Dubliners by James Joyce
S

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 6 occurrences of the word:   s

[The Sisters] [32] those ... peculiar cases .... But it's hard to say...."
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [69] "That's my principle, too," said my uncle. "Let him learn to box his
[The Sisters] [70] corner. That's what I'm always saying to that Rosicrucian there:
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [83] "It's bad for children," said old Cotter, "because their mind are so
[The Sisters] [107] consisted mainly of children's bootees and umbrellas; and on
[The Sisters] [115] The Rev. James Flynn (formerly of S. Catherine's Church,
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[The Sisters] [184] aunt's nodding, proceeded to toil up the narrow staircase before us,
[The Sisters] [195] but I could not gather my thoughts because the old woman's
[The Sisters] [213] little glass of wine. Then, at her sister's bidding, she filled out the
[The Sisters] [223] "Ah, well, he's gone to a better world."
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [266] "There's poor Nannie," said Eliza, looking at her, "she's wore out.
[The Sisters] [272] notice for the Freeman's General and took charge of all the papers
[The Sisters] [273] for the cemetery and poor James's insurance."
[The Sisters] [279] "Ah, there's no friends like the old friends," she said, "when all is
[The Sisters] [282] "Indeed, that's true," said my aunt. "And I'm sure now that he's
[The Sisters] [288] he's gone and all to that...."
[The Sisters] [290] "It's when it's all over that you'll miss him," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [312] Johnny Rush's over the way there and drive out the three of us
[The Sisters] [337] But still.... They say it was the boy's fault. But poor James was so
[An Encounter] [375] bouts ended with Joe Dillon's war dance of victory. His parents
[An Encounter] [407] Everyone's heart palpitated as Leo Dillon handed up the paper and
[An Encounter] [432] With Leo Dillon and a boy named Mahony I planned a day's
[An Encounter] [434] the morning on the Canal Bridge. Mahony's big sister was to write
[An Encounter] [463] Mahony's grey suit approaching. He came up the hill, smiling, and
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [502] with the spectacle of Dublin's commerce--the barges signalled
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [569] the happiest time of one's life was undoubtedly one's schoolboy
[An Encounter] [581] He said he had all Sir Walter Scott's works and all Lord Lytton's
[An Encounter] [583] said, "there were some of Lord Lytton's works which boys couldn't
[An Encounter] [629] "I say! Look what he's doing!"
[An Encounter] [634] "I say... He's a queer old josser!"
[Araby] [711] the late tenant's rusty bicycle-pump. He had been a very charitable
[Araby] [729] housed. Or if Mangan's sister came out on the doorstep to call her
[Araby] [733] Mangan's steps resignedly. She was waiting for us, her figure
[Araby] [795] "It's well for you," she said.
[Araby] [808] class. I watched my master's face pass from amiability to
[Araby] [812] desire, seemed to me child's play, ugly monotonous child's play.
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Araby] [851] At nine o'clock I heard my uncle's latchkey in the halldoor. I heard
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Araby] [913] "0, there's a ... fib!"
[Eveline] [948] they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then
[Eveline] [998] sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1014] of buying Sunday's dinner. Then she had to rush out as quickly as
[Eveline] [1072] the last night of her mother's illness; she was again in the close
[Eveline] [1080] As she mused the pitiful vision of her mother's life laid its spell on
[Eveline] [1083] mother's voice saying constantly with foolish insistence:
[After the Race] [1193] face of a high wind. Besides Villona's humming would confuse
[After the Race] [1198] Jimmy's excitement. He had been seen by many of his friends that
[After the Race] [1218] of the concern. Jimmy had a respect for his father's shrewdness in
[After the Race] [1234] that evening in Segouin's hotel and, meanwhile, Jimmy and his
[After the Race] [1242] In Jimmy's house this dinner had been pronounced an occasion. A
[After the Race] [1262] Englishman's manner. A graceful image of his, he thought, and a
[After the Race] [1275] hot and Segouin's task grew harder each moment: there was even
[After the Race] [1281] strolled along Stephen's Green in a faint cloud of aromatic smoke.
[After the Race] [1290] "It's Farley!"
[After the Race] [1310] American's yacht. There was to be supper, music, cards. Villona
[After the Race] [1321] for form's sake. They drank, however: it was Bohemian. They
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1348] The cabin shook with the young men's cheering and the cards were
[Two Gallants] [1374] step on to the road, owing to his companion's rudeness, wore an
[Two Gallants] [1381] moment towards his companion's face. Once or twice he
[Two Gallants] [1418] spotted a fine tart under Waterhouse's clock and said good- night,
[Two Gallants] [1428] way. But she's up to the dodge."
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1441] Corley's stride acknowledged the compliment. The swing of his
[Two Gallants] [1444] of police and he had inherited his father's frame and gut. He
[Two Gallants] [1465] at some of the passing girls but Lenehan's gaze was fixed on the
[Two Gallants] [1478] "She's all right," said Corley. "I know the way to get around her,
[Two Gallants] [1479] man. She's a bit gone on me."
[Two Gallants] [1488] "There's nothing to touch a good slavey," he affirmed. "Take my
[Two Gallants] [1502] "I know that game," he said, "and it's a mug's game."
