Dubliners by James Joyce
What

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 194 occurrences of the word:   what

[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [70] corner. That's what I'm always saying to that Rosicrucian there:
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [149] difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain
[The Sisters] [172] tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream. I
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [270] know what we'd done at all. It was him brought us all them flowers
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[An Encounter] [404] the day' ... Go on! What day? 'Hardly had the day dawned' ... Have
[An Encounter] [405] you studied it? What have you there in your pocket?"
[An Encounter] [411] "What is this rubbish?" he said. "The Apache Chief! Is this what
[An Encounter] [440] what would Father Butler be doing out at the Pigeon House. We
[An Encounter] [492] by saying what a funk he was and guessing how many he would
[An Encounter] [554] He was shabbily dressed in a suit of greenish-black and wore what
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [606] accent was good. He began to speak to us about girls, saying what
[An Encounter] [629] "I say! Look what he's doing!"
[An Encounter] [658] what he wanted was to get a nice warm whipping. I was surprised
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Araby] [799] What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping
[Eveline] [982] house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores
[Eveline] [1002] threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead
[Eveline] [1008] shillings--and Harry always sent up what he could but the trouble
[Eveline] [1100] maze of distress, she prayed to God to direct her, to show her what
[After the Race] [1207] heart the inheritor of solid instincts knew well with what difficulty
[After the Race] [1223] car in which he sat. How smoothly it ran. In what style they had
[After the Race] [1293] very well what the talk was about. Villona and Riviere were the
[After the Race] [1318] figures. What merriment! Jimmy took his part with a will; this was
[After the Race] [1326] speech. Farley clapped him on the back and laughed loudly. What
[After the Race] [1327] jovial fellows! What good company they were!
[After the Race] [1345] Segouin. What excitement! Jimmy was excited too; he would lose,
[After the Race] [1349] bundled together. They began then to gather in what they had won.
[Two Gallants] [1457] companions. His conversation was mainly about himself what he
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1459] and what he had said to settle the matter. When he reported these
[Two Gallants] [1481] "You're what I call a gay Lothario," said Lenehan. "And the proper
[Two Gallants] [1552] that point. Eh? ... What?"
[Two Gallants] [1565] "She's a fine decent tart," he said, with appreciation; "that's what
[Two Gallants] [1601] you what. I'll go over and talk to her and you can pass by."
[Two Gallants] [1715] enough with friends and with girls. He knew what those friends
[Two Gallants] [1729] what was the latest. He replied that he had spent the day with
[The Boarding House] [1839] Mrs. Mooney, who had taken what remained of her money out of
[The Boarding House] [1939] inexperience: that was evident. The question was: What reparation
[The Boarding House] [1977] loophole of reparation. The harm was done. What could he do now
[The Boarding House] [1998] But what would grammar matter if he really loved her? He could
[The Boarding House] [1999] not make up his mind whether to like her or despise her for what
[The Boarding House] [2010] "O Bob! Bob! What am I to do? What am I to do at all?"
[The Boarding House] [2030] dinner. He scarcely knew what he was eating feeling her beside
[The Boarding House] [2042] "What am I to do?" The instinct of the celibate warned him to hold
[The Boarding House] [2101] Then she remembered what she had been waiting for.
[A Little Cloud] [2124] As he sat at his desk in the King's Inns he thought what changes
[A Little Cloud] [2212] original? He was not sure what idea he wished to express but the
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2260] signs of aging in me--eh, what? A little grey and thin on the top--
[A Little Cloud] [2261] what?"
[A Little Cloud] [2372] You know what they are, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2378] "Ah," he said, "you may say what you like. There's no woman like
[A Little Cloud] [2391] "O, come on, another one won't do you any harm. What is it? The
[A Little Cloud] [2403] "it's a rum world. Talk of immorality! I've heard of cases--what
[A Little Cloud] [2516] chance. What was it that stood in his way? His unfortunate timidity
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2561] There are hundreds--what am I saying?--thousands of rich
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2619] them, no rapture. He thought of what Gallaher had said about rich
[A Little Cloud] [2680] "What is it? What is it?" she cried.
