Dubliners by James Joyce
a

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 1583 occurrences of the word:   A

[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [61] say to a man like that."
[The Sisters] [66] let a young lad run about and play with young lads of his own age
[The Sisters] [71] take exercise. Why, when I was a nipper every morning of my life
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [73] now. Education is all very fine and large.... Mr. Cotter might take a
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [108] ordinary days a notice used to hang in the window, saying:
[The Sisters] [110] were up. A crape bouquet was tied to the doorknocker with ribbon.
[The Sisters] [111] Two poor women and a telegram boy were reading the card pinned
[The Sisters] [123] great-coat. Perhaps my aunt would have given me a packet of High
[The Sisters] [132] blackened, as it always was, with the snuff-stains of a week, with
[The Sisters] [139] went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a
[The Sisters] [140] mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a
[The Sisters] [143] before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish
[The Sisters] [161] answer or only a very foolish and halting one upon which he used
[The Sisters] [167] discoloured teeth and let his tongue lie upon his lower lip--a habit
[The Sisters] [173] remembered that I had noticed long velvet curtains and a swinging
[The Sisters] [180] that looked to the west reflected the tawny gold of a great bank of
[The Sisters] [203] as for the altar, his large hands loosely retaining a chalice. His face
[The Sisters] [205] nostrils and circled by a scanty white fur. There was a heavy odour
[The Sisters] [211] sideboard and brought out a decanter of sherry and some
[The Sisters] [212] wine-glasses. She set these on the table and invited us to take a
[The Sisters] [223] "Ah, well, he's gone to a better world."
[The Sisters] [226] the stem of her wine-glass before sipping a little.
[The Sisters] [231] the breath went out of him. He had a beautiful death, God be
[The Sisters] [236] "Father O'Rourke was in with him a Tuesday and anointed him and
[The Sisters] [247] resigned. No one would think he'd make such a beautiful corpse."
[The Sisters] [251] She sipped a little more from her glass and said:
[The Sisters] [253] "Well, Miss Flynn, at any rate it must be a great comfort for you to
[The Sisters] [280] said and done, no friends that a body can trust."
[The Sisters] [304] She laid a finger against her nose and frowned: then she continued:
[The Sisters] [307] over he'd go out for a drive one fine day just to see the old house
[The Sisters] [313] together of a Sunday evening. He had his mind set on that.... Poor
[The Sisters] [326] "Yes," said my aunt. "He was a disappointed man. You could see
[The Sisters] [329] A silence took possession of the little room and, under cover of it,
[The Sisters] [331] quietly to my chair in the comer. Eliza seemed to have fallen into a
[The Sisters] [333] and after a long pause she said slowly:
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [348] couldn't see a sight of him anywhere. So then the clerk suggested
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[An Encounter] [368] IT WAS Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us. He had a
[An Encounter] [373] carry it by storm; or we fought a pitched battle on the grass. But,
[An Encounter] [380] capered round the garden, an old tea-cosy on his head, beating a
[An Encounter] [385] Everyone was incredulous when it was reported that he had a
[An Encounter] [388] A spirit of unruliness diffused itself among us and, under its
[An Encounter] [400] of Roman History clumsy Leo Dillon was discovered with a copy
[An Encounter] [415] for a drink. I'm surprised at boys like you, educated, reading such
[An Encounter] [422] influence of the school was at a distance I began to hunger again
[An Encounter] [432] With Leo Dillon and a boy named Mahony I planned a day's
[An Encounter] [452] hurried along the canal bank. It was a mild sunny morning in the
[An Encounter] [455] and watching the docile horses pulling a tramload of business
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [478] bob and a tanner instead of a bob."
[An Encounter] [483] chased a crowd of ragged girls, brandishing his unloaded catapult
[An Encounter] [489] the silver badge of a cricket club in his cap. When we came to the
[An Encounter] [490] Smoothing Iron we arranged a siege; but it was a failure because
[An Encounter] [492] by saying what a funk he was and guessing how many he would
[An Encounter] [495] We came then near the river. We spent a long time walking about
[An Encounter] [513] transported in the company of two labourers and a little Jew with a
[An Encounter] [517] observed from the other quay. Some bystander said that she was a
[An Encounter] [523] was a tall man who amused the crowd on the quay by calling out
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [534] and bought a bottle of raspberry lemonade each. Refreshed by this,
[An Encounter] [535] Mahony chased a cat down a lane, but the cat escaped into a wide
[An Encounter] [537] made at once for a sloping bank over the ridge of which we could
[An Encounter] [549] the bank for some time without speaking I saw a man approaching
[An Encounter] [553] the other hand he held a stick with which he tapped the turf lightly.
[An Encounter] [554] He was shabbily dressed in a suit of greenish-black and wore what
[An Encounter] [555] we used to call a jerry hat with a high crown. He seemed to be
[An Encounter] [567] would be a very hot summer and adding that the seasons had
[An Encounter] [568] changed gready since he was a boy--a long time ago. He said that
[An Encounter] [571] expressed these sentiments which bored us a little we kept silent.
[An Encounter] [577] "Ah, I can see you are a bookworm like myself. Now," he added,
[An Encounter] [584] read." Mahony asked why couldn't boys read them--a question
[An Encounter] [599] "Every boy," he said, "has a little sweetheart."
[An Encounter] [601] His attitude on this point struck me as strangely liberal in a man of
[An Encounter] [605] something or felt a sudden chill. As he proceeded I noticed that his
[An Encounter] [609] There was nothing he liked, he said, so much as looking at a nice
[An Encounter] [622] After a long while his monologue paused. He stood up slowly,
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [626] remained silent when he had gone. After a silence of a few
[An Encounter] [634] "I say... He's a queer old josser!"
[An Encounter] [649] a very rough boy and asked did he get whipped often at school. I
[An Encounter] [655] ought to be whipped and well whipped. When a boy was rough and
[An Encounter] [656] unruly there was nothing would do him any good but a good sound
[An Encounter] [657] whipping. A slap on the hand or a box on the ear was no good:
[An Encounter] [658] what he wanted was to get a nice warm whipping. I was surprised
[An Encounter] [660] so I met the gaze of a pair of bottle-green eyes peering at me from
[An Encounter] [661] under a twitching forehead. I turned my eyes away again.
[An Encounter] [664] his recent liberalism. He said that if ever he found a boy talking to
[An Encounter] [665] girls or having a girl for a sweetheart he would whip him and whip
[An Encounter] [666] him; and that would teach him not to be talking to girls. And if a
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[An Encounter] [668] give him such a whipping as no boy ever got in this world. He said
[An Encounter] [670] He described to me how he would whip such a boy as if he were
[An Encounter] [677] Lest I should betray my agitation I delayed a few moments
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [695] NORTH RICHMOND STREET being blind, was a quiet street
[Araby] [698] detached from its neighbours in a square ground The other houses
[Araby] [702] The former tenant of our house, a priest, had died in the back
[Araby] [705] littered with old useless papers. Among these I found a few
[Araby] [709] yellow. The wild garden behind the house contained a central
[Araby] [710] apple-tree and a few straggling bushes under one of which I found
[Araby] [711] the late tenant's rusty bicycle-pump. He had been a very charitable
[Araby] [724] odours arose from the ashpits, to the dark odorous stables where a
[Araby] [746] spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name
[Araby] [747] was like a summons to all my foolish blood.
[Araby] [755] street-singers, who sang a come-all-you about O'Donovan Rossa,
[Araby] [756] or a ballad about the troubles in our native land. These noises
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [758] bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes. Her name sprang
[Araby] [761] could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to
[Araby] [765] was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [781] would be a splendid bazaar, she said she would love to go.
[Araby] [785] While she spoke she turned a silver bracelet round and round her
[Araby] [786] wrist. She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat
[Araby] [793] border of a petticoat, just visible as she stood at ease.
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Araby] [865] believed in the old saying: "All work and no play makes Jack a
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Araby] [871] I held a florin tightly in my hand as I strode down Buckingham
[Araby] [874] journey. I took my seat in a third-class carriage of a deserted train.
[Araby] [877] twinkling river. At Westland Row Station a crowd of people
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Araby] [880] the bare carriage. In a few minutes the train drew up beside an
[Araby] [882] by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten. In front
[Araby] [883] of me was a large building which displayed the magical name.
[Araby] [886] would be closed, I passed in quickly through a turnstile, handing a
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[Araby] [888] girdled at half its height by a gallery. Nearly all the stalls were
[Araby] [890] a silence like that which pervades a church after a service. I
[Araby] [891] walked into the centre of the bazaar timidly. A few people were
[Araby] [892] gathered about the stalls which were still open. Before a curtain,
[Araby] [894] lamps, two men were counting money on a salver. I listened to the
[Araby] [899] the door of the stall a young lady was talking and laughing with
[Araby] [903] "O, I never said such a thing!"
[Araby] [913] "0, there's a ... fib!"
[Araby] [917] seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty. I looked
[Araby] [931] the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a
[Araby] [935] Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and
[Eveline] [947] new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which
[Eveline] [949] a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it--not
[Eveline] [958] besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and
[Eveline] [965] objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years,
[Eveline] [972] Alacoque. He had been a school friend of her father. Whenever he
[Eveline] [973] showed the photograph to a visitor her father used to pass it with a
[Eveline] [983] when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she
[Eveline] [984] was a fool, perhaps; and her place would be filled up by
[Eveline] [994] But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1020] and got their meals regularly. It was hard work--a hard life--but
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1027] where he had a home waiting for her. How well she remembered
[Eveline] [1028] the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the
[Eveline] [1029] main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He
[Eveline] [1031] and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. Then they had
[Eveline] [1035] theatre with him. He was awfully fond of music and sang a little.
