Dubliners by James Joyce
No

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 169 occurrences of the word:   no

[The Sisters] [3] THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.
[The Sisters] [22] "No, I wouldn't say he was exactly... but there was something
[The Sisters] [26] He began to puff at his pipe, no doubt arranging his opinion in his
[The Sisters] [76] "No, no, not for me," said old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [109] Umbrellas Re-covered . No notice was visible now for the shutters
[The Sisters] [160] intricate questions. Often when I thought of this I could make no
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [218] sofa where she sat down behind her sister. No one spoke: we all
[The Sisters] [247] resigned. No one would think he'd make such a beautiful corpse."
[The Sisters] [279] "Ah, there's no friends like the old friends," she said, "when all is
[The Sisters] [280] said and done, no friends that a body can trust."
[The Sisters] [286] "Ah, poor James!" said Eliza. "He was no great trouble to us. You
[The Sisters] [310] carriages that makes no noise that Father O'Rourke told him about,
[The Sisters] [345] himself, talking to no one and wandering about by himself. So one
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[An Encounter] [470] hour more but still there was no sign of Leo Dillon. Mahony, at
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [657] whipping. A slap on the hand or a box on the ear was no good:
[An Encounter] [668] give him such a whipping as no boy ever got in this world. He said
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [780] me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It
[Araby] [865] believed in the old saying: "All work and no play makes Jack a
[Araby] [921] "No, thank you."
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1010] squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to
[Eveline] [1118] No! No! No! It was impossible. Her hands clutched the iron in
[Eveline] [1125] to him, passive, like a helpless animal. Her eyes gave him no sign
[After the Race] [1292] A torrent of talk followed. Farley was an American. No one knew
[Two Gallants] [1409] He was insensitive to all kinds of discourtesy. No one knew how
[Two Gallants] [1560] Lenehan said no more. He did not wish to ruffle his friend's
[Two Gallants] [1672] of no way of passing them but to keep on walking. He turned to the
[Two Gallants] [1759] him the slip. His eyes searched the street: there was no sign of
[Two Gallants] [1773] would fail; he knew it was no go.
[The Boarding House] [1826] headlong into debt. It was no use making him take the pledge: he
[The Boarding House] [1891] persistent silence could not be misunderstood. There had been no
[The Boarding House] [1892] open complicity between mother and daughter, no open
[The Boarding House] [1906] by their self-contained demeanour no less than by the little
[The Boarding House] [2070] little paler than usual, kept smiling and saying that there was no
[The Boarding House] [2083] into a reverie. There was no longer any perturbation visible on her
[The Boarding House] [2088] future. Her hopes and visions were so intricate that she no longer
[A Little Cloud] [2154] Little Chandler gave them no thought. He picked his way deftly
[A Little Cloud] [2157] had roystered. No memory of the past touched him, for his mind
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2256] water. Soda? Lithia? No mineral? I'm the same Spoils the
[A Little Cloud] [2334] no city like Paris for gaiety, movement, excitement...."
[A Little Cloud] [2378] "Ah," he said, "you may say what you like. There's no woman like
[A Little Cloud] [2389] "No, really...."
[A Little Cloud] [2533] "No blooming fear of that, my boy. I'm going to have my fling first
[A Little Cloud] [2552] "If ever it occurs, you may bet your bottom dollar there'll be no
[A Little Cloud] [2570] "But I'm in no hurry. They can wait. I don't fancy tying myself up
[A Little Cloud] [2578] arms. To save money they kept no servant but Annie's young sister
[A Little Cloud] [2618] him. They repelled him and defied him: there was no passion in
[A Little Cloud] [2619] them, no rapture. He thought of what Gallaher had said about rich
[A Little Cloud] [2698] Giving no heed to him she began to walk up and down the room,
[Counterparts] [2793] written: In no case shall the said Bernard Bodley be... The evening
[Counterparts] [2804] complete, offered no remark. As soon as he was on the landing the
[Counterparts] [2866] desk. He stared intently at the incomplete phrase: In no case shall
[Counterparts] [2884] cashier privately for an advance? No, the cashier was no good, no
[Counterparts] [2913] was astounded (the author of the witticism no less than his
[Counterparts] [2931] the cashier came out with the chief clerk. It was no use trying to
[Counterparts] [2952] than a bob--and a bob was no use. Yet he must get money
[Counterparts] [3131] "No, pa. Tom."
