Dubliners by James Joyce
It

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 590 occurrences of the word:   It

[The Sisters] [3] THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.
[The Sisters] [4] Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and
[The Sisters] [6] found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was
[The Sisters] [12] myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my
[The Sisters] [14] the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some
[The Sisters] [15] maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed
[The Sisters] [16] to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.
[The Sisters] [31] "I have my own theory about it," he said. "I think it was one of
[The Sisters] [78] My aunt brought the dish from the safe and put it on the table.
[The Sisters] [84] impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it
[The Sisters] [90] It was late when I fell asleep. Though I was angry with old Cotter
[The Sisters] [95] face still followed me. It murmured, and I understood that it
[The Sisters] [97] pleasant and vicious region; and there again I found it waiting for
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [99] wondered why it smiled continually and why the lips were so
[The Sisters] [100] moist with spittle. But then I remembered that it had died of
[The Sisters] [105] house in Great Britain Street. It was an unassuming shop,
[The Sisters] [125] stupefied doze. It was always I who emptied the packet into his
[The Sisters] [129] dribbled through his fingers over the front of his coat. It may have
[The Sisters] [132] blackened, as it always was, with the snuff-stains of a week, with
[The Sisters] [139] went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a
[The Sisters] [179] mourning. It was after sunset; but the window-panes of the houses
[The Sisters] [181] clouds. Nannie received us in the hall; and, as it would have been
[The Sisters] [253] "Well, Miss Flynn, at any rate it must be a great comfort for you to
[The Sisters] [261] in it."
[The Sisters] [270] know what we'd done at all. It was him brought us all them flowers
[The Sisters] [318] Eliza took out her handkerchief and wiped her eyes with it. Then
[The Sisters] [319] she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate
[The Sisters] [329] A silence took possession of the little room and, under cover of it,
[The Sisters] [335] "It was that chalice he broke.... That was the beginning of it. Of
[The Sisters] [336] course, they say it was all right, that it contained nothing, I mean.
[The Sisters] [337] But still.... They say it was the boy's fault. But poor James was so
[The Sisters] [340] "And was that it?" said my aunt. "I heard something...."
[An Encounter] [368] IT WAS Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us. He had a
[An Encounter] [373] carry it by storm; or we fought a pitched battle on the grass. But,
[An Encounter] [385] Everyone was incredulous when it was reported that he had a
[An Encounter] [386] vocation for the priesthood. Nevertheless it was true.
[An Encounter] [405] you studied it? What have you there in your pocket?"
[An Encounter] [414] it, I suppose, was some wretched fellow who writes these things
[An Encounter] [416] stuff. I could understand it if you were ... National School boys.
[An Encounter] [452] hurried along the canal bank. It was a mild sunny morning in the
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [466] explained some improvements which he had made in it. I asked
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [473] "Come along. I knew Fatty'd funk it."
[An Encounter] [490] Smoothing Iron we arranged a siege; but it was a failure because
[An Encounter] [498] immobility by the drivers of groaning carts. It was noon when we
[An Encounter] [505] being discharged on the opposite quay. Mahony said it would be
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [540] It was too late and we were too tired to carry out our project of
[An Encounter] [566] with great care. He began to talk of the weather, saying that it
[An Encounter] [651] boys to be whipped, as he called it; but I remained silent. He began
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[Araby] [718] ever-changing violet and towards it the lamps of the street lifted
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [780] me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It
[Araby] [792] railing. It fell over one side of her dress and caught the white
[Araby] [807] it was not some Freemason affair. I answered few questions in
[Araby] [811] serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my
[Araby] [826] Still it was early. I sat staring at the clock for some time and. when
[Araby] [844] was sorry she couldn't wait any longer, but it was after eight
[Araby] [852] him talking to himself and heard the hallstand rocking when it had
[Araby] [862] late enough as it is."
[Araby] [876] slowly. It crept onward among ruinous house and over the
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Araby] [882] by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten. In front
[Eveline] [949] a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it--not
[Eveline] [973] showed the photograph to a visitor her father used to pass it with a
[Eveline] [994] But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not
[Eveline] [999] it was that that had given her the palpitations. When they were
[Eveline] [1020] and got their meals regularly. It was hard work--a hard life--but
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1029] main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He
[Eveline] [1038] used to call her Poppens out of fun. First of all it had been an
[Eveline] [1069] organ playing. She knew the air Strange that it should come that
[Eveline] [1118] No! No! No! It was impossible. Her hands clutched the iron in
[After the Race] [1142] blue car, therefore, received a double measure of welcome as it
[After the Race] [1176] excess, had paid his bills and brought him home. It was at
[After the Race] [1202] driver had disclosed a line of shining white teeth. It was pleasant
[After the Race] [1205] great sum under his control. Segouin, perhaps, would not think it a
[After the Race] [1208] it had been got together. This knowledge had previously kept his
[After the Race] [1213] his substance! It was a serious thing for him.