[Eveline] [1037] lass that loves a sailor, she always felt pleasantly confused. He
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1040] him. He had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck boy
[Eveline] [1041] at a pound a month on a ship of the Allan Line going out to
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1060] been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[Eveline] [1068] dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street
[Eveline] [1073] dark room at the other side of the hall and outside she heard a
[Eveline] [1087] She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must
[Eveline] [1090] had a right to happiness. Frank would take her in his arms, fold her
[Eveline] [1097] doors of the sheds she caught a glimpse of the black mass of the
[Eveline] [1099] answered nothing. She felt her cheek pale and cold and, out of a
[Eveline] [1101] was her duty. The boat blew a long mournful whistle into the mist.
[Eveline] [1105] distress awoke a nausea in her body and she kept moving her lips
[Eveline] [1108] A bell clanged upon her heart. She felt him seize her hand:
[Eveline] [1119] frenzy. Amid the seas she sent a cry of anguish.
[Eveline] [1125] to him, passive, like a helpless animal. Her eyes gave him no sign
[After the Race] [1141] driver of the winning German car was reported a Belgian. Each
[After the Race] [1142] blue car, therefore, received a double measure of welcome as it
[After the Race] [1145] these trimly built cars was a party of four young men whose spirits
[After the Race] [1148] They were Charles Segouin, the owner of the car; Andre Riviere, a
[After the Race] [1149] young electrician of Canadian birth; a huge Hungarian named
[After the Race] [1150] Villona and a neatly groomed young man named Doyle. Segouin
[After the Race] [1152] orders in advance (he was about to start a motor establishment in
[After the Race] [1157] he had had a very satisfactory luncheon; and besides he was an
[After the Race] [1161] He was about twenty-six years of age, with a soft, light brown
[After the Race] [1164] early. He had made his money as a butcher in Kingstown and by
[After the Race] [1168] rich enough to be alluded to in the Dublin newspapers as a
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[After the Race] [1172] took to bad courses for a while. He had money and he was popular;
[After the Race] [1174] circles. Then he had been sent for a term to Cambridge to see a
[After the Race] [1180] to own some of the biggest hotels in France. Such a person (as his
[After the Race] [1182] the charming companion he was. Villona was entertaining also--a
[After the Race] [1187] behind. Decidedly Villona was in excellent spirits; he kept up a
[After the Race] [1191] not altogether pleasant for him, as he had nearly always to make a
[After the Race] [1192] deft guess at the meaning and shout back a suitable answer in the
[After the Race] [1193] face of a high wind. Besides Villona's humming would confuse
[After the Race] [1202] driver had disclosed a line of shining white teeth. It was pleasant
[After the Race] [1204] nudges and significant looks. Then as to money--he really had a
[After the Race] [1205] great sum under his control. Segouin, perhaps, would not think it a
[After the Race] [1213] his substance! It was a serious thing for him.
[After the Race] [1215] Of course, the investment was a good one and Segouin had
[After the Race] [1216] managed to give the impression that it was by a favour of
[After the Race] [1218] of the concern. Jimmy had a respect for his father's shrewdness in
[After the Race] [1224] come careering along the country roads! The journey laid a
[After the Race] [1232] friend alighted. A little knot of people collected on the footpath to
[After the Race] [1238] northward with a curious feeling of disappointment in the exercise,
[After the Race] [1239] while the city hung its pale globes of light above them in a haze of
[After the Race] [1242] In Jimmy's house this dinner had been pronounced an occasion. A
[After the Race] [1243] certain pride mingled with his parents' trepidation, a certain
[After the Race] [1246] well when he was dressed and, as he stood in the hall giving a last
[After the Race] [1250] Villona and his manner expressed a real respect for foreign
[After the Race] [1252] upon the Hungarian, who was beginning to have a sharp desire for
[After the Race] [1256] a very refined taste. The party was increased by a young
[After the Race] [1258] Cambridge. The young men supped in a snug room lit by electric
[After the Race] [1262] Englishman's manner. A graceful image of his, he thought, and a
[After the Race] [1278] open a window significantly.
[After the Race] [1280] That night the city wore the mask of a capital. The five young men
[After the Race] [1281] strolled along Stephen's Green in a faint cloud of aromatic smoke.
[After the Race] [1284] Grafton Street a short fat man was putting two handsome ladies on
[After the Race] [1285] a car in charge of another fat man. The car drove off and the short
[After the Race] [1292] A torrent of talk followed. Farley was an American. No one knew
[After the Race] [1294] noisiest, but all the men were excited. They got up on a car,
[After the Race] [1296] the crowd, blended now into soft colours, to a music of merry
[After the Race] [1297] bells. They took the train at Westland Row and in a few seconds,
[After the Race] [1303] It was a serene summer night; the harbour lay like a darkened
[After the Race] [1309] They got into a rowboat at the slip and made out for the
[After the Race] [1315] There was a yacht piano in the cabin. Villona played a waltz for
[After the Race] [1318] figures. What merriment! Jimmy took his part with a will; this was
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[After the Race] [1323] America. Jimmy made a speech, a long speech, Villona saying:
[After the Race] [1324] "Hear! hear!" whenever there was a pause. There was a great
[After the Race] [1325] clapping of hands when he sat down. It must have been a good
[After the Race] [1340] then someone proposed one great game for a finish.
[After the Race] [1343] a terrible game. They stopped just before the end of it to drink for
[After the Race] [1356] door opened and he saw the Hungarian standing in a shaft of grey
[Two Gallants] [1364] and a mild warm air, a memory of summer, circulated in the
[Two Gallants] [1366] with a gaily coloured crowd. Like illumined pearls the lamps
[Two Gallants] [1372] them was just bringing a long monologue to a close. The other,
[Two Gallants] [1375] amused listening face. He was squat and ruddy. A yachting cap
[Two Gallants] [1386] face, when the waves of expression had passed over it, had a
[Two Gallants] [1390] noiselessly for fully half a minute. Then he said:
[Two Gallants] [1401] was tired for he had been talking all the afternoon in a
[Two Gallants] [1402] public-house in Dorset Street. Most people considered Lenehan a
[Two Gallants] [1405] against him. He had a brave manner of coming up to a party of
[Two Gallants] [1406] them in a bar and of holding himself nimbly at the borders of the
[Two Gallants] [1407] company until he was included in a round. He was a sporting
[Two Gallants] [1408] vagrant armed with a vast stock of stories, limericks and riddles.
[Two Gallants] [1418] spotted a fine tart under Waterhouse's clock and said good- night,
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1421] round her and squeezed her a bit that night. Then next Sunday,
[Two Gallants] [1423] brought her into a field there. She told me she used to go with a
[Two Gallants] [1432] "I told her I was out of a job," said Corley. "I told her I was in
[Two Gallants] [1434] But she thinks I'm a bit of class, you know."
[Two Gallants] [1442] burly body made his friend execute a few light skips from the path
[Two Gallants] [1448] upon it sideways, looked like a bulb which had grown out of
[Two Gallants] [1452] he was about town. Whenever any job was vacant a friend was
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1463] Lenehan offered his friend a cigarette. As the two young men
[Two Gallants] [1466] large faint moon circled with a double halo. He watched earnestly
[Two Gallants] [1479] man. She's a bit gone on me."
[Two Gallants] [1481] "You're what I call a gay Lothario," said Lenehan. "And the proper
[Two Gallants] [1482] kind of a Lothario, too!"
[Two Gallants] [1484] A shade of mockery relieved the servility of his manner. To save
[Two Gallants] [1486] interpretation of raillery. But Corley had not a subtle mind.
[Two Gallants] [1488] "There's nothing to touch a good slavey," he affirmed. "Take my
[Two Gallants] [1495] tram somewhere and pay the tram or take them to a band or a play
[Two Gallants] [1497] way. I used to spend money on them right enough," he added, in a
[Two Gallants] [1502] "I know that game," he said, "and it's a mug's game."
[Two Gallants] [1514] She was... a bit of all right," he said regretfully.
[Two Gallants] [1519] night with two fellows with her on a car."
[Two Gallants] [1532] Lenehan made a tragic gesture.
[Two Gallants] [1542] her wait a bit."
[Two Gallants] [1551] off all right? You know it's a ticklish job. They're damn close on
[Two Gallants] [1562] wanted. A little tact was necessary. But Corley's brow was soon
[Two Gallants] [1565] "She's a fine decent tart," he said, with appreciation; "that's what
[Two Gallants] [1569] Street. Not far from the porch of the club a harpist stood in the
[Two Gallants] [1570] roadway, playing to a little ring of listeners. He plucked at the
[Two Gallants] [1586] At the corner of Hume Street a young woman was standing. She
[Two Gallants] [1587] wore a blue dress and a white sailor hat. She stood on the
[Two Gallants] [1588] curbstone, swinging a sunshade in one hand. Lenehan grew lively.
[Two Gallants] [1590] "Let's have a look at her, Corley," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1598] want is to have a look at her. I'm not going to eat her."
