Dubliners by James Joyce
Old

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 148 occurrences of the word:   old

[The Sisters] [18] Old Cotter was sitting at the fire, smoking, when I came
[The Sisters] [27] mind. Tiresome old fool! When we knew him first he used to be
[The Sisters] [37] "Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear."
[The Sisters] [48] news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [50] "The youngster and he were great friends. The old chap taught him
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [76] "No, no, not for me," said old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [83] "It's bad for children," said old Cotter, "because their mind are so
[The Sisters] [88] to my anger. Tiresome old red-nosed imbecile!
[The Sisters] [90] It was late when I fell asleep. Though I was angry with old Cotter
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[The Sisters] [183] all. The old woman pointed upwards interrogatively and, on my
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [195] but I could not gather my thoughts because the old woman's
[The Sisters] [198] trodden down all to one side. The fancy came to me that the old
[The Sisters] [279] "Ah, there's no friends like the old friends," she said, "when all is
[The Sisters] [307] over he'd go out for a drive one fine day just to see the old house
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[An Encounter] [369] little library made up of old numbers of The Union Jack , Pluck
[An Encounter] [380] capered round the garden, an old tea-cosy on his head, beating a
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[An Encounter] [556] fairly old for his moustache was ashen-grey. When he passed at
[An Encounter] [634] "I say... He's a queer old josser!"
[Araby] [705] littered with old useless papers. Among these I found a few
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Araby] [865] believed in the old saying: "All work and no play makes Jack a
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1058] father was becoming old lately, she noticed; he would miss her.
[After the Race] [1267] English madrigal, deploring the loss of old instruments. Riviere,
[After the Race] [1299] Station. The ticket-collector saluted Jimmy; he was an old man:
[Two Gallants] [1426] two bloody fine cigars--O, the real cheese, you know, that the old
[The Boarding House] [1982] heard in his excited imagination old Mr. Leonard calling out in his
[A Little Cloud] [2130] golden dust on the untidy nurses and decrepit old men who
[A Little Cloud] [2156] the gaunt spectral mansions in which the old nobility of Dublin
[A Little Cloud] [2206] tramps, huddled together along the riverbanks, their old coats
[A Little Cloud] [2218] mind. He was not so old--thirty-two. His temperament might be
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2259] saw you last? Dear God, how old we're getting! Do you see any
[A Little Cloud] [2276] old country. Does a fellow good, a bit of a holiday. I feel a ton
[A Little Cloud] [2286] odd half-one or so when I meet any of the old crowd: that's all."
[A Little Cloud] [2289] old times and old acquaintance."
[A Little Cloud] [2293] "I met some of the old gang today," said Ignatius Gallaher. "O'Hara
[A Little Cloud] [2351] London amid the bustle and competition of the Press. The old
[A Little Cloud] [2418] "Ah, well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "here we are in old jog- along
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2441] old chap, and tons of money, and may you never die till I shoot
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2468] "Thanks awfully, old chap," said Ignatius Gallaher, "I'm sorry we
[A Little Cloud] [2473] "I'm awfully sorry, old man. You see I'm over here with another
[Clay] [3274] was glad of her old brown waterproof. The tram was full and she
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3408] would she not sing some little song before she went, one of the old
[Clay] [3430] like the long ago and no music for him like poor old Balfe,
[A Painful Case] [3440] and pretentious. He lived in an old sombre house and from his
[A Painful Case] [3497] they died. He performed these two social duties for old dignity's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3810] OLD JACK raked the cinders together with a piece of cardboard
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3815] light. It was an old man's face, very bony and hairy. The moist blue
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3838] "I'll get you a match," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3857] the Committee Room in Wicklow Street with Jack, the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3863] lapel of his coat. The old man watched him attentively and then,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3874] "Only I'm an old man now I'd change his tune for him. I'd take the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3888] "Nineteen," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3896] Mr. O'Connor shook his head in sympathy, and the old man fell
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3902] "Who's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3917] Mr. O'Connor shook his head. The old man left the hearth and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3942] The old man returned to his seat by the fire, saying:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3948] "Colgan," said the old man scornfully.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3964] old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3972] "How's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3987] The three men fell silent. The old man began to rake more cinders
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3997] "Musha, God be with them times!" said the old man. "There was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4007] "Sit down here, Mr. Henchy," said the old man, offering him his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4013] the old man vacated.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4040] The old man went out of the room.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4054] hell! I suppose he forgets the time his little old father kept the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4065] The old man returned with a few lumps of coal which he placed
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4080] He went out of the room slowly. Neither Mr. Henchy nor the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4106] "Poor old Larry Hynes! Many a good turn he did in his day! But I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4113] the old man. "Let him work for his own side and not come spying
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4126] "There's no knowing," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4219] "I'm dry too," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4257] "Faith, Mr. Henchy," said the old man, "you'd keep up better style
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4258] than some of them. I was talking one day to old Keegan, the porter.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4275] "What is it?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4280] The old man helped the boy to transfer the bottles from the basket
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4286] "What bottles?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4292] "Come back tomorrow," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4304] "There's no tumblers," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4314] The boy came back with the corkscrew. The old man opened three
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4322] The old man opened another bottle grudgingly, and handed it to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4329] As the old man said nothing further, the boy took the bottle. said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4335] "That's the way it begins," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4339] The old man distributed the three bottles which he had opened and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4380] "How can I?" said the old man, "when there's no corkscrew? "
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4414] Ward of Dawson Street. Fine old chap he is, too--regular old toff,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4415] old Conservative! 'But isn't your candidate a Nationalist?' said he.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4432] worked the old industries, the mills, the ship-building yards and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4439] it. Here's this chap come to the throne after his old mother keeping
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4490] The old man handed him another bottle and he placed it on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4516] "O, that thing is it.... Sure, that's old now."