[After the Race] [1216] managed to give the impression that it was by a favour of
[After the Race] [1219] business matters and in this case it had been his father who had
[After the Race] [1223] car in which he sat. How smoothly it ran. In what style they had
[After the Race] [1298] as it seemed to Jimmy, they were walking out of Kingstown
[After the Race] [1303] It was a serene summer night; the harbour lay like a darkened
[After the Race] [1304] mirror at their feet. They proceeded towards it with linked arms,
[After the Race] [1313] "It is delightful!"
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[After the Race] [1321] for form's sake. They drank, however: it was Bohemian. They
[After the Race] [1325] clapping of hands when he sat down. It must have been a good
[After the Race] [1336] losing. But it was his own fault for he frequently mistook his cards
[After the Race] [1338] devils of fellows but he wished they would stop: it was getting late.
[After the Race] [1342] The piano had stopped; Villona must have gone up on deck. It was
[After the Race] [1343] a terrible game. They stopped just before the end of it to drink for
[Two Gallants] [1386] face, when the waves of expression had passed over it, had a
[Two Gallants] [1397] "That takes the solitary, unique, and, if I may so call it, recherche
[Two Gallants] [1424] dairyman.... It was fine, man. Cigarettes every night she'd bring me
[Two Gallants] [1447] and oily; it sweated in all weathers; and his large round hat, set
[Two Gallants] [1448] upon it sideways, looked like a bulb which had grown out of
[Two Gallants] [1450] parade and, when he wished to gaze after someone in the street, it
[Two Gallants] [1470] "Well... tell me, Corley, I suppose you'll be able to pull it off all
[Two Gallants] [1489] tip for it."
[Two Gallants] [1500] But Lenehan could well believe it; he nodded gravely.
[Two Gallants] [1504] "And damn the thing I ever got out of it," said Corley.
[Two Gallants] [1510] He moistened his upper lip by running his tongue along it. The
[Two Gallants] [1550] "But tell me," said Lenehan again, "are you sure you can bring it
[Two Gallants] [1558] "I'll pull it off," he said. "Leave it to me, can't you?"
[Two Gallants] [1597] "Damn it!" said Lenehan boldly, "I don't want an introduction. All I
[Two Gallants] [1616] "Work it all right now," said Lenehan in farewell.
[Two Gallants] [1679] blue dish while near it on a plate lay a segment of very light
[Two Gallants] [1703] ate his food greedily and found it so good that he made a note of
[Two Gallants] [1713] thought how pleasant it would be to have a warm fire to sit by and
[Two Gallants] [1735] Westmoreland Street asked was it true that Mac had won a bit over
[Two Gallants] [1744] of Surgeons: it was on the stroke of ten. He set off briskly along
[Two Gallants] [1748] cigarettes which he had reserved and lit it. He leaned against the
[Two Gallants] [1753] it successfully. He wondered if he had asked her yet or if he would
[Two Gallants] [1754] leave it to the last. He suffered all the pangs and thrills of his
[Two Gallants] [1757] Corley would pull it off all right. All at once the idea struck him
[Two Gallants] [1760] them. Yet it was surely half-an-hour since he had seen the clock of
[Two Gallants] [1762] his last cigarette and began to smoke it nervously. He strained his
[Two Gallants] [1765] broke and he flung it into the road with a curse.
[Two Gallants] [1773] would fail; he knew it was no go.
[Two Gallants] [1804] "Well?" he said. "Did it come off?"
[Two Gallants] [1816] smiling, opened it slowly to the gaze of his disciple. A small gold
[The Boarding House] [1826] headlong into debt. It was no use making him take the pledge: he
[The Boarding House] [1896] perturbed. At last, when she judged it to be the right moment, Mrs.
[The Boarding House] [1900] It was a bright Sunday morning of early summer, promising heat,
[The Boarding House] [1922] her awkward but also because she did not wish it to be thought that
[The Boarding House] [1928] that the bells of George's Church had stopped ringing. It was
[The Boarding House] [1942] There must be reparation made in such case. It is all very well for
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1953] like the others. If it had been Mr. Sheridan or Mr. Meade or
[The Boarding House] [1978] but marry her or run away? He could not brazen it out. The affair
[The Boarding House] [1980] hear of it. Dublin is such a small city: everyone knows everyone
[The Boarding House] [1992] money enough to settle down on; it was not that. But the family
[The Boarding House] [2000] she had done. Of course he had done it too. His instinct urged him
[The Boarding House] [2002] for, it said.