[Two Gallants] [1600] "O ... A look at her?" said Corley, more amiably. "Well... I'll tell
[Two Gallants] [1626] Lenehan observed them for a few minutes. Then he walked rapidly
[Two Gallants] [1629] heavily scented and his eyes made a swift anxious scrutiny of the
[Two Gallants] [1631] blue serge skirt was held at the waist by a belt of black leather.
[Two Gallants] [1633] her body, catching the light stuff of her white blouse like a clip.
[Two Gallants] [1634] She wore a short black jacket with mother-of-pearl buttons and a
[Two Gallants] [1636] carefully disordered and a big bunch of red flowers was pinned in
[Two Gallants] [1640] were blunt. She had broad nostrils, a straggling mouth which lay
[Two Gallants] [1641] open in a contented leer, and two projecting front teeth. As he
[Two Gallants] [1643] Corley returned a salute to the air. This he did by raising his hand
[Two Gallants] [1647] and waited. After waiting for a little time he saw them coming
[Two Gallants] [1652] young woman's face like a big ball revolving on a pivot. He kept
[Two Gallants] [1661] played the melody while his fingers swept a scale of variations idly
[Two Gallants] [1668] invited him to be bold. He knew that he would have to speak a
[Two Gallants] [1670] too dry for such a task. The problem of how he could pass the
[Two Gallants] [1671] hours till he met Corley again troubled him a little. He could think
[Two Gallants] [1675] mood. He paused at last before the window of a poor-looking shop
[Two Gallants] [1678] Ginger Beer and Ginger Ale. A cut ham was exposed on a great
[Two Gallants] [1679] blue dish while near it on a plate lay a segment of very light
[Two Gallants] [1687] opposite two work-girls and a mechanic. A slatternly girl waited
[Two Gallants] [1690] "How much is a plate of peas?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1694] "Bring me a plate of peas," he said, "and a bottle of ginger beer."
[Two Gallants] [1697] had been followed by a pause of talk. His face was heated. To
[Two Gallants] [1701] a subdued voice. The girl brought him a plate of grocer's hot peas,
[Two Gallants] [1702] seasoned with pepper and vinegar, a fork and his ginger beer. He
[Two Gallants] [1703] ate his food greedily and found it so good that he made a note of
[Two Gallants] [1712] get a good job? Would he never have a home of his own? He
[Two Gallants] [1713] thought how pleasant it would be to have a warm fire to sit by and
[Two Gallants] [1714] a good dinner to sit down to. He had walked the streets long
[Two Gallants] [1721] some good simple-minded girl with a little of the ready.
[Two Gallants] [1731] some figures in the crowd and sometimes made a critical remark.
[Two Gallants] [1735] Westmoreland Street asked was it true that Mac had won a bit over
[Two Gallants] [1736] a billiard match. Lenehan did not know: he said that Holohan had
[Two Gallants] [1739] He left his friends at a quarter to ten and went up George's Street.
[Two Gallants] [1747] took his stand in the shadow of a lamp and brought out one of the
[Two Gallants] [1761] the College of Surgeons. Would Corley do a thing like that? He lit
[Two Gallants] [1765] broke and he flung it into the road with a curse.
[Two Gallants] [1772] pricked him like the point of a sharp instrument. He knew Corley
[Two Gallants] [1777] talked for a few moments and then the young woman went down
[Two Gallants] [1778] the steps into the area of a house. Corley remained standing at the
[Two Gallants] [1779] edge of the path, a little distance from the front steps. Some
[Two Gallants] [1781] cautiously. A woman came running down the front steps and
[Two Gallants] [1783] hers from view for a few seconds and then she reappeared running
[Two Gallants] [1788] fell. He took them as a warning and, glancing back towards the
[Two Gallants] [1809] breathing uneasily. He was baffled and a note of menace pierced
[Two Gallants] [1815] with a grave gesture he extended a hand towards the light and,
[Two Gallants] [1816] smiling, opened it slowly to the gaze of his disciple. A small gold
[The Boarding House] [1821] MRS. MOONEY was a butcher's daughter. She was a woman who
[The Boarding House] [1822] was quite able to keep things to herself: a determined woman. She
[The Boarding House] [1823] had married her father's foreman and opened a butcher's shop near
[The Boarding House] [1827] was sure to break out again a few days after. By fighting his wife
[The Boarding House] [1830] had to sleep a neighbour's house.
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1835] enlist himself as a sheriff's man. He was a shabby stooped little
[The Boarding House] [1836] drunkard with a white face and a white moustache white eyebrows,
[The Boarding House] [1838] day long he sat in the bailiff's room, waiting to be put on a job.
[The Boarding House] [1840] the butcher business and set up a boarding house in Hardwicke
[The Boarding House] [1841] Street, was a big imposing woman. Her house had a floating
[The Boarding House] [1850] Mrs. Mooney's young men paid fifteen shillings a week for board
[The Boarding House] [1855] son, who was clerk to a commission agent in Fleet Street, had the
[The Boarding House] [1856] reputation of being a hard case. He was fond of using soldiers'
[The Boarding House] [1858] met his friends he had always a good one to tell them and he was
[The Boarding House] [1859] always sure to be on to a good thing-that is to say, a likely horse or
[The Boarding House] [1860] a likely artiste. He was also handy with the mits and sang comic
[The Boarding House] [1861] songs. On Sunday nights there would often be a reunion in Mrs.
[The Boarding House] [1867] I'm a ... naughty girl.
[The Boarding House] [1871] Polly was a slim girl of nineteen; she had light soft hair and a
[The Boarding House] [1872] small full mouth. Her eyes, which were grey with a shade of green
[The Boarding House] [1873] through them, had a habit of glancing upwards when she spoke
[The Boarding House] [1874] with anyone, which made her look like a little perverse madonna.
[The Boarding House] [1875] Mrs. Mooney had first sent her daughter to be a typist in a
[The Boarding House] [1876] corn-factor's office but, as a disreputable sheriff's man used to
[The Boarding House] [1877] come every other day to the office, asking to be allowed to say a
[The Boarding House] [1881] feel that there is a young woman not very far away. Polly, of
[The Boarding House] [1882] course, flirted with the young men but Mrs. Mooney, who was a
[The Boarding House] [1884] away: none of them meant business. Things went on so for a long
[The Boarding House] [1894] affair, still Mrs. Mooney did not intervene. Polly began to grow a
[The Boarding House] [1897] Mooney intervened. She dealt with moral problems as a cleaver
[The Boarding House] [1900] It was a bright Sunday morning of early summer, promising heat,
[The Boarding House] [1901] but with a fresh breeze blowing. All the windows of the boarding
[The Boarding House] [1919] awkward by her not wishing to receive the news in too cavalier a
[The Boarding House] [1934] assuming that he was a man of honour and he had simply abused
[The Boarding House] [1937] be his excuse since he was a man who had seen something of the
[The Boarding House] [1945] Some mothers would be content to patch up such an affair for a
[The Boarding House] [1952] would win. He was a serious young man, not rakish or loud-voiced
[The Boarding House] [1957] Besides, he had been employed for thirteen years in a great
[The Boarding House] [1960] well. She knew he had a good screw for one thing and she
[The Boarding House] [1961] suspected he had a bit of stuff put by.
[The Boarding House] [1971] jaws and every two or three minutes a mist gathered on his glasses
[The Boarding House] [1974] night before was a cause of acute pain to him; the priest had drawn
[The Boarding House] [1976] magnified his sin that he was almost thankful at being afforded a
[The Boarding House] [1980] hear of it. Dublin is such a small city: everyone knows everyone
[The Boarding House] [1986] diligence thrown away! As a young man he had sown his wild oats,
[The Boarding House] [1989] all passed and done with... nearly. He still bought a copy of
[The Boarding House] [1991] duties and for nine-tenths of the year lived a regular life. He had
[The Boarding House] [1994] father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a
[The Boarding House] [1995] certain fame. He had a notion that he was being had. He could
[The Boarding House] [1996] imagine his friends talking of the affair and laughing. She was a
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2023] had been blown out by a gust. It was her bath night. She wore a
[The Boarding House] [2027] as she lit and steadied her candle a faint perfume arose.
[The Boarding House] [2033] a little tumbler of punch ready for him. Perhaps they could be
[The Boarding House] [2036] They used to go upstairs together on tiptoe, each with a candle,
[The Boarding House] [2044] reparation must be made for such a sin.
[The Boarding House] [2056] he would never hear again of his trouble, and yet a force pushed
[The Boarding House] [2061] lover's eyes rested for a second or two on a thick bulldog face and
[The Boarding House] [2062] a pair of thick short arms. When he reached the foot of the
[The Boarding House] [2067] artistes, a little blond Londoner, had made a rather free allusion to
[The Boarding House] [2069] violence. Everyone tried to quiet him. The music-hall artiste, a
[The Boarding House] [2072] that sort of a game on with his sister he'd bloody well put his teeth
[The Boarding House] [2075] Polly sat for a little time on the side of the bed, crying. Then she
[The Boarding House] [2078] cool water. She looked at herself in profile and readjusted a
[The Boarding House] [2080] at the foot. She regarded the pillows for a long time and the sight
[The Boarding House] [2083] into a reverie. There was no longer any perturbation visible on her
[A Little Cloud] [2103] A LITTLE CLOUD
[A Little Cloud] [2110] place and he had deserved to win. It was something to have a
[A Little Cloud] [2117] gave one the idea of being a little man. His hands were white and
[A Little Cloud] [2122] caught a glimpse of a row of childish white teeth.