[Two Gallants] [1518] "She's on the turf now. I saw her driving down Earl Street one
[Two Gallants] [1521] "I suppose that's your doing," said Lenehan.
[Two Gallants] [1551] off all right? You know it's a ticklish job. They're damn close on
[Two Gallants] [1554] His bright, small eyes searched his companion's face for
[Two Gallants] [1560] Lenehan said no more. He did not wish to ruffle his friend's
[Two Gallants] [1562] wanted. A little tact was necessary. But Corley's brow was soon
[Two Gallants] [1565] "She's a fine decent tart," he said, with appreciation; "that's what
[Two Gallants] [1575] master's hands. One hand played in the bass the melody of Silent,
[Two Gallants] [1580] mournful music following them. When they reached Stephen's
[Two Gallants] [1590] "Let's have a look at her, Corley," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1630] young woman's appearance. She had her Sunday finery on. Her
[Two Gallants] [1637] her bosom stems upwards. Lenehan's eyes noted approvingly her
[Two Gallants] [1651] watched Corley's head which turned at every moment towards the
[Two Gallants] [1652] young woman's face like a big ball revolving on a pivot. He kept
[Two Gallants] [1658] forsake him and, as he came by the railings of the Duke's Lawn, he
[Two Gallants] [1664] He walked listlessly round Stephen's Green and then down Grafton
[Two Gallants] [1701] a subdued voice. The girl brought him a plate of grocer's hot peas,
[Two Gallants] [1705] ginger beer and sat for some time thinking of Corley's adventure.
[Two Gallants] [1707] dark road; he heard Corley's voice in deep energetic gallantries and
[Two Gallants] [1708] saw again the leer of the young woman's mouth. This vision made
[Two Gallants] [1726] Street. At the corner of George's Street he met two friends of his
[Two Gallants] [1734] before in Egan's. The young man who had seen Mac in
[Two Gallants] [1737] stood them drinks in Egan's.
[Two Gallants] [1739] He left his friends at a quarter to ten and went up George's Street.
[Two Gallants] [1755] friend's situation as well as those of his own. But the memory of
[Two Gallants] [1756] Corley's slowly revolving head calmed him somewhat: he was sure
[Two Gallants] [1785] swiftly towards Stephen's Green.
[The Boarding House] [1821] MRS. MOONEY was a butcher's daughter. She was a woman who
[The Boarding House] [1823] had married her father's foreman and opened a butcher's shop near
[The Boarding House] [1830] had to sleep a neighbour's house.
[The Boarding House] [1835] enlist himself as a sheriff's man. He was a shabby stooped little
[The Boarding House] [1838] day long he sat in the bailiff's room, waiting to be put on a job.
[The Boarding House] [1850] Mrs. Mooney's young men paid fifteen shillings a week for board
[The Boarding House] [1854] chances of favourites and outsiders. Jack Mooney, the Madam's
[The Boarding House] [1862] Mooney's front drawing-room. The music-hall artistes would
[The Boarding House] [1864] accompaniments. Polly Mooney, the Madam's daughter, would
[The Boarding House] [1876] corn-factor's office but, as a disreputable sheriff's man used to
[The Boarding House] [1890] Polly knew that she was being watched, but still her mother's
[The Boarding House] [1903] the street beneath the raised sashes. The belfry of George's Church
[The Boarding House] [1913] Tuesday's bread- pudding. When the table was cleared, the broken
[The Boarding House] [1924] mother's tolerance.
[The Boarding House] [1928] that the bells of George's Church had stopped ringing. It was
[The Boarding House] [1938] world. He had simply taken advantage of Polly's youth and
[The Boarding House] [1948] daughter's honour: marriage.
[The Boarding House] [1950] She counted all her cards again before sending Mary up to Doran's
[The Boarding House] [1958] Catholic wine-merchant's office and publicity would mean for
[The Boarding House] [1981] else's business. He felt his heart leap warmly in his throat as he
[The Boarding House] [1990] Reynolds's Newspaper every week but he attended to his religious
[The Boarding House] [1994] father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a
[The Boarding House] [2061] lover's eyes rested for a second or two on a thick bulldog face and
[The Boarding House] [2068] Polly. The reunion had been almost broken up on account of Jack's
[A Little Cloud] [2109] remain unspoiled by such success. Gallaher's heart was in the right
[A Little Cloud] [2113] Little Chandler's thoughts ever since lunch-time had been of his
[A Little Cloud] [2114] meeting with Gallaher, of Gallaher's invitation and of the great city
[A Little Cloud] [2124] As he sat at his desk in the King's Inns he thought what changes
[A Little Cloud] [2149] feudal arch of the King's Inns, a neat modest figure, and walked
[A Little Cloud] [2160] He had never been in Corless's but he knew the value of the name.
[A Little Cloud] [2191] of Ignatius Gallaher's sayings when he was in a tight corner:
[A Little Cloud] [2193] "Half time now, boys," he used to say light-heartedly. "Where's my
[A Little Cloud] [2222] was a poet's soul. Melancholy was the dominant note of his
[A Little Cloud] [2235] mother's name before the surname: Thomas Malone Chandler, or
[A Little Cloud] [2240] to turn back. As he came near Corless's his former agitation began
[A Little Cloud] [2282] "You don't know what's good for you, my boy," said Ignatius
[A Little Cloud] [2286] odd half-one or so when I meet any of the old crowd: that's all."