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2014] He comforted her feebly, telling her not to cry, that it would be all
[The Boarding House] [2018] It was not altogether his fault that it had happened. He
[The Boarding House] [2023] had been blown out by a gust. It was her bath night. She wore a
[The Boarding House] [2029] On nights when he came in very late it was she who warmed up his
[The Boarding House] [2041] But delirium passes. He echoed her phrase, applying it to himself:
[The Boarding House] [2049] ever. When he was dressed he went over to her to comfort her. It
[A Little Cloud] [2110] place and he had deserved to win. It was something to have a
[A Little Cloud] [2129] covered the grass plots and walks. It cast a shower of kindly
[A Little Cloud] [2131] drowsed on the benches; it flickered upon all the moving figures--
[A Little Cloud] [2136] He felt how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being
[A Little Cloud] [2168] always passed without turning his head to look. It was his habit to
[A Little Cloud] [2179] the London Press! Who would have thought it possible eight years
[A Little Cloud] [2196] That was Ignatius Gallaher all out; and, damn it, you couldn't but
[A Little Cloud] [2197] admire him for it.
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2210] poem to express his idea. Perhaps Gallaher might be able to get it
[A Little Cloud] [2221] verse. He felt them within him. He tried weigh his soul to see if it
[A Little Cloud] [2223] temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by
[A Little Cloud] [2225] give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen.
[A Little Cloud] [2233] pervades these poems." ... "The Celtic note." It was a pity his name
[A Little Cloud] [2234] was not more Irish-looking. Perhaps it would be better to insert his
[A Little Cloud] [2237] it.
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2272] "It pulls you down," be said, "Press life. Always hurry and scurry,
[A Little Cloud] [2273] looking for copy and sometimes not finding it: and then, always to
[A Little Cloud] [2326] "And is it really so beautiful as they say?" asked Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2333] it is beautiful.... But it's the life of Paris; that's the thing. Ah, there's
[A Little Cloud] [2350] observed before. But perhaps it was only the result of living in
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2381] "Then it is an immoral city," said Little Chandler, with timid
[A Little Cloud] [2391] "O, come on, another one won't do you any harm. What is it? The
[A Little Cloud] [2421] "How dull you must find it," said Little Chandler, "after all the
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2426] You can't help having a certain feeling for it. That's human
[A Little Cloud] [2428] had... tasted the joys of connubial bliss. Two years ago, wasn't it?"
[A Little Cloud] [2484] must have an evening together. That's agreed now, isn't it?"
[A Little Cloud] [2492] Ignatius Gallaher took out a large gold watch and looked a it.
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2512] life and his friend's and it seemed to him unjust. Gallaher was his
[A Little Cloud] [2516] chance. What was it that stood in his way? His unfortunate timidity
[A Little Cloud] [2552] "If ever it occurs, you may bet your bottom dollar there'll be no
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2560] the woman and the cash. You don't believe it? Well, I know it.
[A Little Cloud] [2580] the evening to help. But Monica had gone home long ago. It was a
[A Little Cloud] [2585] when it came near the time at which the shop at the corner closed
[A Little Cloud] [2594] crumpled horn. It was Annie's photograph. Little Chandler looked
[A Little Cloud] [2595] at it, pausing at the thin tight lips. She wore the pale blue summer
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2598] nervousness it had cost him! How he had suffered that day, waiting
[A Little Cloud] [2604] parcel to see if it was securely tied. When he brought the blouse
[A Little Cloud] [2605] home Annie kissed him and said it was very pretty and stylish; but
[A Little Cloud] [2607] it was a regular swindle to charge ten and elevenpence for it. At
[A Little Cloud] [2608] first she wanted to take it back but when she tried it on she was
[A Little Cloud] [2609] delighted with it, especially with the make of the sleeves, and
[A Little Cloud] [2616] pretty. But he found something mean in it. Why was it so
[A Little Cloud] [2627] it herself and it reminded hi of her. It too was prim and pretty. A
[A Little Cloud] [2629] escape from his little house? Was it too late for him to try to live
[A Little Cloud] [2632] it published, that might open the way for him.
[A Little Cloud] [2635] it cautiously with his left hand lest he should waken the child and
[A Little Cloud] [2647] How melancholy it was! Could he, too, write like that, express the
[A Little Cloud] [2653] tried to hush it: but it would not be hushed. He began to rock it to
[A Little Cloud] [2654] and fro in his arms but its wailing cry grew keener. He rocked it
[A Little Cloud] [2661] It was useless. He couldn't read. He couldn't do anything. The
[A Little Cloud] [2662] wailing of the child pierced the drum of his ear. It was useless,
[A Little Cloud] [2670] down the room with the child in his arms. It began to sob
[A Little Cloud] [2673] He tried to soothe it but it sobbed more convulsively. He looked at
[A Little Cloud] [2676] caught the child to his breast in fright. If it died!...