[A Little Cloud] [2126] under a shabby and necessitous guise had become a brilliant figure
[A Little Cloud] [2128] gaze out of the office window. The glow of a late autumn sunset
[A Little Cloud] [2129] covered the grass plots and walks. It cast a shower of kindly
[A Little Cloud] [2135] life) he became sad. A gentle melancholy took possession of him.
[A Little Cloud] [2149] feudal arch of the King's Inns, a neat modest figure, and walked
[A Little Cloud] [2151] the air had grown sharp. A horde of grimy children populated the
[A Little Cloud] [2158] was full of a present joy.
[A Little Cloud] [2175] and at times a sound of low fugitive laughter made him tremble
[A Little Cloud] [2176] like a leaf.
[A Little Cloud] [2182] to say that Ignatius Gallaher was wild Of course, he did mix with a
[A Little Cloud] [2186] flight. But nobody denied him talent. There was always a certain...
[A Little Cloud] [2189] money he kept up a bold face. Little Chandler remembered (and
[A Little Cloud] [2190] the remembrance brought a slight flush of pride to his cheek) one
[A Little Cloud] [2191] of Ignatius Gallaher's sayings when he was in a tight corner:
[A Little Cloud] [2205] pitied the poor stunted houses. They seemed to him a band of
[A Little Cloud] [2209] themselves and begone. He wondered whether he could write a
[A Little Cloud] [2213] thought that a poetic moment had touched him took life within
[A Little Cloud] [2217] sober inartistic life. A light began to tremble on the horizon of his
[A Little Cloud] [2222] was a poet's soul. Melancholy was the dominant note of his
[A Little Cloud] [2223] temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by
[A Little Cloud] [2225] give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen.
[A Little Cloud] [2227] crowd but he might appeal to a little circle of kindred minds. The
[A Little Cloud] [2233] pervades these poems." ... "The Celtic note." It was a pity his name
[A Little Cloud] [2244] The light and noise of the bar held him at the doorways for a few
[A Little Cloud] [2249] make his errand appear serious), but when his sight cleared a little
[A Little Cloud] [2257] flavour.... Here, garcon, bring us two halves of malt whisky, like a
[A Little Cloud] [2260] signs of aging in me--eh, what? A little grey and thin on the top--
[A Little Cloud] [2263] Ignatius Gallaher took off his hat and displayed a large closely
[A Little Cloud] [2269] the thin hair at the crown. Little Chandler shook his head as a
[A Little Cloud] [2275] for a few days. I'm deuced glad, I can tell you, to get back to the
[A Little Cloud] [2276] old country. Does a fellow good, a bit of a holiday. I feel a ton
[A Little Cloud] [2285] "I drink very little as a rule," said Little Chandler modestly. "An
[A Little Cloud] [2294] seems to be in a bad way. What's he doing?"
[A Little Cloud] [2298] "But Hogan has a good sit, hasn't he?"
[A Little Cloud] [2311] mornings when I had a sore head and a fur on my tongue. You'd
[A Little Cloud] [2312] want to knock about a bit in the world. Have you never been
[A Little Cloud] [2313] anywhere even for a trip?"
[A Little Cloud] [2324] "I should think I have! I've knocked about there a little."
[A Little Cloud] [2328] He sipped a little of his drink while Ignatius Gallaher finished his
[A Little Cloud] [2342] Bohemian cafes. Hot stuff! Not for a pious chap like you,
[A Little Cloud] [2359] they've a great feeling for the Irish there. When they heard I was
[A Little Cloud] [2367] Ignatius Gallaher made a catholic gesture with his right arm.
[A Little Cloud] [2384] "London!" said Ignatius Gallaher. "It's six of one and half-a-dozen
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2403] "it's a rum world. Talk of immorality! I've heard of cases--what
[A Little Cloud] [2406] Ignatius Gallaher puffed thoughtfully at his cigar and then, in a
[A Little Cloud] [2415] a story about an English duchess--a story which he knew to be
[A Little Cloud] [2424] Well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "it's a relaxation to come over here,
[A Little Cloud] [2426] You can't help having a certain feeling for it. That's human
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2455] "A little boy."
[A Little Cloud] [2465] back. My wife will be delighted to meet you. We can have a little
[A Little Cloud] [2474] fellow, clever young chap he is too, and we arranged to go to a
[A Little Cloud] [2480] I may take a little skip over here now that I've broken the ice. It's
[A Little Cloud] [2481] only a pleasure deferred."
[A Little Cloud] [2492] Ignatius Gallaher took out a large gold watch and looked a it.
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2499] as a deoc an doruis--that's good vernacular for a small whisky, I
[A Little Cloud] [2503] his face a few moments before was establishing itself. A trifle
[A Little Cloud] [2506] cigar had confused his mind, for he was a delicate and abstinent
[A Little Cloud] [2509] noise, of listening to Gallaher's stories and of sharing for a brief
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2550] watched him for a few moments and then said:
[A Little Cloud] [2554] have a good fat account at the bank or she won't do for me."
[A Little Cloud] [2563] You wait a while my boy. See if I don't play my cards properly.
[A Little Cloud] [2564] When I go about a thing I mean business, I tell you. You just wait."
[A Little Cloud] [2567] loudly. Then he looked thoughtfully before him and said in a
[A Little Cloud] [2573] He imitated with his mouth the act of tasting and made a wry face.
[A Little Cloud] [2575] "Must get a bit stale, I should think," he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2577] Little Chandler sat in the room off the hall, holding a child in his
[A Little Cloud] [2580] the evening to help. But Monica had gone home long ago. It was a
[A Little Cloud] [2583] coffee from Bewley's. Of course she was in a bad humour and gave
[A Little Cloud] [2586] she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and
[A Little Cloud] [2592] A little lamp with a white china shade stood upon the table and its
[A Little Cloud] [2593] light fell over a photograph which was enclosed in a frame of
[A Little Cloud] [2596] blouse which he had brought her home as a present one Saturday.
[A Little Cloud] [2607] it was a regular swindle to charge ten and elevenpence for it. At
[A Little Cloud] [2627] it herself and it reminded hi of her. It too was prim and pretty. A
[A Little Cloud] [2631] furniture still to be paid for. If he could only write a book and get
[A Little Cloud] [2634] A volume of Byron's poems lay before him on the table. He opened
[A Little Cloud] [2640] Not e'en a Zephyr wanders through the grove,
[A Little Cloud] [2649] wanted to describe: his sensation of a few hours before on Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2663] useless! He was a prisoner for life. His arms trembled with anger
[A Little Cloud] [2668] The child stopped for an instant, had a spasm of fright and began
[A Little Cloud] [2675] alarmed. He counted seven sobs without a break between them and
[A Little Cloud] [2678] The door was burst open and a young woman ran in, panting.
[A Little Cloud] [2682] The child, hearing its mother's voice, broke out into a paroxysm of
[Counterparts] [2712] THE bell rang furiously and, when Miss Parker went to the tube, a
[Counterparts] [2713] furious voice called out in a piercing North of Ireland accent:
[Counterparts] [2717] Miss Parker returned to her machine, saying to a man who was
[Counterparts] [2718] writing at a desk:
[Counterparts] [2724] bulk. He had a hanging face, dark wine-coloured, with fair
[Counterparts] [2727] the clients, went out of the office with a heavy step.
[Counterparts] [2730] where a door bore a brass plate with the inscription Mr. Alleyne.
[Counterparts] [2737] a little man wearing gold-rimmed glasses on a cleanshaven face,
[Counterparts] [2738] shot his head up over a pile of documents. The head itself was so
[Counterparts] [2739] pink and hairless it seemed like a large egg reposing on the papers.
[Counterparts] [2740] Mr. Alleyne did not lose a moment:
[Counterparts] [2743] complain of you? May I ask you why you haven't made a copy of
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2767] Crosbie & Alleyne, gauging its fragility. A spasm of rage gripped
[Counterparts] [2768] his throat for a few moments and then passed, leaving after it a
[Counterparts] [2770] that he must have a good night's drinking. The middle of the month
[Counterparts] [2794] was falling and in a few minutes they would be lighting the gas:
[Counterparts] [2805] man pulled a shepherd's plaid cap out of his pocket, put it on his
[Counterparts] [2808] corner and all at once dived into a doorway. He was now safe in
[Counterparts] [2813] "Here, Pat, give us a g.p.. like a good fellow."
[Counterparts] [2815] The curate brought him a glass of plain porter. The man drank it at
[Counterparts] [2816] a gulp and asked for a caraway seed. He put his penny on the
[Counterparts] [2820] Darkness, accompanied by a thick fog, was gaining upon the dusk
[Counterparts] [2823] wondering whether he could finish his copy in time. On the stairs a
[Counterparts] [2835] himself a laugh.
[Counterparts] [2837] "I know that game," he said. "Five times in one day is a little bit...
[Counterparts] [2838] Well, you better look sharp and get a copy of our correspondence
[Counterparts] [2852] room. Miss Delacour was a middle-aged woman of Jewish
[Counterparts] [2854] money. She came to the office often and stayed a long time when
[Counterparts] [2861] notice of his bow. Mr. Alleyne tapped a finger on the
[Counterparts] [2871] the machine for a few minutes and then set to work to finish his
[Counterparts] [2873] the glare and rattle of the public-house. It was a night for hot
[Counterparts] [2878] Bernard instead of Bernard Bodley and had to begin again on a
[Counterparts] [2887] The barometer of his emotional nature was set for a spell of riot.