[A Little Cloud] [2288] "Ah well," said Ignatius Gallaher, cheerfully, "here's to us and to
[A Little Cloud] [2294] seems to be in a bad way. What's he doing?"
[A Little Cloud] [2296] "Nothing, said Little Chandler. "He's gone to the dogs."
[A Little Cloud] [2300] "Yes; he's in the Land Commission."
[A Little Cloud] [2332] the flavour of his drink. "It's not so beautiful, you know. Of course,
[A Little Cloud] [2333] it is beautiful.... But it's the life of Paris; that's the thing. Ah, there's
[A Little Cloud] [2337] succeeded in catching the barman's eye. He ordered the same
[A Little Cloud] [2346] glasses: then he touched his friend's glass lightly and reciprocated
[A Little Cloud] [2348] Gallaher's accent and way of expressing himself did not please
[A Little Cloud] [2370] bits in Paris. Go to one of the students' balls, for instance. That's
[A Little Cloud] [2378] "Ah," he said, "you may say what you like. There's no woman like
[A Little Cloud] [2384] "London!" said Ignatius Gallaher. "It's six of one and half-a-dozen
[A Little Cloud] [2403] "it's a rum world. Talk of immorality! I've heard of cases--what
[A Little Cloud] [2407] calm historian's tone, he proceeded to sketch for his friend some
[A Little Cloud] [2424] Well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "it's a relaxation to come over here,
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2426] You can't help having a certain feeling for it. That's human
[A Little Cloud] [2434] "I hope it's not too late in the day to offer my best wishes," said
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2480] I may take a little skip over here now that I've broken the ice. It's
[A Little Cloud] [2484] must have an evening together. That's agreed now, isn't it?"
[A Little Cloud] [2486] "Yes, that's agreed," said Ignatius Gallaher. "Next year if I come,
[A Little Cloud] [2499] as a deoc an doruis--that's good vernacular for a small whisky, I
[A Little Cloud] [2505] Three small whiskies had gone to his head and Gallaher's strong
[A Little Cloud] [2508] finding himself with Gallaher in Corless's surrounded by lights and
[A Little Cloud] [2509] noise, of listening to Gallaher's stories and of sharing for a brief
[A Little Cloud] [2510] space Gallaher's vagrant and triumphant life, upset the equipoise of
[A Little Cloud] [2512] life and his friend's and it seemed to him unjust. Gallaher was his
[A Little Cloud] [2518] manhood. He saw behind Gallaher's refusal of his invitation.
[A Little Cloud] [2549] cheek, he did not flinch from his friend's gaze. Ignatius Gallaher
[A Little Cloud] [2578] arms. To save money they kept no servant but Annie's young sister
[A Little Cloud] [2583] coffee from Bewley's. Of course she was in a bad humour and gave
[A Little Cloud] [2594] crumpled horn. It was Annie's photograph. Little Chandler looked
[A Little Cloud] [2634] A volume of Byron's poems lay before him on the table. He opened
[A Little Cloud] [2642] Whilst I return to view my Margaret's tomb
[A Little Cloud] [2664] and suddenly bending to the child's face he shouted:
[A Little Cloud] [2682] The child, hearing its mother's voice, broke out into a paroxysm of
[A Little Cloud] [2685] "It's nothing, Annie ... it's nothing.... He began to cry..."
[A Little Cloud] [2695] "It's nothing.... He ... he began to cry.... I couldn't ... I didn't do
[A Little Cloud] [2702] There now, love! There now!... Lambabaun! Mamma's little lamb
[A Little Cloud] [2707] child's sobbing grew less and less; and tears of remorse started to
[Counterparts] [2736] The man entered Mr. Alleyne's room. Simultaneously Mr. Alleyne,
[Counterparts] [2770] that he must have a good night's drinking. The middle of the month
[Counterparts] [2775] he had been unaware of the man's presence till that moment, he
[Counterparts] [2800] "It's all right, Mr. Shelley," said the man, pointing with his finger
[Counterparts] [2805] man pulled a shepherd's plaid cap out of his pocket, put it on his
[Counterparts] [2809] the dark snug of O'Neill's shop, and filling up the little window
[Counterparts] [2825] Delacour had come while he was out in O'Neill's. He crammed his
[Counterparts] [2851] The moist pungent perfume lay all the way up to Mr. Alleyne's
[Counterparts] [2862] correspondence and then flicked it towards him as if to say: "That's
[Counterparts] [2906] The man glanced from the lady's face to the little egg-shaped head
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2916] rose and his mouth twitched with a dwarf s passion. He shook his
[Counterparts] [2917] fist in the man's face till it seemed to vibrate like the knob of some
[Counterparts] [2935] what a hornet's nest the office would be for him. He could
[Counterparts] [2939] with everyone else. Mr. Alleyne would never give him an hour's
[Counterparts] [2951] could he touch Pat in O'Neill's. He could not touch him for more
[Counterparts] [2955] as he was fingering his watch-chain, he thought of Terry Kelly's
[Counterparts] [2961] going to have a good night of it. The clerk in Terry Kelly's said A
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [2979] Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's
[Counterparts] [2985] made to the chief clerk when he was in Callan's of Fownes's Street;
[Counterparts] [2988] Farrington's retort. At this Farrington told the boys to polish off
[Counterparts] [2996] which Mr. Alleyne shook his fist in Farrington's face. Then he
[Counterparts] [3023] he was a married man; and Farrington's heavy dirty eyes leered at
[Counterparts] [3026] and promised to meet them later on at Mulligan's in Poolbeg
[Counterparts] [3029] When the Scotch House closed they went round to Mulligan's.