[A Little Cloud] [2689] "What have you done to him?" she cried, glaring into his face.
[A Little Cloud] [2696] anything.... What?"
[Counterparts] [2742] "Farrington? What is the meaning of this? Why have I always to
[Counterparts] [2749] "Mr. Shelley said, sir .... Kindly attend to what I say and not to
[Counterparts] [2750] what Mr. Shelley says, sir. You have always some excuse or
[Counterparts] [2843] sat down at his desk to get what was required, he realised how
[Counterparts] [2935] what a hornet's nest the office would be for him. He could
[Counterparts] [3016] had definite notions of what was what, asked the boys would they
[Counterparts] [3089] "What the hell do you know about it?" said Farrington fiercely,
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3141] "Light the lamp. What do you mean by having the place in
[Clay] [3201] compliment. And Ginger Mooney was always saying what she
[Clay] [3214] shillings clear after paying tram fare. What a nice evening they
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3290] what else would she buy: she wanted to buy something really nice.
[Clay] [3292] to know what to buy and all she could think of was cake. She
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3508] "What a pity there is such a poor house tonight! It's so hard on
[A Painful Case] [3518] began with a defiant note but was confused by what seemed a
[A Painful Case] [3566] She asked him why did he not write out his thoughts. For what, he
[A Painful Case] [3723] in some house on the Lucan road. What an end! The whole
[A Painful Case] [3725] he had ever spoken to her of what he held sacred. The threadbare
[A Painful Case] [3732] to be filled by the barman. Just God, what an end! Evidently she
[A Painful Case] [3765] himself what else could he have done. He could not have carried
[A Painful Case] [3767] her openly. He had done what seemed to him best. How was he to
[A Painful Case] [3801] pounding in his ears. He began to doubt the reality of what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3842] He selected one of the cards and read what was printed on it:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3867] "Ah, yes," he said, continuing, "it's hard to know what way to bring
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3869] the Christian Brothers and I done what I could him, and there he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3879] "That's what ruins children," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3886] "What age is he?" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3904] "What are you doing in the dark?" asked a voice.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3908] "Yes. What are you doing in the dark?" said Mr. Hynes. advancing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3946] "What other tinker?" said Mr. Hynes.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3975] Edward Rex if he comes here next year? What do we want
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4026] "He wouldn't promise. He said: 'I won't tell anyone what way I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4047] "What did I tell you, Mat?" said Mr. Hynes. "Tricky Dicky
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4089] "Tell me," he said across the fire, "what brings our friend in here?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4090] What does he want?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4108] understand a fellow being hard up, but what I can't understand is a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4196] "What he is exactly?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4241] I'm thinking seriously of becoming a City Father myself. What do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4261] live on the smell of an oil- rag.' And do you know what he told
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4264] "What?" said Mr. Henchy and Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4269] says he, 'coming into the Mansion House.' 'Wisha!' says I, 'what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4275] "What is it?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4286] "What bottles?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4325] "What age are you?" he asked.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4424] "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4427] "Listen to me," said Mr. Henchy. "What we want in thus country,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4463] "What I mean," said Mr. Lyons, "is we have our ideals. Why, now,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4593] "What do you think of that, Crofton?" cried Mr. Henchy. "Isn't that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4594] fine? What?"
[A Mother] [4671] Kearney helped him. She had tact. She knew what artistes should
[A Mother] [4672] go into capitals and what artistes should go into small type. She
[A Mother] [4728] asked him to tell her what it meant. Mr. Holohan did not know
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4841] people know what an ordeal a concert was to him. Therefore when
[A Mother] [5020] in Dublin after that, he said. The baritone was asked what did he
[A Mother] [5025] as to what should be done when the interval came.