[Counterparts] [2893] Alleyne began a tirade of abuse, saying that two letters were
[Counterparts] [2895] he had made a faithful copy. The tirade continued: it was so bitter
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2908] had found a felicitous moment:
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2912] There was a pause in the very breathing of the clerks. Everyone
[Counterparts] [2914] neighbours) and Miss Delacour, who was a stout amiable person,
[Counterparts] [2915] began to smile broadly. Mr. Alleyne flushed to the hue of a wild
[Counterparts] [2916] rose and his mouth twitched with a dwarf s passion. He shook his
[Counterparts] [2929] He stood in a doorway opposite the office watching to see if the
[Counterparts] [2932] say a word to him when he was with the chief clerk. The man felt
[Counterparts] [2935] what a hornet's nest the office would be for him. He could
[Counterparts] [2940] rest; his life would be a hell to him. He had made a proper fool of
[Counterparts] [2946] money, but sure Higgins never had anything for himself. A man
[Counterparts] [2952] than a bob--and a bob was no use. Yet he must get money
[Counterparts] [2961] going to have a good night of it. The clerk in Terry Kelly's said A
[Counterparts] [2964] pawn-office joyfully, making a little cylinder, of the coins between
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [2980] and, when he heard the story, he stood Farrington a half-one,
[Counterparts] [2981] saying it was as smart a thing as ever he heard. Farrington stood a
[Counterparts] [2982] drink in his turn. After a while O'Halloran and Paddy Leonard
[Counterparts] [3002] When that round was over there was a pause. O'Halloran had
[Counterparts] [3010] pushed past the whining matchsellers at the door and formed a
[Counterparts] [3012] stories. Leonard introduced them to a young fellow named
[Counterparts] [3014] knockabout artiste. Farrington stood a drink all round. Weathers
[Counterparts] [3015] said he would take a small Irish and Apollinaris. Farrington, who
[Counterparts] [3018] The talk became theatrical. O'Halloran stood a round and then
[Counterparts] [3023] he was a married man; and Farrington's heavy dirty eyes leered at
[Counterparts] [3033] Weathers came back. Much to Farrington's relief he drank a glass
[Counterparts] [3035] keep them going. Presently two young women with big hats and a
[Counterparts] [3036] young man in a check suit came in and sat at a table close by.
[Counterparts] [3041] muslin was wound round her hat and knotted in a great bow under
[Counterparts] [3044] very often and with much grace; and when, after a little time, she
[Counterparts] [3048] room, she brushed against his chair and said "O, pardon!" in a
[Counterparts] [3053] there was one thing that he hated it was a sponge. He was so angry
[Counterparts] [3062] it was agreed to have a trial of strength. The table was cleared and
[Counterparts] [3070] at having been defeated by such a stripling.
[Counterparts] [3081] peony. Their hands and arms trembled under the stress. After a
[Counterparts] [3083] on to the table. There was a murmur of applause from the
[Counterparts] [3100] A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge
[Counterparts] [3108] lost his reputation as a strong man, having been defeated twice by
[Counterparts] [3109] a mere boy. His heart swelled with fury and, when he thought of
[Counterparts] [3121] His wife was a little sharp-faced woman who bullied her husband
[Counterparts] [3123] They had five children. A little boy came running down the stairs.
[Counterparts] [3158] He took a step to the door and seized the walking-stick which was
[Counterparts] [3172] The boy uttered a squeal of pain as the stick cut his thigh. He
[Counterparts] [3176] "O, pa!" he cried. "Don't beat me, pa! And I'll... I'll say a Hail Mary
[Counterparts] [3177] for you.... I'll say a Hail Mary for you, pa, if you don't beat me....
[Counterparts] [3178] I'll say a Hail Mary...."
[Clay] [3191] Maria was a very, very small person indeed but she had a very long
[Clay] [3192] nose and a very long chin. She talked a little through her nose,
[Clay] [3198] "Maria, you are a veritable peace-maker!"
[Clay] [3210] the words A Present from Belfast. She was very fond of that purse
[Clay] [3212] Alphy had gone to Belfast on a Whit-Monday trip. In the purse
[Clay] [3214] shillings clear after paying tram fare. What a nice evening they
[Clay] [3222] laundry. Joe was a good fellow. She had nursed him and Alphy
[Clay] [3229] such a bad opinion of Protestants but now she thought they were
[Clay] [3230] very nice people, a little quiet and serious, but still very nice
[Clay] [3236] the matron was such a nice person to deal with, so genteel.
[Clay] [3239] women's room and began to pull the big bell. In a few minutes the
[Clay] [3246] that every woman got her four slices. There was a great deal of
[Clay] [3254] with their mugs on the table, and said she was sorry she hadn't a
[Clay] [3258] well though, of course, she had the notions of a common woman.
[Clay] [3263] morning was a mass morning, changed the hand of the alarm from
[Clay] [3268] dress for mass on Sunday morning when she was a young girl; and
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3279] She hoped they would have a nice evening. She was sure they
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3287] was so full of people that it was a long time before she could get
[Clay] [3288] herself attended to. She bought a dozen of mixed penny cakes, and
[Clay] [3289] at last came out of the shop laden with a big bag. Then she thought
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3295] Henry Street. Here she was a long time in suiting herself and the
[Clay] [3296] stylish young lady behind the counter, who was evidently a little
[Clay] [3299] lady took it all very seriously and finally cut a thick slice of
[Clay] [3306] gentleman made room for her. He was a stout gentleman and he
[Clay] [3307] wore a brown hard hat; he had a square red face and a greyish
[Clay] [3308] moustache. Maria thought he was a colonel-looking gentleman and
[Clay] [3319] her tiny head under the rain, she thought how easy it was to know a
[Clay] [3320] gentleman even when he has a drop taken.
[Clay] [3327] was too good of her to bring such a big bag of cakes and made all
[Clay] [3339] accused of stealing. Everybody had a solution for the mystery and
[Clay] [3349] repeating for her a smart answer which he had made to the
[Clay] [3352] been a very overbearing person to deal with. Joe said he wasn't so
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3358] did they expect Maria to crack nuts without a nutcracker. But
[Clay] [3360] her. Then Joe asked would she take a bottle of stout and Mrs.
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3368] he spoke a word to his brother again and Maria said she was sorry
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3372] nearly being a row on the head of it. But Joe said he would not
[Clay] [3390] saucers. She felt a soft wet substance with her fingers and was
[Clay] [3391] surprised that nobody spoke or took off her bandage. There was a
[Clay] [3392] pause for a few seconds; and then a great deal of scuffling and
[Clay] [3400] children and Joe made Maria take a glass of wine. Soon they were
[Clay] [3401] all quite merry again and Mrs. Donnelly said Maria would enter a
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3423] Of a high ancestral name,
[A Painful Case] [3435] A PAINFUL CASE
[A Painful Case] [3438] live as far as possible from the city of which he was a citizen and
[A Painful Case] [3444] every article of furniture in the room: a black iron bedstead, an
[A Painful Case] [3445] iron washstand, four cane chairs, a clothes- rack, a coal-scuttle, a
[A Painful Case] [3446] fender and irons and a square table on which lay a double desk. A
[A Painful Case] [3448] white wood. The bed was clothed with white bedclothes and a
[A Painful Case] [3449] black and scarlet rug covered the foot. A little hand-mirror hung
[A Painful Case] [3450] above the washstand and during the day a white-shaded lamp stood
[A Painful Case] [3453] bulk. A complete Wordsworth stood at one end of the lowest shelf
[A Painful Case] [3454] and a copy of the Maynooth Catechism, sewn into the cloth cover
[A Painful Case] [3455] of a notebook, stood at one end of the top shelf. Writing materials
[A Painful Case] [3456] were always on the desk. In the desk lay a manuscript translation
[A Painful Case] [3458] were written in purple ink, and a little sheaf of papers held
[A Painful Case] [3459] together by a brass pin. In these sheets a sentence was inscribed
[A Painful Case] [3462] On lifting the lid of the desk a faint fragrance escaped--the
[A Painful Case] [3463] fragrance of new cedarwood pencils or of a bottle of gum or of an
[A Painful Case] [3467] disorder. A medival doctor would have called him saturnine. His
[A Painful Case] [3470] black hair and a tawny moustache did not quite cover an
[A Painful Case] [3471] unamiable mouth. His cheekbones also gave his face a harsh
[A Painful Case] [3474] a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often
[A Painful Case] [3475] disappointed. He lived at a little distance from his body, regarding
[A Painful Case] [3478] time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in
[A Painful Case] [3479] the third person and a predicate in the past tense. He never gave
[A Painful Case] [3480] alms to beggars and walked firmly, carrying a stout hazel.