[Counterparts] [3033] Weathers came back. Much to Farrington's relief he drank a glass
[Counterparts] [3038] the Tivoli. Farrington's eyes wandered at every moment in the
[Counterparts] [3064] Leonard said "Go!" each was to try to bring down the other's hand
[Counterparts] [3068] opponent's hand slowly down on to the table. Farrington's dark
[Counterparts] [3075] "Who's not playing fair?" said the other.
[Counterparts] [3079] The trial began again. The veins stood out on Farrington's
[Counterparts] [3082] long struggle Weathers again brought his opponent's hand slowly
[Counterparts] [3087] "Ah! that's the knack!"
[Counterparts] [3093] Farrington's face. "Pony up, boys. We'll have just one little smahan
[Counterparts] [3133] "Where's your mother?"
[Counterparts] [3135] "She's out at the chapel."
[Counterparts] [3137] "That's right.... Did she think of leaving any dinner for me?"
[Counterparts] [3145] lit the lamp. He began to mimic his son's flat accent, saying half to
[Counterparts] [3149] "What's for my dinner?"
[Clay] [3182] THE matron had given her leave to go out as soon as the women's
[Clay] [3220] have felt herself in the way (though Joe's wife was ever so nice
[Clay] [3239] women's room and began to pull the big bell. In a few minutes the
[Clay] [3253] and proposed Maria's health while all the other women clattered
[Clay] [3286] among the crowds. She went into Downes's cake-shop but the shop
[Clay] [3293] decided to buy some plumcake but Downes's plumcake had not
[Clay] [3322] Everybody said: "0, here's Maria!" when she came to Joe's house.
[Clay] [3334] look for her plumcake. She tried in Downes's bag and then in the
[Clay] [3399] After that Mrs. Donnelly played Miss McCloud's Reel for the
[Clay] [3411] children be quiet and listen to Maria's song. Then she played the
[A Painful Case] [3457] of Hauptmann's Michael Kramer, the stage directions of which
[A Painful Case] [3484] midday he went to Dan Burke's and took his lunch--a bottle of
[A Painful Case] [3486] he was set free. He dined in an eating-house in George's Street
[A Painful Case] [3487] where he felt himself safe from the society o Dublin's gilded youth
[A Painful Case] [3489] evenings were spent either before his landlady's piano or roaming
[A Painful Case] [3490] about the outskirts of the city. His liking for Mozart's music
[A Painful Case] [3497] they died. He performed these two social duties for old dignity's
[A Painful Case] [3508] "What a pity there is such a poor house tonight! It's so hard on
[A Painful Case] [3526] Terrace and seized the moments when her daughter's attention was
[A Painful Case] [3529] warning. Her name was Mrs. Sinico. Her husband's
[A Painful Case] [3540] encouraged his visits, thinking that his daughter's hand was in
[A Painful Case] [3545] enjoying the lady's society. Neither he nor she had had any such
[A Painful Case] [3559] workmen's discussions, he said, were too timorous; the interest
[A Painful Case] [3584] recognised as his own, insisting on the soul's incurable loneliness.
[A Painful Case] [3617] having dined moderately in George's Street and read the evening
[A Painful Case] [3660] the guard's whistle he set the train in motion and a second or two
[A Painful Case] [3685] heart's action.
