Dubliners by James Joyce
Is

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 177 occurrences of the word:   is

[The Sisters] [37] "Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear."
[The Sisters] [43] "Is he dead?"
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [73] now. Education is all very fine and large.... Mr. Cotter might take a
[The Sisters] [279] "Ah, there's no friends like the old friends," she said, "when all is
[An Encounter] [411] "What is this rubbish?" he said. "The Apache Chief! Is this what
[An Encounter] [578] pointing to Mahony who was regarding us with open eyes, "he is
[Araby] [862] late enough as it is."
[Eveline] [976] "He is in Melbourne now."
[After the Race] [1313] "It is delightful!"
[Two Gallants] [1475] "Is she game for that?" asked Lenehan dubiously. "You can never
[Two Gallants] [1566] she is."
[Two Gallants] [1584] "There she is!" said Corley.
[Two Gallants] [1598] want is to have a look at her. I'm not going to eat her."
[Two Gallants] [1690] "How much is a plate of peas?" he asked.
[The Boarding House] [1859] always sure to be on to a good thing-that is to say, a likely horse or
[The Boarding House] [1881] feel that there is a young woman not very far away. Polly, of
[The Boarding House] [1942] There must be reparation made in such case. It is all very well for
[The Boarding House] [1980] hear of it. Dublin is such a small city: everyone knows everyone
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2326] "And is it really so beautiful as they say?" asked Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2333] it is beautiful.... But it's the life of Paris; that's the thing. Ah, there's
[A Little Cloud] [2356] "Everything in Paris is gay," said Ignatius Gallaher. "They believe
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2369] "Every place is immoral," he said. "Of course you do find spicy
[A Little Cloud] [2381] "Then it is an immoral city," said Little Chandler, with timid
[A Little Cloud] [2391] "O, come on, another one won't do you any harm. What is it? The
[A Little Cloud] [2419] Dublin where nothing is known of such things."
[A Little Cloud] [2474] fellow, clever young chap he is too, and we arranged to go to a
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2680] "What is it? What is it?" she cried.
[Counterparts] [2742] "Farrington? What is the meaning of this? Why have I always to
[Counterparts] [2751] another for shirking work. Let me tell you that if the contract is not
[Counterparts] [2837] "I know that game," he said. "Five times in one day is a little bit...
[Counterparts] [3125] "Who is that?" said the man, peering through the darkness.
[Clay] [3225] "Mamma is mamma but Maria is my proper mother."
[A Painful Case] [3442] the shallow river on which Dublin is built. The lofty walls of his
[A Painful Case] [3508] "What a pity there is such a poor house tonight! It's so hard on
[A Painful Case] [3597] to break off their intercourse: every bond, he said, is a bond to
[A Painful Case] [3611] between man and man is impossible because there must not be
[A Painful Case] [3612] sexual intercourse and friendship between man and woman is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3886] "What age is he?" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3900] "Hello! Is this a Freemason's meeting?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3906] "Is that you, Hynes?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3967] halfpence. But it's labour produces everything. The workingman is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3969] working-man is not going to drag the honour of Dublin in the mud
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3982] not. I know him. Is it Tricky Dicky Tierney?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4057] "But is that a fact?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4103] "Ah, poor Joe is a decent skin," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4107] greatly afraid our friend is not nineteen carat. Damn it, I can
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4108] understand a fellow being hard up, but what I can't understand is a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4123] opinion is about some of those little jokers? I believe half of them
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4156] "O Father Keon!" said Mr. Henchy, jumping up from his chair. "Is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4179] "No, but the stairs is so dark."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4196] "What he is exactly?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4201] Kavanagh's together. Is he a priest at all?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4211] "Is he attached to any chapel or church or institution or---"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4217] "Is there any chance of a drink itself?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4270] kind of people is going at all now?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4275] "What is it?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4372] "Is that the way you chaps canvass," said Mr. Lyons, "and Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4391] "Which is my bottle?" he asked.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4414] Ward of Dawson Street. Fine old chap he is, too--regular old toff,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4431] idle! Look at all the money there is in the country if we only
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4438] "Parnell," said Mr. Henchy, "is dead. Now, here's the way I look at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4450] Edward's life, you know, is not the very..."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4463] "What I mean," said Mr. Lyons, "is we have our ideals. Why, now,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4468] "This is Parnell's anniversary," said Mr. O'Connor, "and don't let us
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4516] "O, that thing is it.... Sure, that's old now."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4535] He is dead. Our Uncrowned King is dead.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4545] Is bowed with woe--for he is gone
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4689] when a little expense is justifiable. She took a dozen of
[A Mother] [4777] "And who is the Cometty pray?"
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4995] "This is four shillings short."
[A Mother] [5072] "Might I, indeed?... And when I ask when my daughter is going to
[Grace] [5164] "Who is the man? What's his name and address?"
[Grace] [5238] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir. I hope we'll 'eet again. 'y na'e is
[Grace] [5258] "I'an't 'an," he answered, "'y 'ongue is hurt."
[Grace] [5563] "Is this what we pay rates for?" he asked. "To feed and clothe these
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5644] "But we mustn't be late," said Mr. Power earnestly, "because it is
[Grace] [5661] "The opera, is it?" said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5721] "Is that so?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5736] way. The Irish priesthood is honoured all the world over."