[A Painful Case] [3482] He had been for many years cashier of a private bank in Baggot
[A Painful Case] [3484] midday he went to Dan Burke's and took his lunch--a bottle of
[A Painful Case] [3485] lager beer and a small trayful of arrowroot biscuits. At four o'clock
[A Painful Case] [3488] and where there was a certain plain honesty in the bill of fare. His
[A Painful Case] [3491] brought him sometimes to an opera or a concert: these were the
[A Painful Case] [3508] "What a pity there is such a poor house tonight! It's so hard on
[A Painful Case] [3514] beside her was her daughter he judged her to be a year or so
[A Painful Case] [3518] began with a defiant note but was confused by what seemed a
[A Painful Case] [3520] a temperament of great sensibility. The pupil reasserted itself
[A Painful Case] [3522] prudence, and her astrakhan jacket, moulding a bosom of a certain
[A Painful Case] [3525] He met her again a few weeks afterwards at a concert in Earlsfort
[A Painful Case] [3528] husband but her tone was not such as to make the allusion a
[A Painful Case] [3531] captain of a mercantile boat plying between Dublin and Holland;
[A Painful Case] [3534] Meeting her a third time by accident he found courage to make an
[A Painful Case] [3537] their walks together. Mr. Duffy, however, had a distaste for
[A Painful Case] [3555] Party where he had felt himself a unique figure amidst a score of
[A Painful Case] [3556] sober workmen in a garret lit by an inefficient oil-lamp. When the
[A Painful Case] [3562] which was the produce of a leisure not within their reach. No
[A Painful Case] [3574] they spoke of subjects less remote. Her companionship was like a
[A Painful Case] [3591] words disillusioned him. He did not visit her for a week, then he
[A Painful Case] [3594] confessional they meet in a little cakeshop near the Parkgate. It
[A Painful Case] [3597] to break off their intercourse: every bond, he said, is a bond to
[A Painful Case] [3601] and left her. A few days later he received a parcel containing his
[A Painful Case] [3620] One evening as he was about to put a morsel of corned beef and
[A Painful Case] [3622] themselves on a paragraph in the evening paper which he had
[A Painful Case] [3624] on his plate and read the paragraph attentively. Then he drank a
[A Painful Case] [3627] and over again. The cabbage began to deposit a cold white grease
[A Painful Case] [3629] properly cooked. He said it was very good and ate a few mouthfuls
[A Painful Case] [3634] peeping out of a side-pocket of his tight reefer overcoat. On the
[A Painful Case] [3637] and his breath, issuing irregularly, almost with a sighing sound,
[A Painful Case] [3641] read it not aloud, but moving his lips as a priest does when he
[A Painful Case] [3645] DEATH OF A LADY AT SYDNEY PARADE
[A Painful Case] [3646] A PAINFUL CASE
[A Painful Case] [3660] the guard's whistle he set the train in motion and a second or two
[A Painful Case] [3665] he observed a woman attempting to cross the lines. He ran towards
[A Painful Case] [3669] A juror. "You saw the lady fall?"
[A Painful Case] [3683] sufficient to have caused death in a normal person. Death, in his
[A Painful Case] [3705] reason with her mother and had induced her to join a League. She
[A Painful Case] [3707] a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence and exonerated
[A Painful Case] [3710] The Deputy Coroner said it was a most painful case, and expressed
[A Painful Case] [3722] beside the empty distillery and from time to time a light appeared
[A Painful Case] [3727] a reporter won over to conceal the details of a commonplace
[A Painful Case] [3737] outburst of that night and interpreted it in a harsher sense than he
[A Painful Case] [3746] public-house at Chapelizod Bridge he went in and ordered a hot
[A Painful Case] [3751] value of a gentleman's estate in County Kildare They drank at
[A Painful Case] [3755] them, without seeing or hearing them. After a while they went out
[A Painful Case] [3756] and he called for another punch. He sat a long time over it. The
[A Painful Case] [3758] reading the Herald and yawning. Now and again a tram was heard
[A Painful Case] [3764] had become a memory. He began to feel ill at ease. He asked
[A Painful Case] [3766] on a comedy of deception with her; he could not have lived with
[A Painful Case] [3771] a memory--if anyone remembered him.
[A Painful Case] [3790] sentenced her to ignominy, a death of shame. He knew that the
[A Painful Case] [3794] towards Dublin. Beyond the river he saw a goods train winding out
[A Painful Case] [3795] of Kingsbridge Station, like a worm with a fiery head winding
[A Painful Case] [3802] memory told him. He halted under a tree and allowed the rhythm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3810] OLD JACK raked the cinders together with a piece of cardboard
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3823] Mr. O'Connor, a grey-haired young man, whose face was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3825] tobacco for a cigarette into a shapely cylinder but when spoken to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3827] tobacco again meditatively and after a moment's thought decided
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3830] "Did Mr. Tierney say when he'd be back?" he asked in a sky
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3836] pockets. He took out a pack of thin pasteboard cards.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3838] "I'll get you a match," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3856] let in the wet, he spent a great part of the day sitting by the fire in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3861] Mr. O'Connor tore a strip off the card and, lighting it, lit his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3862] cigarette. As he did so the flame lit up a leaf of dark glossy ivy the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3876] done many a time before. The mother, you know, she cocks him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3883] I've a sup taken. What's the world coming to when sons speaks that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3893] school? 'I won't keep you,' I says. 'You must get a job for yourself.'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3894] But, sure, it's worse whenever he gets a job; he drinks it all."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3900] "Hello! Is this a Freemason's meeting?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3904] "What are you doing in the dark?" asked a voice.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3911] He was a tall, slender young man with a light brown moustache.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3920] table. A denuded room came into view and the fire lost all its
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3921] cheerful colour. The walls of the room were bare except for a copy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3922] of an election address. In the middle of the room was a small table
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3951] difference between a good honest bricklayer and a publican--eh?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3952] Hasn't the working-man as good a right to be in the Corporation as
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3953] anyone else--ay, and a better right than those shoneens that are
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3954] always hat in hand before any fellow with a handle to his name?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3970] to please a German monarch."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3976] kowtowing to a foreign king?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4000] The room was silent again. Then a bustling little man with a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4003] produce a spark from them.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4034] Mr. Henchy began to snuffle and to rub his hands over the fire at a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4037] "For the love of God, Jack, bring us a bit of coal. There must be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4052] pay up like a man instead of: 'O, now, Mr. Henchy, I must speak to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4053] Mr. Fanning.... I've spent a lot of money'? Mean little schoolboy of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4057] "But is that a fact?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4061] to buy a waistcoat or a trousers--moya! But Tricky Dicky's little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4065] The old man returned with a few lumps of coal which he placed
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4068] "Thats a nice how-do-you-do," said Mr. O'Connor. "How does he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4086] Mr. Henchy waited a few moments and then nodded in the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4096] nearly put out the fire, which uttered a hissing protest.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4099] man from the other camp. He's a spy of Colgan's, if you ask me.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4103] "Ah, poor Joe is a decent skin," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4105] "His father was a decent, respectable man," Mr. Henchy admitted.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4106] "Poor old Larry Hynes! Many a good turn he did in his day! But I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4108] understand a fellow being hard up, but what I can't understand is a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4112] "He doesn't get a warm welcome from me when he comes," said
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4118] He's a clever chap, too, with the pen. Do you remember that thing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4121] "Some of these hillsiders and fenians are a bit too clever if ask
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4128] "O, but I know it for a fact," said Mr. Henchy. "They're Castle
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4130] above that.... But there's a certain little nobleman with a cock-eye
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4135] "There's a lineal descendant of Major Sirr for you if you like! O,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4136] the heart's blood of a patriot! That's a fellow now that'd sell his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4138] and thank the Almighty Christ he had a country to sell."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4140] There was a knock at the door.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4144] A person resembling a poor clergyman or a poor actor appeared in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4146] body and it was impossible to say whether he wore a clergyman's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4147] collar or a layman's, because the collar of his shabby frock-coat,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4149] turned up about his neck. He wore a round hat of hard black felt.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4160] were addressing a child.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4164] "No, no, no!" said Father Keon, speaking in a discreet, indulgent,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4169] come in and sit down a minute?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4171] "No, no, thank you. It was just a little business matter," said Father
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4188] He sat down again at the fire. There was silence for a few
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4201] Kavanagh's together. Is he a priest at all?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4204] We haven't many of them, thank God! but we have a few.... He's an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4217] "Is there any chance of a drink itself?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4222] he send up a dozen of stout. I asked him again now, but he was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4223] leaning on the counter in his shirt-sleeves having a deep goster
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4241] I'm thinking seriously of becoming a City Father myself. What do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4249] vermin, with Jack here standing up behind me in a powdered wig
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4254] "Yes. And I'll make Father Keon my private chaplain. We'll have a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4267] sending out for a pound of chops for his dinner? How's that for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4268] high living?' says he. 'Wisha! wisha,' says I. 'A pound of chops,'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4272] At this point there was a knock at the door, and a boy put in his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4278] depositing a basket on the floor with a noise of shaken bottles.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4295] ask him to lend us a corkscrew--for Mr. Henchy, say. Tell him we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4296] won't keep it a minute. Leave the basket there."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4311] "He's not a bad sort," said Mr. Henchy, "only Fanning has such a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4318] "Would you like a drink, boy?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4342] in a long breath of satisfaction.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4344] "Well, I did a good day's work today," said Mr. Henchy, after a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4350] and myself. Between ourselves, you know, Crofton (he's a decent
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4351] chap, of course), but he's not worth a damn as a canvasser. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4352] hasn't a word to throw to a dog. He stands and looks at the people
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4355] Here two men entered the room. One of them was a very fat man
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4357] his sloping figure. He had a big face which resembled a young ox's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4358] face in expression, staring blue eyes and a grizzled moustache. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4359] other man, who was much younger and frailer, had a thin,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4360] clean-shaven face. He wore a very high double collar and a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4376] five minutes than you two'd get in a week."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4395] Mr. Crofton sat down on a box and looked fixedly at the other
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4399] had been a canvasser for Wilkins, the Conservative, but when the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4404] In a few minutes an apologetic "Pok!" was heard as the cork flew
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4408] "I was just telling them, Crofton," said Mr. Henchy, that we got a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4415] old Conservative! 'But isn't your candidate a Nationalist?' said he.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4416] 'He's a respectable man,' said I. 'He's in favour of whatever will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4417] benefit this country. He's a big ratepayer,' I said. 'He has extensive
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4419] to his own advantage to keep down the rates? He's a prominent and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4420] respected citizen,' said I, 'and a Poor Law Guardian, and he doesn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4441] means well by us. He's a jolly fine decent fellow, if you ask me,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4445] comes over here on a friendly visit? Eh? Isn't that right, Crofton?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4454] fond of his glass of grog and he's a bit of a rake, perhaps, and he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4465] he did Parnell was a fit man to lead us? And why, then, would we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4474] capture he said in a deep voice:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4476] "Our side of the house respects him, because he was a gentleman."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4503] him like a man!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4514] they were alluding, but, after reflecting a while, he said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4522] Mr. Hynes hesitated a little longer. Then amid the silence he took
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4524] rehearsing the piece in his mind. After a rather long pause he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4551] He dreamed (alas, 'twas but a dream!)