[A Painful Case] [3730] miserable and malodorous. His soul's companion! He thought of
[A Painful Case] [3751] value of a gentleman's estate in County Kildare They drank at
[A Painful Case] [3788] had been outcast from life's feast. One human being had seemed to
[A Painful Case] [3792] wished him gone. No one wanted him; he was outcast from life's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3815] light. It was an old man's face, very bony and hairy. The moist blue
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3821] "That's better now, Mr. O'Connor."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3827] tobacco again meditatively and after a moment's thought decided
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3854] Mr. O'Connor had been engaged by Tierney's agent to canvass one
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3867] "Ah, yes," he said, continuing, "it's hard to know what way to bring
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3879] "That's what ruins children," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3883] I've a sup taken. What's the world coming to when sons speaks that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3894] But, sure, it's worse whenever he gets a job; he drinks it all."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3900] "Hello! Is this a Freemason's meeting?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3902] "Who's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3967] halfpence. But it's labour produces everything. The workingman is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3972] "How's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3995] "That's true," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4032] mentioned Father Burke's name. I think it'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4042] "It's no go," said Mr. Henchy, shaking his head. "I asked the little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4050] "0, he's as tricky as they make 'em," said Mr. Henchy. "He hasn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4055] hand-me-down shop in Mary's Lane."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4061] to buy a waistcoat or a trousers--moya! But Tricky Dicky's little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4063] you mind now? That's that. That's where he first saw the light."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4093] cigarette into the fire, "he's hard up, like the rest of us."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4099] man from the other camp. He's a spy of Colgan's, if you ask me.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4118] He's a clever chap, too, with the pen. Do you remember that thing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4126] "There's no knowing," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4130] above that.... But there's a certain little nobleman with a cock-eye
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4135] "There's a lineal descendant of Major Sirr for you if you like! O,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4136] the heart's blood of a patriot! That's a fellow now that'd sell his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4146] body and it was impossible to say whether he wore a clergyman's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4147] collar or a layman's, because the collar of his shabby frock-coat,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4168] "He's round at the Black Eagle," said Mr. Henchy. "But won't you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4201] Kavanagh's together. Is he a priest at all?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4204] We haven't many of them, thank God! but we have a few.... He's an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4209] "That's another mystery."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4213] "No," said Mr. Henchy, "I think he's travelling on his own
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4234] "There's some deal on in that quarter," said Mr. O'Connor
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4267] sending out for a pound of chops for his dinner? How's that for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4294] "Here, boy!" said Mr. Henchy, "will you run over to O'Farrell's and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4301] "Ah, well, he's not so bad after all. He's as good as his word,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4304] "There's no tumblers," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4306] "O, don't let that trouble you, Jack," said Mr. Henchy. "Many's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4309] "Anyway, it's better than nothing," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4311] "He's not a bad sort," said Mr. Henchy, "only Fanning has such a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4330] "Here's my best respects, sir, to Mr. Henchy," drank the contents,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4335] "That's the way it begins," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4341] placed his bottle on the mantelpiece within hand's reach and drew
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4344] "Well, I did a good day's work today," said Mr. Henchy, after a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4350] and myself. Between ourselves, you know, Crofton (he's a decent
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4351] chap, of course), but he's not worth a damn as a canvasser. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4357] his sloping figure. He had a big face which resembled a young ox's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4380] "How can I?" said the old man, "when there's no corkscrew? "
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4416] 'He's a respectable man,' said I. 'He's in favour of whatever will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4417] benefit this country. He's a big ratepayer,' I said. 'He has extensive
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4419] to his own advantage to keep down the rates? He's a prominent and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4421] belong to any party, good, bad, or indifferent.' That's the way to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4433] factories. It's capital we want."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4438] "Parnell," said Mr. Henchy, "is dead. Now, here's the way I look at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4439] it. Here's this chap come to the throne after his old mother keeping
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4441] means well by us. He's a jolly fine decent fellow, if you ask me,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4450] Edward's life, you know, is not the very..."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4453] personally. He's just an ordinary knockabout like you and me. He's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4454] fond of his glass of grog and he's a bit of a rake, perhaps, and he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4457] "That's all very fine," said Mr. Lyons. "But look at the case of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4460] "In the name of God," said Mr. Henchy, "where's the analogy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4468] "This is Parnell's anniversary," said Mr. O'Connor, "and don't let us
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4469] stir up any bad blood. We all respect him now that he's dead and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4472] Pok! The tardy cork flew out of Mr. Crofton's bottle. Mr. Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4480] Lie down, ye curs!' That's the way he treated them. Come in, Joe!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4501] "There's one of them, anyhow," said Mr. Henchy, "that didn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4516] "O, that thing is it.... Sure, that's old now."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4541] And Erin's hopes and Erin's dreams
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4542] Perish upon her monarch's pyre.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4566] With Erin's heroes of the past.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4575] The day that brings us Freedom's reign.
[A Mother] [4645] determined to take advantage of her daughter's name and brought
[A Mother] [4656] often on people's lips. People said that she was very clever at
[A Mother] [4674] Meade's comic turn. To keep the audience continually diverted she
[A Mother] [4687] blush-pink charmeuse in Brown Thomas's to let into the front of
[A Mother] [4688] Kathleen's dress. It cost a pretty penny; but there are occasions
[A Mother] [4742] the look of things and Mr. Fitzpatrick's vacant smile irritated her
[A Mother] [4773] would bring the matter before the committee. Mrs. Kearney's anger
[A Mother] [4800] her daughter's clothes and music in charge of her husband and
[A Mother] [4830] Queen's Theatre. He sang his music with great feeling and volume
[A Mother] [4835] never drank anything stronger than milk for his voice's sake. Mr.
[A Mother] [4894] yourself bring her the contract? Anyway, if it's not your business
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4951] stroking his beard, while Mrs. Kearney spoke into Kathleen's ear
[A Mother] [4955] Mr. Bell's nerves were greatly agitated because he was afraid the
[A Mother] [4992] counted out four into Mrs. Kearney's hand and said she would get
[A Mother] [5003] Glynn's item. The poor lady sang Killarney in a bodiless gasping
[A Mother] [5019] ever witnessed. Miss Kathleen Kearney's musical career was ended
[A Mother] [5021] think of Mrs. Kearney's conduct. He did not like to say anything.
[A Mother] [5046] great friend of Kathleen's and the Kearneys had often invited her to
[A Mother] [5077] "You must speak to the secretary. It's not my business. I'm a great
[A Mother] [5083] After that Mrs. Kearney's conduct was condemned on all hands:
[A Mother] [5092] notes of the song struck her ear, she caught up her daughter's cloak
[A Mother] [5099] she stopped and glared into Mr. Holohan's face.
