Dubliners by James Joyce
My

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 182 occurrences of the word:   my

[The Sisters] [12] myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my
[The Sisters] [19] downstairs to supper. While my aunt was ladling out my stirabout
[The Sisters] [23] queer... there was something uncanny about him. I'll tell you my
[The Sisters] [31] "I have my own theory about it," he said. "I think it was one of
[The Sisters] [34] He began to puff again at his pipe without giving us his theory. My
[The Sisters] [48] news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [53] "God have mercy on his soul," said my aunt piously.
[The Sisters] [57] looking up from my plate. He returned to his pipe and finally spat
[The Sisters] [63] "How do you mean, Mr. Cotter?" asked my aunt.
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [69] "That's my principle, too," said my uncle. "Let him learn to box his
[The Sisters] [71] take exercise. Why, when I was a nipper every morning of my life
[The Sisters] [74] pick of that leg mutton," he added to my aunt.
[The Sisters] [78] My aunt brought the dish from the safe and put it on the table.
[The Sisters] [87] I crammed my mouth with stirabout for fear I might give utterance
[The Sisters] [88] to my anger. Tiresome old red-nosed imbecile!
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [92] from his unfinished sentences. In the dark of my room I imagined
[The Sisters] [94] blankets over my head and tried to think of Christmas. But the grey
[The Sisters] [96] desired to confess something. I felt my soul receding into some
[The Sisters] [123] great-coat. Perhaps my aunt would have given me a packet of High
[The Sisters] [142] death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night
[The Sisters] [178] In the evening my aunt took me with her to visit the house of
[The Sisters] [182] unseemly to have shouted at her, my aunt shook hands with her for
[The Sisters] [183] all. The old woman pointed upwards interrogatively and, on my
[The Sisters] [187] encouragingly towards the open door of the dead-room. My aunt
[The Sisters] [195] but I could not gather my thoughts because the old woman's
[The Sisters] [209] we found Eliza seated in his arm-chair in state. I groped my way
[The Sisters] [210] towards my usual chair in the corner while Nannie went to the
[The Sisters] [217] somewhat disappointed at my refusal and went over quietly to the
[The Sisters] [221] My aunt waited until Eliza sighed and then said:
[The Sisters] [225] Eliza sighed again and bowed her head in assent. My aunt fingered
[The Sisters] [243] "He looks quite resigned," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [249] "Yes, indeed," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [275] "Wasn't that good of him?" said my aunt
[The Sisters] [282] "Indeed, that's true," said my aunt. "And I'm sure now that he's
[The Sisters] [290] "It's when it's all over that you'll miss him," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [316] "The Lord have mercy on his soul!" said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [326] "Yes," said my aunt. "He was a disappointed man. You could see
[The Sisters] [330] I approached the table and tasted my sherry and then returned
[The Sisters] [331] quietly to my chair in the comer. Eliza seemed to have fallen into a
[The Sisters] [340] "And was that it?" said my aunt. "I heard something...."
[An Encounter] [394] West were remote from my nature but, at least, they opened doors
[An Encounter] [421] Dillon awakened one of my consciences. But when the restraining
[An Encounter] [430] The summer holidays were near at hand when I made up my mind
[An Encounter] [443] showing them my own sixpence. When we were making the last
[An Encounter] [450] bridge as I lived nearest. I hid my books in the long grass near the
[An Encounter] [454] my frail canvas shoes which I had diligently pipeclayed overnight
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [460] to an air in my head. I was very happy.
[An Encounter] [509] under my eyes. School and home seemed to recede from us and
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [624] and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking
[An Encounter] [631] As I neither answered nor raised my eyes Mahony exclaimed
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [661] under a twitching forehead. I turned my eyes away again.
[An Encounter] [677] Lest I should betray my agitation I delayed a few moments
[An Encounter] [678] pretending to fix my shoe properly and then, saying that I was
[An Encounter] [680] my heart was beating quickly with fear that he would seize me by
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[An Encounter] [687] of my paltry stratagem. I had to call the name again before
[An Encounter] [688] Mahony saw me and hallooed in answer. How my heart beat as he
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [727] kitchen windows had filled the areas. If my uncle was seen turning
[Araby] [741] that I could not be seen. When she came out on the doorstep my
[Araby] [742] heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I
[Araby] [743] kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near
[Araby] [744] the point at which our ways diverged, I quickened my pace and
[Araby] [747] was like a summons to all my foolish blood.
[Araby] [750] romance. On Saturday evenings when my aunt went marketing I
[Araby] [758] bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes. Her name sprang
[Araby] [759] to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I
[Araby] [760] myself did not understand. My eyes were often full of tears (I
[Araby] [761] could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to
[Araby] [762] pour itself out into my bosom. I thought little of the future. I did
[Araby] [764] her, how I could tell her of my confused adoration. But my body
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Araby] [775] from them, I pressed the palms of my hands together until they
[Araby] [799] What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping
[Araby] [802] my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between
[Araby] [804] were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated
[Araby] [806] to the bazaar on Saturday night. My aunt was surprised and hoped
[Araby] [808] class. I watched my master's face pass from amiability to
[Araby] [809] sternness; he hoped I was not beginning to idle. I could not call my
[Araby] [811] serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my
[Araby] [814] On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to
[Araby] [822] towards the school. The air was pitilessly raw and already my heart
[Araby] [825] When I came home to dinner my uncle had not yet been home.