[A Little Cloud] [2680] "What is it? What is it?" she cried.
[Counterparts] [2739] pink and hairless it seemed like a large egg reposing on the papers.
[Counterparts] [2744] that contract between Bodley and Kirwan? I told you it must be
[Counterparts] [2768] his throat for a few moments and then passed, leaving after it a
[Counterparts] [2791] which remained to be copied. He took up his pen and dipped it in
[Counterparts] [2805] man pulled a shepherd's plaid cap out of his pocket, put it on his
[Counterparts] [2815] The curate brought him a glass of plain porter. The man drank it at
[Counterparts] [2817] counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom,
[Counterparts] [2818] retreated out of the snug as furtively as he had entered it.
[Counterparts] [2846] spend it in the bars, drinking with his friends amid the glare of gas
[Counterparts] [2862] correspondence and then flicked it towards him as if to say: "That's
[Counterparts] [2867] the said Bernard Bodley be... and thought how strange it was that
[Counterparts] [2873] the glare and rattle of the public-house. It was a night for hot
[Counterparts] [2875] five he had still fourteen pages to write. Blast it! He couldn't finish
[Counterparts] [2876] it in time. He longed to execrate aloud, to bring his fist down on
[Counterparts] [2895] he had made a faithful copy. The tirade continued: it was so bitter
[Counterparts] [2907] and back again; and, almost before he was aware of it, his tongue
[Counterparts] [2917] fist in the man's face till it seemed to vibrate like the knob of some
[Counterparts] [2931] the cashier came out with the chief clerk. It was no use trying to
[Counterparts] [2945] had been the beginning of it. He might have tried Higgins for the
[Counterparts] [2954] soon it would be too late for getting money anywhere. Suddenly,
[Counterparts] [2957] of it sooner?
[Counterparts] [2961] going to have a good night of it. The clerk in Terry Kelly's said A
[Counterparts] [2981] saying it was as smart a thing as ever he heard. Farrington stood a
[Counterparts] [2987] the eclogues, he had to admit that it was not as clever as
[Counterparts] [2993] asked him to give his version of it, and he did so with great
[Counterparts] [3053] there was one thing that he hated it was a sponge. He was so angry
[Counterparts] [3062] it was agreed to have a trial of strength. The table was cleared and
[Counterparts] [3063] the two men rested their elbows on it, clasping hands. When Paddy
[Counterparts] [3072] "You're not to put the weight of your body behind it. Play fair," he
[Counterparts] [3089] "What the hell do you know about it?" said Farrington fiercely,
[Counterparts] [3151] "I'm going... to cook it, pa," said the little boy.
[Counterparts] [3159] standing behind it.
[Clay] [3202] wouldn't do to the dummy who had charge of the irons if it wasn't
[Clay] [3211] because Joe had brought it to her five years before when he and
[Clay] [3228] Dublin by Lamplight laundry, and she liked it. She used to have
[Clay] [3255] sup of porter to drink it in. And Maria laughed again till the tip of
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3287] was so full of people that it was a long time before she could get
[Clay] [3291] They would be sure to have plenty of apples and nuts. It was hard
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3297] annoyed by her, asked her was it wedding-cake she wanted to buy.
[Clay] [3299] lady took it all very seriously and finally cut a thick slice of
[Clay] [3300] plumcake, parcelled it up and said:
[Clay] [3313] said it was only right that the youngsters should enjoy themselves
[Clay] [3319] her tiny head under the rain, she thought how easy it was to know a
[Clay] [3326] cakes to the eldest boy, Alphy, to divide and Mrs. Donnelly said it
[Clay] [3336] could she find it. Then she asked all the children had any of them
[Clay] [3337] eaten it--by mistake, of course--but the children all said no and
[Clay] [3340] Mrs. Donnelly said it was plain that Maria had left it behind her in
[Clay] [3347] But Joe said it didn't matter and made her sit down by the fire. He
[Clay] [3357] nutcrackers and Joe was nearly getting cross over it and asked how
[Clay] [3369] she had mentioned the matter. Mrs. Donnelly told her husband it
[Clay] [3372] nearly being a row on the head of it. But Joe said he would not
[Clay] [3373] lose his temper on account of the night it was and asked his wife to
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3395] next-door girls and told her to throw it out at once: that was no
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3397] to do it over again: and this time she got the prayer-book.