[Grace] [5755] Purdon is giving it. It's for business men, you know."
[Grace] [5768] "And tell me, Martin.... Is he a good preacher?"
[Grace] [5786] "Is that so?" said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5807] "'Course he is," said Mr. Kernan, "and a damned decent
[Grace] [5811] said, but our belief is the same. Struck me as very well put."
[Grace] [5827] "our religion is the religion, the old, original faith."
[Grace] [5835] "Who is it?"
[Grace] [5883] that is, Cross upon Cross--to show the difference between their
[Grace] [5894] "Is that so?" said Mr. Fogarty.
[Grace] [5944] is this. Not one of them, not the biggest drunkard, not the most...
[Grace] [5948] "That is," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5951] explained, "he is infallible."
[Grace] [5989] "What?" cried Mr. Kernan. "Is it John of Tuam?"
[Grace] [6079] "All we have to do," said Mr. Cunningham, "is to stand up with
[The Dead] [6294] "Is it snowing again, Mr. Conroy?" asked Lily.
[The Dead] [6321] "The men that is now is only all palaver and what they can get out
[The Dead] [6452] "0, the room is all right," replied Gabriel. "I've taken one in the
[The Dead] [6461] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate again. "What a comfort it is to have a
[The Dead] [6470] "Now, I ask you," she said almost testily, "where is Julia going?
[The Dead] [6485] is."
[The Dead] [6491] "It's such a relief," said Aunt Kate to Mrs. Conroy, "that Gabriel is
[The Dead] [6507] Miss Morkan, the reason they are so fond of me is----"
[The Dead] [6540] "Well, you see, I'm like the famous Mrs. Cassidy, who is reported
[The Dead] [6576] get him to sing later on. All Dublin is raving about him."
[The Dead] [6585] "What is the matter, Julia?" asked Aunt Kate anxiously. "Who is
[The Dead] [6613] "He's not so bad, is he?" said Aunt Kate to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6710] "What is it?" asked Gabriel, smiling at her solemn manner.
[The Dead] [6712] "Who is G. C.?" answered Miss Ivors, turning her eyes upon him.
[The Dead] [6757] splendid out in the Atlantic. You ought to come. Mr. Clancy is
[The Dead] [6767] "The fact is," said Gabriel, "I have just arranged to go----"
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6851] "She's sending in the younger ones first as soon as this waltz is
[The Dead] [6904] feels that one is listening to a thought- tormented music." Miss
[The Dead] [6912] and Aunt Julia: "Ladies and Gentlemen, the generation which is
[The Dead] [6916] generation that is growing up around us seems to me to lack." Very
[The Dead] [6947] well, never. No, I never heard your voice so good as it is tonight.
[The Dead] [6964] discovery. All I can say is I never heard her sing half so well as
[The Dead] [6994] whipper-snappers of boys over their heads. I suppose it is for the
[The Dead] [7003] "Now, Aunt Kate, you're giving scandal to Mr. Browne who is of
[The Dead] [7072] "Where is Gabriel?" she cried. "Where on earth is Gabriel? There's
[The Dead] [7174] sharply. "Is it because he's only a black?"
[The Dead] [7200] suppose Caruso, for example, is quite as good, if not better than
[The Dead] [7220] "Yes, yes, Miss Morkan is right," said Mr. Browne. "I remember
[The Dead] [7277] "The coffin," said Mary Jane, "is to remind them of their last end."
[The Dead] [7325] "Ladies and Gentlemen, it is not the first time that we have
[The Dead] [7327] board. It is not the first time that we have been the recipients--or
[The Dead] [7337] guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is
[The Dead] [7340] perhaps, that with us it is rather a failing than anything to be
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7348] our descendants, is still alive among us."
[The Dead] [7356] "A new generation is growing up in our midst, a generation
[The Dead] [7357] actuated by new ideas and new principles. It is serious and
[The Dead] [7358] enthusiastic for these new ideas and its enthusiasm, even when it is
[The Dead] [7359] misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in
[The Dead] [7362] hypereducated as it is, will lack those qualities of humanity, of
[The Dead] [7379] path through life is strewn with many such sad memories: and
[The Dead] [7467] "Browne is out there, Aunt Kate," said Mary Jane.
[The Dead] [7469] "Browne is everywhere," said Aunt Kate, lowering her voice.
[The Dead] [7473] "Really," she said archly, "he is very attentive."
[The Dead] [7507] "Someone is fooling at the piano anyhow," said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7528] "The late lamented Patrick Morkan, our grandfather, that is,"
[The Dead] [7635] He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the
[The Dead] [7670] "O, what a pity!" she cried. "Is he coming down, Gretta?"
[The Dead] [7699] years; and I read this morning in the newspapers that the snow is
[The Dead] [7704] "So do I," said Miss O'Callaghan. "I think Christmas is never really
[The Dead] [7722] "Mr. D'Arcy," she said, "what is the name of that song you were
[The Dead] [7791] "Is the fire hot, sir?"
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7806] dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be
[The Dead] [7925] "What is it?"
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [8051] "He is dead," she said at length. "He died when he was only