[A Mother] [5109] "That's a nice lady!" he said. "O, she's a nice lady!"
[Grace] [5140] "Give him air. He's fainted."
[Grace] [5143] dark medal of blood had formed itself near the man's head on the
[Grace] [5145] man's face, sent for a policeman.
[Grace] [5164] "Who is the man? What's his name and address?"
[Grace] [5169] man washed the blood from the injured man's mouth and then
[Grace] [5172] brandy was forced down the man's throat. In a few seconds he
[Grace] [5178] "Sha,'s nothing," said the injured man, trying to stand up.
[Grace] [5182] hat was placed on the man's head. The constable asked:
[Grace] [5197] "Hallo, Tom, old man! What's the trouble?"
[Grace] [5199] "Sha,'s nothing," said the man.
[Grace] [5204] "It's all right, constable. I'll see him home."
[Grace] [5263] Kernan's mouth but he could not see. He struck a match and,
[Grace] [5271] "That's ugly," said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5273] "Sha, 's nothing," said Mr. Kernan, closing his mouth and pulling
[Grace] [5294] intersected the arc of his friend's decline, but Mr. Kernan's decline
[Grace] [5305] their mother's absence, began some horseplay with him. He was
[Grace] [5310] "Such a sight! O, he'll do for himself one day and that's the holy
[Grace] [5311] alls of it. He's been drinking since Friday."
[Grace] [5315] Mrs. Kernan, remembering Mr. Power's good offices during
[Grace] [5328] offer you. But if you wait a minute I'll send round to Fogarty's, at
[Grace] [5337] a new leaf. I'll talk to Martin. He's the man. We'll come here one of
[Grace] [5343] "It's very kind of you to bring him home," she said.
[Grace] [5357] Mrs. Kernan's puzzled eyes watched the car till it was out of sight.
[Grace] [5359] husband's pockets.
[Grace] [5363] with her husband by waltzing with him to Mr. Power's
[Grace] [5371] his other arm. After three weeks she had found a wife's life
[Grace] [5376] sons were launched. One was in a draper's shop in Glasgow and
[Grace] [5392] odour, and gave them chairs at the fire. Mr. Kernan's tongue, the
[Grace] [5398] proudly, with a veteran's pride.
[Grace] [5403] Power's, but its development was entrusted to Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5422] his face was like Shakespeare's.
[Grace] [5430] man of her husband's age would not change greatly before death.
[Grace] [5433] told the gentlemen that Mr. Kernan's tongue would not suffer by
[Grace] [5460] for The Freeman's Journal, a town traveller for a coal firm on
[Grace] [5464] Kernan's case.
[Grace] [5466] "Pain? Not much," answered Mr. Kernan. "But it's so sickening. I
[Grace] [5469] "That's the boose," said Mr. Cunningham firmly.
[Grace] [5471] "No," said Mr. Kernan. "I think I caught cold on the car. There's
[Grace] [5478] "Yes, yes," said Mr. M'Coy, "that's the thorax."
[Grace] [5484] "Ah, well, all's well that ends well."
[Grace] [5494] "A chap. I don't know his name. Damn it now, what's his name?
[Grace] [5526] Mr. Harford's manners in drinking were silent. Mr. Power said
[Grace] [5529] "All's well that ends well."
[Grace] [5601] "It's like everything else in this world," he said. "You get some bad
[Grace] [5607] "It's better to have nothing to say to them," said Mr. M'Coy. "That's
[Grace] [5617] exchanged a nod with Mr. Cunningham behind Mr. Power's back,
[Grace] [5641] "We can meet in M'Auley's," said Mr. M'Coy. "That'll be the most
[Grace] [5651] "Half-seven at M'Auley's be it!"
[Grace] [5656] "What's in the wind?"
[Grace] [5658] "O, it's nothing," said Mr. Cunningham. "It's only a little matter
[Grace] [5663] "No, no," said Mr. Cunningham in an evasive tone, "it's just a
[Grace] [5672] "Yes, that's it," said Mr. Cunningham, "Jack and I and M'Coy here
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5716] "It's a curious thing," said Mr. Cunningham, "about the Jesuit
[Grace] [5723] "That's a fact," said Mr. Cunningham. "That's history."
[Grace] [5732] "Yes," said Mr. Kernan. "That's why I have a feeling for them. It's
[Grace] [5749] The gentlemen drank again, one following another's example. Mr.
[Grace] [5754] "O, it's just a retreat, you know," said Mr. Cunningham. "Father
[Grace] [5755] Purdon is giving it. It's for business men, you know."
[Grace] [5762] "Fine, jolly fellow! He's a man of the world like ourselves."
[Grace] [5766] "That's the man."
[Grace] [5770] "Munno.... It's not exactly a sermon, you know. It's just kind of a
[Grace] [5805] "But he's an Orangeman, Crofton, isn't he?" said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5808] Orangeman too. We went into Butler's in Moore Street--faith, was
[Grace] [5809] genuinely moved, tell you the God's truth--and I remember well
[Grace] [5813] "There's a good deal in that," said Mr. Power. "There used always
[Grace] [5817] "There's not much difference between us," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5833] "Here's a visitor for you!"