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4556] That smote their Lord or with a kiss
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4582] recitation there was a silence and then a burst of clapping: even
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4583] Mr. Lyons clapped. The applause continued for a little time. When
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4596] Crofton said that it was a very fine piece of writing.
[A Mother] [4598] A MOTHER
[A Mother] [4601] been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his
[A Mother] [4603] series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called
[A Mother] [4609] educated in a high-class convent, where she had learned French
[A Mother] [4615] a brilliant life. But the young men whom she met were ordinary
[A Mother] [4617] romantic desires by eating a great deal of Turkish Delight in
[A Mother] [4620] marrying Mr. Kearney, who was a bootmaker on Ormond Quay.
[A Mother] [4624] of married life, Mrs. Kearney perceived that such a man would
[A Mother] [4625] wear better than a romantic person, but she never put her own
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4629] him. At some party in a strange house when she lifted her eyebrow
[A Mother] [4631] troubled him, she put the eider-down quilt over his feet and made a
[A Mother] [4632] strong rum punch. For his part, he was a model father. By paying a
[A Mother] [4633] small sum every week into a society, he ensured for both his
[A Mother] [4634] daughters a dowry of one hundred pounds each when they came to
[A Mother] [4635] the age of twenty-four. He sent the older daughter, Kathleen, to a
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4649] went with his family to the pro-cathedral, a little crowd of people
[A Mother] [4657] music and a very nice girl and, moreover, that she was a believer
[A Mother] [4661] a series of four grand concerts which his Society was going to give
[A Mother] [4665] details of the enterprise, advised and dissuaded: and finally a
[A Mother] [4669] As Mr. Holohan was a novice in such delicate matters as the
[A Mother] [4670] wording of bills and the disposing of items for a programme, Mrs.
[A Mother] [4688] Kathleen's dress. It cost a pretty penny; but there are occasions
[A Mother] [4689] when a little expense is justifiable. She took a dozen of
[A Mother] [4698] look of things. A few young men, wearing bright blue badges in
[A Mother] [4700] dress. She passed by with her daughter and a quick glance through
[A Mother] [4707] hand. He was a little man, with a white, vacant face. She noticed
[A Mother] [4709] and that his accent was flat. He held a programme in his hand, and,
[A Mother] [4710] while he was talking to her, he chewed one end of it into a moist
[A Mother] [4722] Mrs. Kearney rewarded his very flat final syllable with a quick
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4741] expense for such a concert. There was something she didn't like in
[A Mother] [4753] jutting out his head and exchanging a laugh with two friends in the
[A Mother] [4756] committee was going to move heaven and earth to secure a
[A Mother] [4759] quickly with a glass of lemonade for a young lady and asked him
[A Mother] [4765] Mr. Holohan seemed to be in a hurry; he advised her to speak to
[A Mother] [4792] number of his talents she appreciated his abstract value as a male.
[A Mother] [4799] to begin. By ill luck it was a rainy evening. Mrs. Kearney placed
[A Mother] [4803] member of the committee in the hall and, after a great deal of
[A Mother] [4804] trouble, a steward brought out a little woman named Miss Beirne
[A Mother] [4813] The little woman hoped they would have a good house. She looked
[A Mother] [4816] gave a little sigh and said:
[A Mother] [4823] already come. The bass, Mr. Duggan, was a slender young man
[A Mother] [4824] with a scattered black moustache. He was the son of a hall porter
[A Mother] [4825] in an office in the city and, as a boy, he had sung prolonged bass
[A Mother] [4827] himself until he had become a first-rate artiste. He had appeared in
[A Mother] [4836] Bell, the second tenor, was a fair-haired little man who competed
[A Mother] [4838] been awarded a bronze medal. He was extremely nervous and
[A Mother] [4841] people know what an ordeal a concert was to him. Therefore when
[A Mother] [4854] rapidly and a pleasant noise circulated in the auditorium. She came
[A Mother] [4858] contralto. An unknown solitary woman with a pale face walked
[A Mother] [4860] blue dress which was stretched upon a meagre body. Someone said
[A Mother] [4869] Madam Glynn from London. Madam Glynn took her stand in a
[A Mother] [4870] corner of the room, holding a roll of music stiffly before her and
[A Mother] [4876] brought a breath of opulence among the company.
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4886] They went down to a discreet part of the corridor. Mrs Kearney
[A Mother] [4890] signed a contract for eight guineas and she would have to be paid.
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4915] not intended to stay a moment because concerts and artistes bored
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [4935] The two men went along some tortuous passages and up a dark
[A Mother] [4936] staircase and came to a secluded room where one of the stewards
[A Mother] [4937] was uncorking bottles for a few gentlemen. One of these
[A Mother] [4939] by instinct. He was a suave, elderly man who balanced his
[A Mother] [4940] imposing body, when at rest, upon a large silk umbrella. His
[A Mother] [4958] Mr. Holohan and Mr. O'Madden Burke came into the room In a
[A Mother] [4975] After a swift struggle of tongues Mr. Holohan hobbled out in haste.
[A Mother] [4988] The noise in the auditorium had risen to a clamour when Mr.
[A Mother] [4991] whistling. Mr. Fitzpatrick held a few banknotes in his hand. He
[A Mother] [5000] was a pause of a few seconds: and then the piano was heard.
[A Mother] [5003] Glynn's item. The poor lady sang Killarney in a bodiless gasping
[A Mother] [5009] house. Kathleen played a selection of Irish airs which was
[A Mother] [5010] generously applauded. The first part closed with a stirring patriotic
[A Mother] [5011] recitation delivered by a young lady who arranged amateur
[A Mother] [5015] All this time the dressing-room was a hive of excitement. In one
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[A Mother] [5058] hand or a foot she won't put on that platform."
[A Mother] [5073] be paid I can't get a civil answer."
[A Mother] [5075] She tossed her head and assumed a haughty voice:
[A Mother] [5077] "You must speak to the secretary. It's not my business. I'm a great
[A Mother] [5080] "I thought you were a lady," said Mr. Holohan, walking away from
[A Mother] [5095] "Get a cab!"
[A Mother] [5109] "That's a nice lady!" he said. "O, she's a nice lady!"
[Grace] [5119] him over. His hat had rolled a few yards away and his clothes were
[Grace] [5121] face downwards. His eyes were closed and he breathed with a
[Grace] [5122] grunting noise. A thin stream of blood trickled from the corner of
[Grace] [5127] minutes he was surrounded by a ring of men. The manager of the
[Grace] [5130] gentleman with a small rum.
[Grace] [5138] No one knew; a voice said:
[Grace] [5142] The ring of onlookers distended and closed again elastically. A
[Grace] [5145] man's face, sent for a policeman.
[Grace] [5149] who had carried him upstairs held a dinged silk hat in his hand.
[Grace] [5152] opened and an immense constable entered. A crowd which had
[Grace] [5157] a young man with thick immobile features, listened. He moved his
[Grace] [5160] he drew off his glove, produced a small book from his waist,
[Grace] [5162] a suspicious provincial accent:
[Grace] [5166] A young man in a cycling-suit cleared his way through the ring of
[Grace] [5171] authoritative voice until a curate came running with the glass. The
[Grace] [5172] brandy was forced down the man's throat. In a few seconds he
[Grace] [5180] He was helped to his feet. The manager said something about a
[Grace] [5188] only a little accident. He spoke very thickly.
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5193] being debated a tall agile gentleman of fair complexion, wearing a
[Grace] [5224] "'ant we have a little...?"
[Grace] [5232] to the counter and a curate set about removing the traces of blood
[Grace] [5248] have a little drink together.
