, I can tell you."
[Grace] [5915] "I remember reading," said Mr. Cunningham, "that one of Pope
[Grace] [5955] "O, I know about the infallibility of the Pope. I remember I was
[Grace] [5991] "Are you sure of that now?" asked Mr. Fogarty dubiously. "I
[Grace] [6006] "I believe!" said Mr. Fogarty.
[Grace] [6022] "I once saw John MacHale," said Mr. Kernan, "and I'll never forget
[Grace] [6023] it as long as I live."
[Grace] [6027] "I often told you that?"
[Grace] [6039] "God!" he exclaimed, resuming his natural face, "I never saw such
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6056] "I don't mind," said Mr. Kernan, smiling a little nervously.
[Grace] [6061] "I pity the poor priest that has to listen to your tale."
[Grace] [6085] "What?" said Mr. Kernan. "Must I have a candle?"
[Grace] [6089] "No, damn it all," said Mr. Kernan sensibly, "I draw the line there.
[Grace] [6092] all, I bar the candles!"
[Grace] [6098] "I bar the candles," said Mr. Kernan, conscious of having created
[Grace] [6100] fro. "I bar the magic-lantern business."
[Grace] [6205] "Well, I have verified my accounts. I find all well."
[Grace] [6210] "Well, I have looked into my accounts. I find this wrong and this
[Grace] [6211] wrong. But, with God's grace, I will rectify this and this. I will set
[The Dead] [6283] "Here I am as right as the mail, Aunt Kate! Go on up. I'll follow,"
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6315] "O, then," said Gabriel gaily, "I suppose we'll be going to your
[The Dead] [6346] "O no, sir!" cried the girl, following him. "Really, sir, I wouldn't
[The Dead] [6422] underfoot I must put on my galoshes. Tonight even, he wanted me
[The Dead] [6423] to put them on, but I wouldn't. The next thing he'll buy me will be
[The Dead] [6462] girl like that, one you can depend on! There's that Lily, I'm sure I
[The Dead] [6470] "Now, I ask you," she said almost testily, "where is Julia going?
[The Dead] [6492] here. I always feel easier in my mind when he's here.... Julia,
[The Dead] [6541] to have said: 'Now, Mary Grimes, if I don't take it, make me take it,
[The Dead] [6542] for I feel I want it.'"
[The Dead] [6562] Kerrigan, will you take Miss Power? Miss Furlong, may I get you a
[The Dead] [6573] "I don't mind in the least, Miss Morkan."
[The Dead] [6704] "I have a crow to pluck with you."
[The Dead] [6717] "O, innocent Amy! I have found out that you write for The Daily
[The Dead] [6720] "Why should I be ashamed of myself?" asked Gabriel, blinking his
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6747] "Of course, I was only joking. Come, we cross now."
[The Dead] [6767] "The fact is," said Gabriel, "I have just arranged to go----"
[The Dead] [6771] "Well, you know, every year I go for a cycling tour with some
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6862] full of conceit, I think."
[The Dead] [6865] go for a trip to the west of Ireland and I said I wouldn't."
[The Dead] [6914] I think it had certain qualities of hospitality, of humour, of
[The Dead] [6946] "I was just telling my mother," he said, "I never heard you sing so
[The Dead] [6947] well, never. No, I never heard your voice so good as it is tonight.
[The Dead] [6949] word and honour that's the truth. I never heard your voice sound so
[The Dead] [6964] discovery. All I can say is I never heard her sing half so well as
[The Dead] [6965] long as I am coming here. And that's the honest truth."
[The Dead] [6967] "Neither did I," said Mr. Browne. "I think her voice has greatly
[The Dead] [6972] "Thirty years ago I hadn't a bad voice as voices go."
[The Dead] [6974] "I often told Julia," said Aunt Kate emphatically, "that she was
[The Dead] [6991] "I know all about the honour of God, Mary Jane, but I think it's not
[The Dead] [6994] whipper-snappers of boys over their heads. I suppose it is for the
[The Dead] [7009] "O, I don't question the pope's being right. I'm only a stupid old
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7011] a thing as common everyday politeness and gratitude. And if I
[The Dead] [7035] "I really couldn't," said Miss Ivors.
[The Dead] [7037] "I am afraid you didn't enjoy yourself at all," said Mary Jane
[The Dead] [7040] "Ever so much, I assure you," said Miss Ivors, "but you really must
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7076] "Here I am, Aunt Kate!" cried Gabriel, with sudden animation,
[The Dead] [7107] "Miss Furlong, what shall I send you?" he asked. "A wing or a slice
[The Dead] [7168] your opinion of him. I think he has a grand voice."
[The Dead] [7194] "Oh, well," said Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, "I presume there are as good
[The Dead] [7199] "In London, Paris, Milan," said Mr. Bartell D'Arcy warmly. "I
[The Dead] [7203] "Maybe so," said Mr. Browne. "But I may tell you I doubt it
[The Dead] [7209] was only one tenor. To please me, I mean. But I suppose none of
[The Dead] [7214] "His name," said Aunt Kate, "was Parkinson. I heard him when he
[The Dead] [7215] was in his prime and I think he had then the purest tenor voice that
[The Dead] [7218] "Strange," said Mr. Bartell D'Arcy. "I never even heard of him."