[A Mother] [4675] slipped the doubtful items in between the old favourites. Mr.
[A Mother] [4917] Miss Healy stood in front of him, talking and laughing. He was old
[A Mother] [5004] voice, with all the old-fashioned mannerisms of intonation and
[A Mother] [5006] looked as if she had been resurrected from an old stage-wardrobe
[Grace] [5197] "Hallo, Tom, old man! What's the trouble?"
[Grace] [5276] Mr. Kernan was a commercial traveller of the old school which
[Grace] [5486] "I'm very much obliged to you, old man," said the invalid.
[Grace] [5827] "our religion is the religion, the old, original faith."
[Grace] [5859] "I wouldn't doubt you, old man. Open that, Jack, will you?"
[Grace] [5906] "The old system was the best: plain honest education. None of
[Grace] [5939] old popes--not exactly ... you know... up to the knocker?"
[Grace] [6032] Gray was speaking, blathering away, and here was this old fellow,
[Grace] [6033] crabbed-looking old chap, looking at him from under his bushy
[Grace] [6138] of the newly elected councillors of the ward. To the right sat old
[Grace] [6142] Freeman's Journal, and poor O'Carroll, an old friend of Mr.
[The Dead] [6229] Everybody who knew them came to it, members of the family, old
[The Dead] [6244] the Kingstown and Dalkey line. Old as they were, her aunts also
[The Dead] [6247] go about much, gave music lessons to beginners on the old square
[The Dead] [6376] dressing-room. His aunts were two small, plainly dressed old
[The Dead] [6384] apple, and her hair, braided in the same old-fashioned way, had not
[The Dead] [6826] stout feeble old woman with white hair. Her voice had a catch in it
[The Dead] [6918] were only two ignorant old women?
[The Dead] [6927] of an old song of Aunt Julia's--Arrayed for the Bridal. Her voice,
[The Dead] [6936] music-stand the old leather-bound songbook that had her initials
[The Dead] [7009] "O, I don't question the pope's being right. I'm only a stupid old
[The Dead] [7093] apples, two squat old-fashioned decanters of cut glass, one
[The Dead] [7180] the old Italian companies that used to come to Dublin--Tietjens,
[The Dead] [7184] the top gallery of the old Royal used to be packed night after night,
[The Dead] [7190] play the grand old operas now, he asked, Dinorah, Lucrezia
[The Dead] [7221] hearing of old Parkinson but he's too far back for me."
[The Dead] [7529] explained Gabriel, "commonly known in his later years as the old
[The Dead] [7535] "Well, glue or starch," said Gabriel, "the old gentleman had a horse
[The Dead] [7536] by the name of Johnny. And Johnny used to work in the old
[The Dead] [7539] Johnny. One fine day the old gentleman thought he'd like to drive
[The Dead] [7545] "Amen," said Gabriel. "So the old gentleman, as I said, harnessed
[The Dead] [7566] "Round and round he went," said Gabriel, "and the old gentleman,
[The Dead] [7567] who was a very pompous old gentleman, was highly indignant. 'Go
[The Dead] [7650] hand for them to be silent. The song seemed to be in the old Irish
[The Dead] [7826] old rattling box after his heels, and Gabriel was again in a cab with
[The Dead] [7864] An old man was dozing in a great hooded chair in the hall. He lit a