[A Painful Case] [3516] had remained intelligent. It was an oval face with strongly marked
[A Painful Case] [3585] We cannot give ourselves, it said: we are our own. The end of
[A Painful Case] [3588] passionately and pressed it to her cheek.
[A Painful Case] [3594] confessional they meet in a little cakeshop near the Parkgate. It
[A Painful Case] [3629] properly cooked. He said it was very good and ate a few mouthfuls
[A Painful Case] [3630] of it with difficulty. Then he paid his bill and went out.
[A Painful Case] [3641] read it not aloud, but moving his lips as a priest does when he
[A Painful Case] [3661] afterwards brought it to rest in response to loud cries. The train
[A Painful Case] [3710] The Deputy Coroner said it was a most painful case, and expressed
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[A Painful Case] [3735] reared. But that she could have sunk so low! Was it possible he
[A Painful Case] [3737] outburst of that night and interpreted it in a harsher sense than he
[A Painful Case] [3744] quickly and went out. The cold air met him on the threshold; it
[A Painful Case] [3756] and he called for another punch. He sat a long time over it. The
[A Painful Case] [3773] It was after nine o'clock when he left the shop. The night was cold
[A Painful Case] [3796] through the darkness, obstinately and laboriously. It passed slowly
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3815] light. It was an old man's face, very bony and hairy. The moist blue
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3817] munching once or twice mechanically when it closed. When the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3842] He selected one of the cards and read what was printed on it:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3859] dark. It was the sixth of October, dismal and cold out of doors.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3861] Mr. O'Connor tore a strip off the card and, lighting it, lit his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3882] it, only impudence. He takes th'upper hand of me whenever he sees
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3894] But, sure, it's worse whenever he gets a job; he drinks it all."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3915] "Well, Mat," he said to Mr. O'Connor, "how goes it?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3936] "I hope he'll look smart about it if he means business," said Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3944] "It isn't but he has it, anyway. Not like the other tinker."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3982] not. I know him. Is it Tricky Dicky Tierney?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3988] together. Mr. Hynes took off his hat, shook it and then turned
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3998] some life in it then."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4071] "I can't help it," said Mr. Henchy. "I expect to find the bailiffs in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4107] greatly afraid our friend is not nineteen carat. Damn it, I can
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4128] "O, but I know it for a fact," said Mr. Henchy. "They're Castle
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4146] body and it was impossible to say whether he wore a clergyman's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4171] "No, no, thank you. It was just a little business matter," said Father
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4187] Mr. Henchy returned with the candlestick and put it on the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4207] "And how does he knock it out?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4232] all about it."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4235] thoughtfully. "I saw the three of them hard at it yesterday at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4275] "What is it?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4296] won't keep it a minute. Leave the basket there."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4322] The old man opened another bottle grudgingly, and handed it to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4335] "That's the way it begins," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4406] the fire, took his bottle and carried it back to the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4418] house property in the city and three places of business and isn't it
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4430] benefit by it. Look at all the factories down by the quays there,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4439] it. Here's this chap come to the throne after his old mother keeping
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4455] good sportsman. Damn it, can't we Irish play fair?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4466] do it for Edward the Seventh?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4490] The old man handed him another bottle and he placed it on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4506] wrote--do you remember? Have you got it on you?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4516] "O, that thing is it.... Sure, that's old now."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4518] "Out with it, man!" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4523] off his hat, laid it on the table and stood up. He seemed to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4544] The Irish heart where'er it be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4584] it had ceased all the auditors drank from their bottles in silence.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4596] Crofton said that it was a very fine piece of writing.
[A Mother] [4606] the end it was Mrs. Kearney who arranged everything.
[A Mother] [4614] accomplishments, waiting for some suitor to brave it and offer her
[A Mother] [4642] If it was not Skerries it was Howth or Greystones.
[A Mother] [4684] "Don't be afraid! Don t be afraid of it! "
[A Mother] [4688] Kathleen's dress. It cost a pretty penny; but there are occasions
[A Mother] [4702] idleness. At first she wondered had she mistaken the hour. No, it
[A Mother] [4710] while he was talking to her, he chewed one end of it into a moist
[A Mother] [4715] their music. When it was nearly half-past eight, the few people in
[A Mother] [4728] asked him to tell her what it meant. Mr. Holohan did not know
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4760] was it true. Yes. it was true.