[Araby] [830] singing. From the front window I saw my companions playing
[Araby] [832] indistinct and, leaning my forehead against the cool glass, I looked
[Araby] [834] an hour, seeing nothing but the brown-clad figure cast by my
[Araby] [843] and still my uncle did not come. Mrs. Mercer stood up to go: she
[Araby] [847] room, clenching my fists. My aunt said:
[Araby] [851] At nine o'clock I heard my uncle's latchkey in the halldoor. I heard
[Araby] [859] I did not smile. My aunt said to him energetically:
[Araby] [864] My uncle said he was very sorry he had forgotten. He said he
[Araby] [869] opening lines of the piece to my aunt.
[Araby] [871] I held a florin tightly in my hand as I strode down Buckingham
[Araby] [873] buyers and glaring with gas recalled to me the purpose of my
[Araby] [874] journey. I took my seat in a third-class carriage of a deserted train.
[Araby] [928] I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless, to
[Araby] [929] make my interest in her wares seem the more real. Then I turned
[Araby] [931] the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a
[Araby] [936] derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1488] "There's nothing to touch a good slavey," he affirmed. "Take my
[The Boarding House] [2051] moaning softly: "O my God!"
[A Little Cloud] [2193] "Half time now, boys," he used to say light-heartedly. "Where's my
[A Little Cloud] [2282] "You don't know what's good for you, my boy," said Ignatius
[A Little Cloud] [2311] mornings when I had a sore head and a fur on my tongue. You'd
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2401] "I'll tell you my opinion," said Ignatius Gallaher, emerging after
[A Little Cloud] [2434] "I hope it's not too late in the day to offer my best wishes," said
[A Little Cloud] [2465] back. My wife will be delighted to meet you. We can have a little
[A Little Cloud] [2533] "No blooming fear of that, my boy. I'm going to have my fling first
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2563] You wait a while my boy. See if I don't play my cards properly.
[A Little Cloud] [2642] Whilst I return to view my Margaret's tomb
[A Little Cloud] [2701] "My little man! My little mannie! Was 'ou frightened, love?...
[Counterparts] [2778] "Eh? Are you going to stand there all day? Upon my word,
[Counterparts] [2976] Then I looked back at him again--taking my time, you know. 'I
[Counterparts] [2997] imitated Farrington, saying, "And here was my nabs, as cool as you
[Counterparts] [3149] "What's for my dinner?"
[Clay] [3193] always soothingly: "Yes, my dear," and "No, my dear." She was
[Clay] [3225] "Mamma is mamma but Maria is my proper mother."
[Clay] [3418] With vassals and serfs at my side,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4231] H.,' he said. Yerra, sure the little hop-o'- my-thumb has forgotten
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4248] "Driving out of the Mansion House," said Mr. Henchy, "in all my
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4254] "Yes. And I'll make Father Keon my private chaplain. We'll have a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4330] "Here's my best respects, sir, to Mr. Henchy," drank the contents,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4391] "Which is my bottle?" he asked.
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [5056] "I haven't seen any committee," said Mrs. Kearney angrily. "My
[A Mother] [5068] "I'm asking for my rights." she said.
[A Mother] [5072] "Might I, indeed?... And when I ask when my daughter is going to
[A Mother] [5077] "You must speak to the secretary. It's not my business. I'm a great
[Grace] [5472] something keeps coming into my throat, phlegm or----"
[Grace] [5476] "It keeps coming like from down in my throat; sickening."
[Grace] [5608] my opinion!"
[Grace] [5622] "O, you! The back of my hand to you!" said Mrs. Kernan tartly.
[Grace] [5800] on the Pope, the late Pope. I remember it well. Upon my word it
[Grace] [6041] properly taped, my lad. He had an eye like a hawk."
[Grace] [6066] I'll just tell him my little tale of woe. I'm not such a bad fellow----"
[Grace] [6205] "Well, I have verified my accounts. I find all well."
[Grace] [6210] "Well, I have looked into my accounts. I find this wrong and this
[Grace] [6212] right my accounts."
[The Dead] [6271] "I'll engage they did," said Gabriel, "but they forget that my wife
[The Dead] [6422] underfoot I must put on my galoshes. Tonight even, he wanted me
[The Dead] [6492] here. I always feel easier in my mind when he's here.... Julia,
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6800] "0, to tell you the truth," retorted Gabriel suddenly, "I'm sick of my
[The Dead] [6913] now on the wane among us may have had its faults but for my part
[The Dead] [6946] "I was just telling my mother," he said, "I never heard you sing so
[The Dead] [6948] Now! Would you believe that now? That's the truth. Upon my
[The Dead] [6958] "Miss Julia Morkan, my latest discovery!"
[The Dead] [7149] draught, "kindly forget my existence, ladies and gentlemen, for a
[The Dead] [7314] "It has fallen to my lot this evening, as in years past, to perform a
[The Dead] [7315] very pleasing task but a task for which I am afraid my poor powers
[The Dead] [7322] while I endeavour to express to you in words what my feelings are
[The Dead] [7338] unique as far as my experience goes (and I have visited not a few
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7406] task would be an invidious one and one beyond my poor powers.
[The Dead] [7656] O, the rain falls on my heavy locks
[The Dead] [7657] And the dew wets my skin,
[The Dead] [7658] My babe lies cold...
[The Dead] [8010] my grandmother," she said.
[The Dead] [8097] when I was going to leave my grandmother's and come up here to
[The Dead] [8122] "Then the night before I left, I was in my grandmother's house in