[The Dead] [7220] "Yes, yes, Miss Morkan is right," said Mr. Browne. "I remember
[The Dead] [7235] "Well, I hope, Miss Morkan," said Mr. Browne, "that I'm brown
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7274] "I like that idea very much but wouldn't a comfortable spring bed
[The Dead] [7315] very pleasing task but a task for which I am afraid my poor powers
[The Dead] [7320] "But, however that may be, I can only ask you tonight to take the
[The Dead] [7322] while I endeavour to express to you in words what my feelings are
[The Dead] [7328] perhaps, I had better say, the victims--of the hospitality of certain
[The Dead] [7335] "I feel more strongly with every recurring year that our country has
[The Dead] [7338] unique as far as my experience goes (and I have visited not a few
[The Dead] [7342] failing, and one that I trust will long be cultivated among us. Of
[The Dead] [7343] one thing, at least, I am sure. As long as this one roof shelters the
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7359] misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in
[The Dead] [7360] a sceptical and, if I may use the phrase, a thought-tormented age:
[The Dead] [7361] and sometimes I fear that this new generation, educated or
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7385] "Therefore, I will not linger on the past. I will not let any gloomy
[The Dead] [7390] spirit of camaraderie, and as the guests of--what shall I call them?
[The Dead] [7404] "I will not attempt to play tonight the part that Paris played on
[The Dead] [7405] another occasion. I will not attempt to choose between them. The
[The Dead] [7407] For when I view them in turn, whether it be our chief hostess
[The Dead] [7412] when I consider our youngest hostess, talented, cheerful,
[The Dead] [7413] hard-working and the best of nieces, I confess, Ladies and
[The Dead] [7414] Gentlemen, that I do not know to which of them I should award the
[The Dead] [7481] "But tell him to come in, Mary Jane, and close the door. I hope to
[The Dead] [7513] like that. I wouldn't like to face your journey home at this hour."
[The Dead] [7545] "Amen," said Gabriel. "So the old gentleman, as I said, harnessed
[The Dead] [7548] somewhere near Back Lane, I think."
[The Dead] [7577] "I could only get one cab," he said.
[The Dead] [7679] "I have been at him all the evening," said Miss O'Callaghan, "and
[The Dead] [7699] years; and I read this morning in the newspapers that the snow is
[The Dead] [7702] "I love the look of snow," said Aunt Julia sadly.
[The Dead] [7704] "So do I," said Miss O'Callaghan. "I think Christmas is never really
[The Dead] [7725] "It's called The Lass of Aughrim," said Mr. D'Arcy, "but I couldn't
[The Dead] [7728] "The Lass of Aughrim," she repeated. "I couldn't think of the
[The Dead] [7734] "Now, Mary Jane," said Aunt Kate, "don't annoy Mr. D'Arcy. I
[The Dead] [7748] "O, good-night, Gretta, I didn't see you."
[The Dead] [7834] "I see a white man this time," said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7888] And I say," he added, pointing to the candle, "you might remove
[The Dead] [7913] "I am a little," she answered.
[The Dead] [7932] Gabriel in a false voice. "He gave me back that sovereign I lent
[The Dead] [7933] him, and I didn't expect it, really. It's a pity he wouldn't keep away
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [7985] "O, I am thinking about that song, The Lass of Aughrim."
[The Dead] [8004] "I am thinking about a person long ago who used to sing that
[The Dead] [8009] "It was a person I used to know in Galway when I was living with
[The Dead] [8018] "It was a young boy I used to know," she answered, "named
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8031] "I used to go out walking with him," she said, "when I was in
[The Dead] [8046] "How do I know? To see him, perhaps."
[The Dead] [8073] "I suppose you were in love with this Michael Furey, Gretta," he
[The Dead] [8076] "I was great with him at that time," she said.
[The Dead] [8084] "I think he died for me," she answered.
[The Dead] [8097] when I was going to leave my grandmother's and come up here to
[The Dead] [8100] to. He was in decline, they said, or something like that. I never
[The Dead] [8114] come up to the convent he was much worse and I wouldn't be let
[The Dead] [8115] see him so I wrote him a letter saying I was going up to Dublin and
[The Dead] [8122] "Then the night before I left, I was in my grandmother's house in
[The Dead] [8123] Nuns' Island, packing up, and I heard gravel thrown up against the
[The Dead] [8124] window. The window was so wet I couldn't see, so I ran downstairs
[The Dead] [8125] as I was and slipped out the back into the garden and there was the
[The Dead] [8130] "I implored of him to go home at once and told him he would get
[The Dead] [8131] his death in the rain. But he said he did not want to live. I can see
[The Dead] [8137] "Yes, he went home. And when I was only a week in the convent
[The Dead] [8139] from. O, the day I heard that, that he was dead!"