[Grace] [5882] Lux. And Pius IX his predecessor's motto was Crux upon Crux--
[Grace] [5899] "That's no joke, I can tell you."
[Grace] [5902] M'Coy's example, "when we went to the penny-a-week school."
[Grace] [5916] Leo's poems was on the invention of the photograph--in Latin, of
[Grace] [5964] "What's that you were saying, Tom?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5983] "Dowling was no German, and that's a sure five," said Mr. Power,
[Grace] [6015] Mr. Cunningham's words had built up the vast image of the church
[Grace] [6031] "It was at the unveiling of Sir John Gray's statue. Edmund Dwyer
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6063] Mr. Kernan's expression changed.
[Grace] [6104] "There's a nice Catholic for you!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6106] "No candles!" repeated Mr. Kernan obdurately. "That's off!"
[Grace] [6134] stimulus. In a whisper, Mr. Cunningham drew Mr. Kernan's
[Grace] [6139] Michael Grimes, the owner of three pawnbroker's shops, and Dan
[Grace] [6140] Hogan's nephew, who was up for the job in the Town Clerk's
[Grace] [6142] Freeman's Journal, and poor O'Carroll, an old friend of Mr.
[Grace] [6143] Kernan's, who had been at one time a considerable commercial
[Grace] [6154] followed the general example. The priest's figure now stood
[Grace] [6211] wrong. But, with God's grace, I will rectify this and this. I will set
[The Dead] [6216] LILY, the caretaker's daughter, was literally run off her feet.
[The Dead] [6228] It was always a great affair, the Misses Morkan's annual dance.
[The Dead] [6230] friends of the family, the members of Julia's choir, any of Kate's
[The Dead] [6231] pupils that were grown up enough, and even some of Mary Jane's
[The Dead] [6236] to live with them in the dark, gaunt house on Usher's Island, the
[The Dead] [6246] leading soprano in Adam and Eve's, and Kate, being too feeble to
[The Dead] [6248] piano in the back room. Lily, the caretaker's daughter, did
[The Dead] [6249] housemaid's work for them. Though their life was modest, they
[The Dead] [6260] worlds that any of Mary Jane's pupils should see him under the
[The Dead] [6277] "Miss Kate, here's Mrs. Conroy."
[The Dead] [6280] them kissed Gabriel's wife, said she must be perished alive, and
[The Dead] [6341] "O Lily," he said, thrusting it into her hands, "it's Christmastime,
[The Dead] [6342] isn't it? Just... here's a little...."
[The Dead] [6358] shuffling of feet. He was still discomposed by the girl's bitter and
[The Dead] [6366] clacking of the men's heels and the shuffling of their soles
[The Dead] [6383] than her sister's, was all puckers and creases, like a shrivelled red
[The Dead] [6410] "Don't mind him, Aunt Kate," she said. "He's really an awful
[The Dead] [6411] bother, what with green shades for Tom's eyes at night and making
[The Dead] [6419] Gabriel's solicitude was a standing joke with them.
[The Dead] [6421] "Goloshes!" said Mrs. Conroy. "That's the latest. Whenever it's wet
[The Dead] [6428] joke. The smile soon faded from Aunt Julia's face and her
[The Dead] [6429] mirthless eyes were directed towards her nephew's face. After a
[The Dead] [6446] "It's nothing very wonderful, but Gretta thinks it very funny
[The Dead] [6462] girl like that, one you can depend on! There's that Lily, I'm sure I
[The Dead] [6463] don't know what has come over her lately. She's not the girl she
[The Dead] [6476] "Here's Freddy."
[The Dead] [6483] "Slip down, Gabriel, like a good fellow and see if he's all right, and
[The Dead] [6484] don't let him up if he's screwed. I'm sure he's screwed. I'm sure he
[The Dead] [6491] "It's such a relief," said Aunt Kate to Mrs. Conroy, "that Gabriel is
[The Dead] [6492] here. I always feel easier in my mind when he's here.... Julia,
[The Dead] [6493] there's Miss Daly and Miss Power will take some refreshment.
[The Dead] [6501] "Julia," said Aunt Kate summarily, "and here's Mr. Browne and
[The Dead] [6527] "God help me," he said, smiling, "it's the doctor's orders."
[The Dead] [6547] who was one of Mary Jane's pupils, asked Miss Daly what was the
[The Dead] [6561] "O, here's Mr. Bergin and Mr. Kerrigan," said Mary Jane. "Mr.
[The Dead] [6591] "It's only Freddy, Kate, and Gabriel with him."
[The Dead] [6595] was of Gabriel's size and build, with very round shoulders. His face
[The Dead] [6613] "He's not so bad, is he?" said Aunt Kate to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6615] Gabriel's brows were dark but he raised them quickly and
[The Dead] [6621] made him take the pledge on New Year's Eve. But come on,
[The Dead] [6659] Gabriel's eyes, irritated by the floor, which glittered with beeswax
[The Dead] [6726] A look of perplexity appeared on Gabriel's face. It was true that he
[The Dead] [6734] Hickey's on Bachelor's Walk, to Web's or Massey's on Aston's
[The Dead] [6735] Quay, or to O'Clohissey's in the bystreet. He did not know how to
[The Dead] [6751] her his review of Browning's poems. That was how she had found
[The Dead] [6759] splendid for Gretta too if she'd come. She's from Connacht, isn't
[The Dead] [6782] "Well," said Gabriel, "it's partly to keep in touch with the
[The Dead] [6827] like her son's and she stuttered slightly. She had been told that
[The Dead] [6841] him with her rabbit's eyes.