[A Mother] [5042] the sake of the artistes. But what else could she do? She appealed
[A Mother] [5063] "And what way did you treat me?" asked Mrs. Kearney.
[A Mother] [5084] everyone approved of what the committee had done. She stood at
[Grace] [5156] The manager at once began to narrate what he knew. The costable,
[Grace] [5211] "No bones broken. What? Can you walk?"
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5563] "Is this what we pay rates for?" he asked. "To feed and clothe these
[Grace] [5597] people. I needn't tell you, Martin, what kind of men they are."
[Grace] [5691] "D'ye know what, Tom, has just occurred to me? You night join in
[Grace] [5789] say, he didn't preach what was quite orthodox."
[Grace] [5799] "Yes, in the back near the door. I forget now what.... O yes, it was
[Grace] [5989] "What?" cried Mr. Kernan. "Is it John of Tuam?"
[Grace] [6011] "And what about Dowling?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [6085] "What?" said Mr. Kernan. "Must I have a candle?"
[The Dead] [6263] what could be keeping Gabriel: and that was what brought them
[The Dead] [6321] "The men that is now is only all palaver and what they can get out
[The Dead] [6395] that last year, hadn't we? Don't you remember, Aunt Kate, what a
[The Dead] [6411] bother, what with green shades for Tom's eyes at night and making
[The Dead] [6414] never guess what he makes me wear now!"
[The Dead] [6432] "And what are goloshes, Gabriel?"
[The Dead] [6435] know what goloshes are? You wear them over your... over your
[The Dead] [6461] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate again. "What a comfort it is to have a
[The Dead] [6463] don't know what has come over her lately. She's not the girl she
[The Dead] [6547] who was one of Mary Jane's pupils, asked Miss Daly what was the
[The Dead] [6585] "What is the matter, Julia?" asked Aunt Kate anxiously. "Who is
[The Dead] [6607] Freddy Malins bade the Misses Morkan good-evening in what
[The Dead] [6710] "What is it?" asked Gabriel, smiling at her solemn manner.
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6880] Gabriel what beautiful places there were in Scotland and beautiful
[The Dead] [6886] Gabriel hardly heard what she said. Now that supper was coming
[The Dead] [6917] good: that was one for Miss Ivors. What did he care that his aunts
[The Dead] [6984] on Christmas morning! And all for what?"
[The Dead] [7107] "Miss Furlong, what shall I send you?" he asked. "A wing or a slice
[The Dead] [7112] "Miss Higgins, what for you?"
[The Dead] [7142] "Now, if anyone wants a little more of what vulgar people call
[The Dead] [7261] two in the morning and slept in their coffins. He asked what they
[The Dead] [7322] while I endeavour to express to you in words what my feelings are
[The Dead] [7390] spirit of camaraderie, and as the guests of--what shall I call them?
[The Dead] [7394] Julia vainly asked each of her neighbours in turn to tell her what
[The Dead] [7526] "Why, what was wonderful about Johnny?" asked Mr. Browne.
[The Dead] [7568] on, sir! What do you mean, sir? Johnny! Johnny! Most
[The Dead] [7635] He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the
[The Dead] [7670] "O, what a pity!" she cried. "Is he coming down, Gretta?"
[The Dead] [7722] "Mr. D'Arcy," she said, "what is the name of that song you were
[The Dead] [7879] set his unstable candle down on a toilet-table and asked at what
[The Dead] [7925] "What is it?"
[The Dead] [7929] "Yes. What about him?"
[The Dead] [7975] "Gretta, dear, what are you thinking about?"
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [7996] "What about the song? Why does that make you cry?"
[The Dead] [8041] "What for?"
[The Dead] [8054] "What was he?" asked Gabriel, still ironically.
[The Dead] [8082] "And what did he die of so young, Gretta? Consumption, was it?"
[The Dead] [8161] her hair: and, as he thought of what she must have been then, in
[The Dead] [8171] riot of emotions of an hour before. From what had it proceeded?