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4785] public of the treat which was in store for it on the following
[A Mother] [4788] carefully and said that perhaps it would be better if he went with
[A Mother] [4799] to begin. By ill luck it was a rainy evening. Mrs. Kearney placed
[A Mother] [4834] spoke little. He said yous so softly that it passed unnoticed and he
[A Mother] [4840] jealousy with an ebullient friendliness. It was his humour to have
[A Mother] [4844] "Are you in it too? "
[A Mother] [4891] Mr. Holohan said that it wasn't his business.
[A Mother] [4893] "Why isn't it your business?" asked Mrs. Kearney. "Didn't you
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4927] Holohan, "and I'll see it in."
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [4970] and Kathleen looked down, moving the point of her new shoe: it
[A Mother] [5012] theatricals. It was deservedly applauded; and, when it was ended,
[A Mother] [5018] O'Madden Burke said it was the most scandalous exhibition he had
[A Mother] [5086] daughter, gesticulating with them. She waited until it was time for
[Grace] [5187] moustache. He made light of his accident. It was nothing, he said:
[Grace] [5243] "Don't mention it," said the young man.
[Grace] [5252] The car drove off towards Westmoreland Street. As it passed
[Grace] [5264] sheltering it in the shell of his hands, peered again into the mouth
[Grace] [5289] took a mouthful, drew it up, saturated his palate with it and then
[Grace] [5290] spat it forth into the grate. Then he paused to judge.
[Grace] [5311] alls of it. He's been drinking since Friday."
[Grace] [5338] these nights and talk it over."
[Grace] [5347] He got up on the car. As it drove off he raised his hat to her gaily.
[Grace] [5357] Mrs. Kernan's puzzled eyes watched the car till it was out of sight.
[Grace] [5372] irksome and, later on, when she was beginning to find it
[Grace] [5411] happy. People had great sympathy with him, for it was known that
[Grace] [5426] "I leave it all in your hands, Mr. Cunningham."
[Grace] [5436] it could do no harm. Her beliefs were not extravagant. She
[Grace] [5439] was bounded by her kitchen, but, if she was put to it, she could
[Grace] [5452] "It doesn't pain you now?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5476] "It keeps coming like from down in my throat; sickening."
[Grace] [5494] "A chap. I don't know his name. Damn it now, what's his name?
[Grace] [5503] When Mr. Cunningham made that remark, people were silent. It
[Grace] [5536] "O, only for him," said Mr. Power, "it might have been a case of
[Grace] [5541] it happen at all?"
[Grace] [5543] "It happened that you were peloothered, Tom," said Mr.
[Grace] [5556] therefore, as if Mr. Kernan had asked it.
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5589] takes up a wad of cabbage on the spoon and pegs it across the
[Grace] [5590] room and the poor devils have to try and catch it on their plates:
[Grace] [5616] declined it, saying she was ironing downstairs, and, after having
[Grace] [5644] "But we mustn't be late," said Mr. Power earnestly, "because it is
[Grace] [5651] "Half-seven at M'Auley's be it!"
[Grace] [5661] "The opera, is it?" said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5672] "Yes, that's it," said Mr. Cunningham, "Jack and I and M'Coy here
[Grace] [5698] about to concern themselves on his behalf, he thought he owed it
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5718] time or other but the Jesuit Order was never once reformed. It
[Grace] [5746] world all this time and seen most sides of it without being a judge
[Grace] [5755] Purdon is giving it. It's for business men, you know."
[Grace] [5799] "Yes, in the back near the door. I forget now what.... O yes, it was
[Grace] [5800] on the Pope, the late Pope. I remember it well. Upon my word it
[Grace] [5829] "Not a doubt of it," said Mr. Kernan warmly.
[Grace] [5835] "Who is it?"
[Grace] [5876] "No, no," said Mr. Fogarty eagerly. "I think you're wrong there. It
[Grace] [5881] "Allow me," said Mr. Cunningham positively, "it was Lux upon
[Grace] [5926] wonderful when you come to think of it?"
[Grace] [5956] younger then.... Or was it that----?"
[Grace] [5974] bishops there were two men who held out against it while the
[Grace] [5975] others were all for it. The whole conclave except these two was
[Grace] [5976] unanimous. No! They wouldn't have it!"
[Grace] [5989] "What?" cried Mr. Kernan. "Is it John of Tuam?"
[Grace] [5992] thought it was some Italian or American."
[Grace] [5999] "There they were at it, all the cardinals and bishops and
[Grace] [6004] it, stood up and shouted out with the voice of a lion: 'Credo!'"
[Grace] [6017] them as it uttered the word of belief and submission. When Mrs.
[Grace] [6023] it as long as I live."
[Grace] [6031] "It was at the unveiling of Sir John Gray's statue. Edmund Dwyer
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6054] and God knows we want it badly."
[Grace] [6058] Mrs. Kernan thought it would be wiser to conceal her satisfaction.