[The Dead] [6851] "She's sending in the younger ones first as soon as this waltz is
[The Dead] [6861] "Something like that. I'm trying to get that Mr. D'Arcy to sing. He's
[The Dead] [6876] "There's a nice husband for you, Mrs. Malins."
[The Dead] [6893] and were conversing quietly in little groups. Gabriel's warm
[The Dead] [6927] of an old song of Aunt Julia's--Arrayed for the Bridal. Her voice,
[The Dead] [6931] looking at the singer's face, was to feel and share the excitement of
[The Dead] [6935] colour struggled into Aunt Julia's face as she bent to replace in the
[The Dead] [6948] Now! Would you believe that now? That's the truth. Upon my
[The Dead] [6949] word and honour that's the truth. I never heard your voice sound so
[The Dead] [6965] long as I am coming here. And that's the honest truth."
[The Dead] [6991] "I know all about the honour of God, Mary Jane, but I think it's not
[The Dead] [6995] good of the Church if the pope does it. But it's not just, Mary Jane,
[The Dead] [6996] and it's not right."
[The Dead] [7009] "O, I don't question the pope's being right. I'm only a stupid old
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7012] were in Julia's place I'd tell that Father Healey straight up to his
[The Dead] [7045] "O, it's only two steps up the quay."
[The Dead] [7072] "Where is Gabriel?" she cried. "Where on earth is Gabriel? There's
[The Dead] [7119] Jane's idea and she had also suggested apple sauce for the goose
[The Dead] [7133] the table, walking on each other's heels, getting in each other's way
[The Dead] [7153] which the table covered Lily's removal of the plates. The subject of
[The Dead] [7174] sharply. "Is it because he's only a black?"
[The Dead] [7216] was ever put into a man's throat."
[The Dead] [7221] hearing of old Parkinson but he's too far back for me."
[The Dead] [7227] table. The clatter of forks and spoons began again. Gabriel's wife
[The Dead] [7231] blancmange and jam. The pudding was of Aunt Julia's making and
[The Dead] [7242] thing for the blood and he was just then under doctor's care. Mrs.
[The Dead] [7264] "That's the rule of the order," said Aunt Kate firmly.
[The Dead] [7351] Gabriel's mind that Miss Ivors was not there and that she had gone
[The Dead] [7418] Aunt Julia's face and the tears which had risen to Aunt Kate's eyes,
[The Dead] [7498] "She's getting on her things, Gabriel," said Aunt Kate.
[The Dead] [7500] "Who's playing up there?" asked Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7537] gentleman's mill, walking round and round in order to drive the
[The Dead] [7550] Everyone laughed, even Mrs. Malins, at Gabriel's manner and Aunt
[The Dead] [7558] Johnny came in sight of King Billy's statue: and whether he fell in
[The Dead] [7571] The peal of laughter which followed Gabriel's imitation of the
[The Dead] [7601] shouted to the bewildered cabman above the din of everybody's
[The Dead] [7630] notes of a man's voice singing.
[The Dead] [7645] "Well, isn't Freddy terrible?" said Mary Jane. "He's really terrible."
[The Dead] [7652] his voice. The voice, made plaintive by distance and by the singer's
[The Dead] [7660] "O," exclaimed Mary Jane. "It's Bartell D'Arcy singing and he
[The Dead] [7676] "O, Mr. D'Arcy," cried Mary Jane, "it's downright mean of you to
[The Dead] [7694] "It's the weather," said Aunt Julia, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7725] "It's called The Lass of Aughrim," said Mr. D'Arcy, "but I couldn't
[The Dead] [7731] "It's a very nice air," said Mary Jane. "I'm sorry you were not in
[The Dead] [7771] but Gabriel's eyes were still bright with happiness. The blood went
[The Dead] [7844] spite of Mr. Bartell D'Arcy's protest, paid the driver. He gave the
[The Dead] [7908] that the words would not pass Gabriel's lips. No, it was not the
[The Dead] [7917] "No, tired: that's all."
[The Dead] [7931] "Well, poor fellow, he's a decent sort of chap, after all," continued
[The Dead] [7933] him, and I didn't expect it, really. It's a pity he wouldn't keep away
[The Dead] [7934] from that Browne, because he's not a bad fellow, really."
[The Dead] [8012] The smile passed away from Gabriel's face. A dull anger began to
[The Dead] [8034] A thought flew across Gabriel's mind.
[The Dead] [8097] when I was going to leave my grandmother's and come up here to
[The Dead] [8122] "Then the night before I left, I was in my grandmother's house in
[The Dead] [8172] From his aunt's supper, from his own foolish speech, from the wine
[The Dead] [8192] lover's eyes when he had told her that he did not wish to live.
[The Dead] [8194] Generous tears filled Gabriel's eyes. He had never felt like that