[Counterparts] [3166] boy looked about him wildly but, seeing no way of escape, fell
[Clay] [3193] always soothingly: "Yes, my dear," and "No, my dear." She was
[Clay] [3337] eaten it--by mistake, of course--but the children all said no and
[Clay] [3371] blood but Joe said that Alphy was no brother of his and there was
[Clay] [3395] next-door girls and told her to throw it out at once: that was no
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[Clay] [3429] her song Joe was very much moved. He said that there was no time
[Clay] [3430] like the long ago and no music for him like poor old Balfe,
[A Painful Case] [3472] character; but there was no harshness in the eyes which, looking at
[A Painful Case] [3562] which was the produce of a leisure not within their reach. No
[A Painful Case] [3713] possibility of similar accidents in the future. No blame attached to
[A Painful Case] [3738] had ever done. He had no difficulty now in approving of the course
[A Painful Case] [3792] wished him gone. No one wanted him; he was outcast from life's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3966] "The working-man," said Mr. Hynes, "gets all kicks and no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3992] "If this man was alive," he said, pointing to the leaf, "we'd have no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4005] "No money, boys," he said.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4042] "It's no go," said Mr. Henchy, shaking his head. "I asked the little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4126] "There's no knowing," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4159] "O, no, no, no!" said Father Keon quickly, pursing his lips as if he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4164] "No, no, no!" said Father Keon, speaking in a discreet, indulgent,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4171] "No, no, thank you. It was just a little business matter," said Father
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4179] "No, but the stairs is so dark."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4181] "No, no, I can see.... Thank you, indeed."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4213] "No," said Mr. Henchy, "I think he's travelling on his own
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4304] "There's no tumblers," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4380] "How can I?" said the old man, "when there's no corkscrew? "
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4502] renege him. By God, I'll say for you, Joe! No, by God, you stuck to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4558] Of fawning priests--no friends of his.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4567] No sound of strife disturb his sleep!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4568] Calmly he rests: no human pain
[A Mother] [4616] and she gave them no encouragement, trying to console her
[A Mother] [4702] idleness. At first she wondered had she mistaken the hour. No, it
[A Mother] [4735] Mr. Holohan admitted that the artistes were no good but the
[A Mother] [4811] "No, thank you!"
[A Mother] [4924] stay no longer he took leave of her regretfully.
[A Mother] [4949] ready with his music but the accompanist made no sign. Evidently
[A Mother] [4982] very fine. The conversation went no further. The first tenor bent
[Grace] [5128] bar asked everyone who he was and who was with him. No one
[Grace] [5134] "No, sir. There was two gentlemen with him."
[Grace] [5138] No one knew; a voice said:
[Grace] [5150] The manager asked repeatedly did no one know who the injured
[Grace] [5211] "No bones broken. What? Can you walk?"
[Grace] [5374] presented to her no insuperable difficulties and for twenty-five
[Grace] [5436] it could do no harm. Her beliefs were not extravagant. She
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5471] "No," said Mr. Kernan. "I think I caught cold on the car. There's
[Grace] [5663] "No, no," said Mr. Cunningham in an evasive tone, "it's just a
[Grace] [5699] to his dignity to show a stiff neck. He took no part in the
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5711] well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit. They're the boyos
[Grace] [5876] "No, no," said Mr. Fogarty eagerly. "I think you're wrong there. It
[Grace] [5899] "That's no joke, I can tell you."
[Grace] [5911] "No superfluities," said Mr. Fogarty.
[Grace] [5976] unanimous. No! They wouldn't have it!"
[Grace] [5983] "Dowling was no German, and that's a sure five," said Mr. Power,
[Grace] [6089] "No, damn it all," said Mr. Kernan sensibly, "I draw the line there.
[Grace] [6091] confession, and... all that business. But... no candles! No, damn it
[Grace] [6106] "No candles!" repeated Mr. Kernan obdurately. "That's off!"
[Grace] [6189] He told his hearers that he was there that evening for no terrifying,
[Grace] [6190] no extravagant purpose; but as a man of the world speaking to his
[The Dead] [6257] then it was long after ten o'clock and yet there was no sign of
[The Dead] [6313] "O no, sir," she answered. "I'm done schooling this year and more."
[The Dead] [6346] "O no, sir!" cried the girl, following him. "Really, sir, I wouldn't
[The Dead] [6394] "No," said Gabriel, turning to his wife, "we had quite enough of
[The Dead] [6618] "O, no, hardly noticeable."
[The Dead] [6649] no melody for him and he doubted whether it had any melody for
[The Dead] [6668] mulberry buttons. It was strange that his mother had had no
[The Dead] [6812] "Of course, you've no answer."
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6859] "No row. Why? Did she say so?"
[The Dead] [6864] "There was no row," said Gabriel moodily, "only she wanted me to
[The Dead] [6924] then, as Mary Jane seated herself on the stool, and Aunt Julia, no
[The Dead] [6941] when he could clap no more, he stood up suddenly and hurried
[The Dead] [6947] well, never. No, I never heard your voice so good as it is tonight.
[The Dead] [6982] "No," continued Aunt Kate, "she wouldn't be said or led by anyone,
[The Dead] [7152] He set to his supper and took no part in the conversation with
[The Dead] [7165] "No," answered Mr. Bartell D'Arcy carelessly.
[The Dead] [7318] "No, no!" said Mr. Browne.
[The Dead] [7336] no tradition which does it so much honour and which it should
[The Dead] [7504] "O no, Aunt Kate," said Mary Jane. "Bartell D'Arcy and Miss
[The Dead] [7770] skirt up from the slush. She had no longer any grace of attitude,
[The Dead] [7798] stars moments of their life together, that no one knew of or would
[The Dead] [7806] dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be
[The Dead] [7908] that the words would not pass Gabriel's lips. No, it was not the
[The Dead] [7917] "No, tired: that's all."
[The Dead] [7940] brutal. No, he must see some ardour in her eyes first. He longed to
[The Dead] [8164] face was no longer beautiful, but he knew that it was no longer the