[Grace] [6065] "If he doesn't like it," he said bluntly, "he can... do the other thing.
[Grace] [6089] "No, damn it all," said Mr. Kernan sensibly, "I draw the line there.
[Grace] [6091] confession, and... all that business. But... no candles! No, damn it
[Grace] [6172] Father Purdon developed the text with resonant assurance. It was
[Grace] [6174] interpret properly. It was a text which might seem to the casual
[Grace] [6177] specially adapted for the guidance of those whose lot it was to lead
[Grace] [6179] manner of worldlings. It was a text for business men and
[The Dead] [6220] scamper along the bare hallway to let in another guest. It was well
[The Dead] [6228] It was always a great affair, the Misses Morkan's annual dance.
[The Dead] [6229] Everybody who knew them came to it, members of the family, old
[The Dead] [6232] pupils too. Never once had it fallen flat. For years and years it had
[The Dead] [6239] it was a day. Mary Jane, who was then a little girl in short clothes,
[The Dead] [6257] then it was long after ten o'clock and yet there was no sign of
[The Dead] [6261] influence; and when he was like that it was sometimes very hard to
[The Dead] [6294] "Is it snowing again, Mr. Conroy?" asked Lily.
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6329] pushed upwards even to his forehead, where it scattered itself in a
[The Dead] [6334] curve behind his ears where it curled slightly beneath the groove
[The Dead] [6341] "O Lily," he said, thrusting it into her hands, "it's Christmastime,
[The Dead] [6342] isn't it? Just... here's a little...."
[The Dead] [6347] take it."
[The Dead] [6357] finish, listening to the skirts that swept against it and to the
[The Dead] [6359] sudden retort. It had cast a gloom over him which he tried to dispel
[The Dead] [6396] cold Gretta got out of it? Cab windows rattling all the way, and the
[The Dead] [6397] east wind blowing in after we passed Merrion. Very jolly it was.
[The Dead] [6413] poor child! And she simply hates the sight of it!... O, but you'll
[The Dead] [6436] boots, Gretta, isn't it?"
[The Dead] [6446] "It's nothing very wonderful, but Gretta thinks it very funny
[The Dead] [6461] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate again. "What a comfort it is to have a
[The Dead] [6494] Thanks for your beautiful waltz, Miss Daly. It made lovely time."
[The Dead] [6541] to have said: 'Now, Mary Grimes, if I don't take it, make me take it,
[The Dead] [6542] for I feel I want it.'"
[The Dead] [6586] it?"
[The Dead] [6649] no melody for him and he doubted whether it had any melody for
[The Dead] [6655] herself, her hands racing along the key-board or lifted from it at
[The Dead] [6662] beside it was a picture of the two murdered princes in the Tower
[The Dead] [6667] little foxes' heads upon it, lined with brown satin and having round
[The Dead] [6668] mulberry buttons. It was strange that his mother had had no
[The Dead] [6673] was pointing out something in it to Constantine who, dressed in a
[The Dead] [6674] man-o-war suit, lay at her feet. It was she who had chosen the
[The Dead] [6682] Gretta at all. It was Gretta who had nursed her during all her last
[The Dead] [6700] of her collar bore on it an Irish device and motto.
[The Dead] [6710] "What is it?" asked Gabriel, smiling at her solemn manner.
[The Dead] [6726] A look of perplexity appeared on Gabriel's face. It was true that he
[The Dead] [6756] this summer? We're going to stay there a whole month. It will be
[The Dead] [6758] coming, and Mr. Kilkelly and Kathleen Kearney. It would be
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6801] own country, sick of it!"
[The Dead] [6826] stout feeble old woman with white hair. Her voice had a catch in it
[The Dead] [6884] it for their dinner.
[The Dead] [6894] trembling fingers tapped the cold pane of the window. How cool it
[The Dead] [6895] must be outside! How pleasant it would be to walk out alone, first
[The Dead] [6898] top of the Wellington Monument. How much more pleasant it
[The Dead] [6907] been any ill-feeling between them until that night. It unnerved him
[The Dead] [6914] I think it had certain qualities of hospitality, of humour, of
[The Dead] [6926] room, gradually ceased. Gabriel recognised the prelude. It was that
[The Dead] [6934] from the invisible supper-table. It sounded so genuine that a little
[The Dead] [6943] both his hands, shaking it when words failed him or the catch in
[The Dead] [6947] well, never. No, I never heard your voice so good as it is tonight.
[The Dead] [6986] "Well, isn't it for the honour of God, Aunt Kate?" asked Mary Jane,
[The Dead] [6994] whipper-snappers of boys over their heads. I suppose it is for the
[The Dead] [6995] good of the Church if the pope does it. But it's not just, Mary Jane,
[The Dead] [6999] in defence of her sister for it was a sore subject with her but Mary
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7095] piano a pudding in a huge yellow dish lay in waiting and behind it
[The Dead] [7170] "It takes Teddy to find out the really good things," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7174] sharply. "Is it because he's only a black?"
[The Dead] [7178] Mignon. Of course it was very fine, she said, but it made her think
[The Dead] [7203] "Maybe so," said Mr. Browne. "But I may tell you I doubt it
[The Dead] [7232] she received praises for it from all quarters She herself said that it
[The Dead] [7241] ate it with his pudding. He had been told that celery was a capital
[The Dead] [7250] a chap can go down there and put up there as if it were a hotel and
[The Dead] [7262] did it for.
[The Dead] [7268] Aunt Kate repeated that it was the rule, that was all. Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [7279] As the subject had grown lugubrious it was buried in a silence of
[The Dead] [7314] "It has fallen to my lot this evening, as in years past, to perform a
[The Dead] [7325] "Ladies and Gentlemen, it is not the first time that we have
[The Dead] [7327] board. It is not the first time that we have been the recipients--or
[The Dead] [7336] no tradition which does it so much honour and which it should
[The Dead] [7337] guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is
[The Dead] [7340] perhaps, that with us it is rather a failing than anything to be
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7350] A hearty murmur of assent ran round the table. It shot through
[The Dead] [7357] actuated by new ideas and new principles. It is serious and
[The Dead] [7358] enthusiastic for these new ideas and its enthusiasm, even when it is
[The Dead] [7362] hypereducated as it is, will lack those qualities of humanity, of
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7407] For when I view them in turn, whether it be our chief hostess
[The Dead] [7512] "It makes me feel cold to look at you two gentlemen muffled up
[The Dead] [7573] Mary Jane ran to open it and let in Freddy Malins. Freddy Malins,
[The Dead] [7625] her skirt which the shadow made appear black and white. It was
[The Dead] [7667] before she reached it the singing stopped and the piano was closed
[The Dead] [7698] "They say," said Mary Jane, "we haven't had snow like it for thirty
[The Dead] [7712] him advice and said it was a great pity and urged him to be very
[The Dead] [7726] remember it properly. Why? Do you know it?"
[The Dead] [7761] houses and the river; and the sky seemed to be descending. It was
[The Dead] [7781] beside his breakfast-cup and he was caressing it with his hand.
[The Dead] [7787] bottles in a roaring furnace. It was very cold. Her face, fragrant in
[The Dead] [7793] But the man could not hear with the noise of the furnace. It was
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7806] dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be
[The Dead] [7822] its rattling noise as it saved him from conversation. She was
[The Dead] [7839] he nodded familiarly to it and waved his hand.
[The Dead] [7908] that the words would not pass Gabriel's lips. No, it was not the
[The Dead] [7925] "What is it?"
[The Dead] [7933] him, and I didn't expect it, really. It's a pity he wouldn't keep away
[The Dead] [7962] smoothing it back, scarcely touching it with his fingers. The
[The Dead] [7963] washing had made it fine and brilliant. His heart was brimming
[The Dead] [7964] over with happiness. Just when he was wishing for it she had come
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [7992] always puzzled him when he saw it in a mirror, and his
[The Dead] [8009] "It was a person I used to know in Galway when I was living with
[The Dead] [8018] "It was a young boy I used to know," she answered, "named
[The Dead] [8052] seventeen. Isn't it a terrible thing to die so young as that?"
[The Dead] [8078] Her voice was veiled and sad. Gabriel, feeling now how vain it
[The Dead] [8082] "And what did he die of so young, Gretta? Consumption, was it?"
[The Dead] [8089] vague world. But he shook himself free of it with an effort of
[The Dead] [8092] warm and moist: it did not respond to his touch, but he continued
[The Dead] [8093] to caress it just as he had caressed her first letter to him that spring
[The Dead] [8096] "It was in the winter," she said, "about the beginning of the winter
[The Dead] [8113] "And then when it came to the time for me to leave Galway and
[The Dead] [8144] intruding on her grief, let it fall gently and walked quietly to the
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how
[The Dead] [8164] face was no longer beautiful, but he knew that it was no longer the
[The Dead] [8170] fallen down: the fellow of it lay upon its side. He wondered at his
[The Dead] [8171] riot of emotions of an hour before. From what had it proceeded?
[The Dead] [8205] A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It
[The Dead] [8209] newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was
[The Dead] [8212] falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too,
[The Dead] [8214] Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and