[Grace] [5253] Ballast Office the clock showed half-past nine. A keen east wind
[Grace] [5263] Kernan's mouth but he could not see. He struck a match and,
[Grace] [5267] lower teeth and gums were covered with clotted blood and a
[Grace] [5276] Mr. Kernan was a commercial traveller of the old school which
[Grace] [5278] city without a silk hat of some decency and a pair of gaiters. By
[Grace] [5279] grace of these two articles of clothing, he said, a man could always
[Grace] [5283] to allow him a little office in Crowe Street, on the window blind of
[Grace] [5285] E. C. On the mantelpiece of this little office a little leaden
[Grace] [5288] full of a black liquid. From these bowls Mr. Kernan tasted tea. He
[Grace] [5289] took a mouthful, drew it up, saturated his palate with it and then
[Grace] [5292] Mr. Power, a much younger man, was employed in the Royal Irish
[Grace] [5296] known him at his highest point of success still esteemed him as a
[Grace] [5298] debts were a byword in his circle; he was a debonair young man.
[Grace] [5300] The car halted before a small house on the Glasnevin road and Mr.
[Grace] [5304] two girls and a boy, conscious of their father helplessness and of
[Grace] [5307] thoughtful. After a while Mrs. Kernan entered the kitchen,
[Grace] [5310] "Such a sight! O, he'll do for himself one day and that's the holy
[Grace] [5319] "O, you needn't tell me that, Mr. Power. I know you're a friend of
[Grace] [5328] offer you. But if you wait a minute I'll send round to Fogarty's, at
[Grace] [5334] never seems to think he has a home at all."
[Grace] [5337] a new leaf. I'll talk to Martin. He's the man. We'll come here one of
[Grace] [5349] "We'll make a new man of him," he said. "Good-night, Mrs.
[Grace] [5365] to her a not ungallant figure: and she still hurried to the chapel
[Grace] [5366] door whenever a wedding was reported and, seeing the bridal pair,
[Grace] [5368] the Sea Church in Sandymount, leaning on the arm of a jovial
[Grace] [5369] well-fed man, who was dressed smartly in a frock-coat and
[Grace] [5370] lavender trousers and carried a silk hat gracefully balanced upon
[Grace] [5371] his other arm. After three weeks she had found a wife's life
[Grace] [5373] unbearable, she had become a mother. The part of mother
[Grace] [5376] sons were launched. One was in a draper's shop in Glasgow and
[Grace] [5377] the other was clerk to a tea- merchant in Belfast. They were good
[Grace] [5381] Mr. Kernan sent a letter to his office next day and remained in bed.
[Grace] [5384] dutifully whenever he was sick and always tried to make him eat a
[Grace] [5387] the end of Thomas Street and back again to book even a small
[Grace] [5391] to his bedroom, the air of which was impregnated with a personal
[Grace] [5397] disorder of the room, but at the same time looked at them a little
[Grace] [5398] proudly, with a veteran's pride.
[Grace] [5400] He was quite unconscious that he was the victim of a plot which
[Grace] [5409] Mr. Cunningham was the very man for such a case. He was an
[Grace] [5416] Everyone had respect for poor Martin Cunningham. He was a
[Grace] [5428] After a quarter of a century of married life, she had very few
[Grace] [5429] illusions left. Religion for her was a habit, and she suspected that a
[Grace] [5431] She was tempted to see a curious appropriateness in his accident
[Grace] [5434] being shortened. However, Mr. Cunningham was a capable man;
[Grace] [5443] that he had once known a similar case. A man of seventy had
[Grace] [5444] bitten off a piece of his tongue during an epileptic fit and the
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5454] Mr. M'Coy had been at one time a tenor of some reputation. His
[Grace] [5455] wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play
[Grace] [5458] driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland
[Grace] [5459] Railway, a canvasser for advertisements for The Irish Times and
[Grace] [5460] for The Freeman's Journal, a town traveller for a coal firm on
[Grace] [5461] commission, a private inquiry agent, a clerk in the office of the
[Grace] [5494] "A chap. I don't know his name. Damn it now, what's his name?
[Grace] [5505] this case the monosyllable had a moral intention. Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5506] sometimes formed one of a little detachment which left the city
[Grace] [5513] the partner of a very fat, short gentleman, Mr. Goldberg, in the
[Grace] [5533] "That was a decent young chap, that medical fellow," he said.
[Grace] [5536] "O, only for him," said Mr. Power, "it might have been a case of
[Grace] [5537] seven days, without the option of a fine."
[Grace] [5540] there was a policeman. Decent young fellow, he seemed. How did
[Grace] [5552] made a crusade in search of valises and portmanteaus to enable
[Grace] [5566] Mr. Cunningham laughed. He was a Castle official only during
[Grace] [5571] He assumed a thick, provincial accent and said in a tone of
[Grace] [5582] you know, to drill. The sergeant makes them stand in a row against
[Grace] [5587] "At dinner, you know. Then he has a bloody big bowl of cabbage
[Grace] [5588] before him on the table and a bloody big spoon like a shovel. He
[Grace] [5589] takes up a wad of cabbage on the spoon and pegs it across the
[Grace] [5594] still. He talked of writing a letter to the papers.
[Grace] [5599] Mr. Cunningham gave a qualified assent.
[Grace] [5610] Mrs. Kernan entered the room and, placing a tray on the table,
[Grace] [5617] exchanged a nod with Mr. Cunningham behind Mr. Power's back,
[Grace] [5628] He assumed such a comical face and voice that the distribution of
[Grace] [5653] There was a short silence. Mr. Kernan waited to see whether he
[Grace] [5658] "O, it's nothing," said Mr. Cunningham. "It's only a little matter
[Grace] [5663] "No, no," said Mr. Cunningham in an evasive tone, "it's just a
[Grace] [5670] "To tell you the truth, Tom, we're going to make a retreat."
[Grace] [5675] He uttered the metaphor with a certain homely energy and,
[Grace] [5678] "You see, we may as well all admit we're a nice collection of
[Grace] [5688] A thought seemed to strike him. He turned suddenly to the invalid
[Grace] [5692] and we'd have a four-handed reel."
[Grace] [5699] to his dignity to show a stiff neck. He took no part in the
[Grace] [5700] conversation for a long while, but listened, with an air of calm
[Grace] [5703] "I haven't such a bad opinion of the Jesuits," he said, intervening at
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5711] well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit. They're the boyos
[Grace] [5712] have influence. I'll tell you a case in point...."
[Grace] [5714] "The Jesuits are a fine body of men," said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5716] "It's a curious thing," said Mr. Cunningham, "about the Jesuit
[Grace] [5723] "That's a fact," said Mr. Cunningham. "That's history."
[Grace] [5732] "Yes," said Mr. Kernan. "That's why I have a feeling for them. It's
[Grace] [5746] world all this time and seen most sides of it without being a judge
[Grace] [5751] impressed. He had a high opinion of Mr. Cunningham as a judge
[Grace] [5752] of character and as a reader of faces. He asked for particulars.
[Grace] [5754] "O, it's just a retreat, you know," said Mr. Cunningham. "Father
[Grace] [5762] "Fine, jolly fellow! He's a man of the world like ourselves."
[Grace] [5768] "And tell me, Martin.... Is he a good preacher?"
[Grace] [5770] "Munno.... It's not exactly a sermon, you know. It's just kind of a
[Grace] [5771] friendly talk, you know, in a common-sense way."
[Grace] [5777] "O, Father Tom Burke," said Mr. Cunningham, "that was a born
[Grace] [5783] "And yet they say he wasn't much of a theologian," said Mr
[Grace] [5791] "Ah!... he was a splendid man," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5802] hadn't he a voice! The Prisoner of the Vatican, he called him. I
[Grace] [5807] "'Course he is," said Mr. Kernan, "and a damned decent
[Grace] [5813] "There's a good deal in that," said Mr. Power. "There used always
[Grace] [5821] He hesitated for a moment.
[Grace] [5829] "Not a doubt of it," said Mr. Kernan warmly.
[Grace] [5833] "Here's a visitor for you!"
[Grace] [5841] A pale, oval face came forward into the light. The arch of its fair
[Grace] [5843] pleasantly astonished eyes. Mr. Fogarty was a modest grocer. He
[Grace] [5844] had failed in business in a licensed house in the city because his
[Grace] [5846] second-class distillers and brewers. He had opened a small shop on
[Grace] [5849] with a certain grace, complimented little children and spoke with a
[Grace] [5852] Mr. Fogarty brought a gift with him, a half-pint of special whisky.
[Grace] [5856] a small account for groceries unsettled between him and Mr.
[Grace] [5863] enlivened the conversation. Mr. Fogarty, sitting on a small area of
[Grace] [5888] "Pope Leo, you know, was a great scholar and a poet."
[Grace] [5890] "He had a strong face," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5897] a double intention, saying:
[Grace] [5902] M'Coy's example, "when we went to the penny-a-week school."
[Grace] [5904] "There was many a good man went to the penny-a-week school
[Grace] [5905] with a sod of turf under his oxter," said Mr. Kernan sententiously.
[Grace] [5941] There was a silence. Mr. Cunningham said
[Grace] [5945] out-and-out ruffian, not one of them ever preached ex cathedra a
[Grace] [5959] others to a little more. Mr. M'Coy, seeing that there was not
[Grace] [5980] "And they were a German cardinal by the name of Dolling... or
[Grace] [5983] "Dowling was no German, and that's a sure five," said Mr. Power,
[Grace] [6002] infallibility a dogma of the Church ex cathedra. On the very
[Grace] [6004] it, stood up and shouted out with the voice of a lion: 'Credo!'"
[Grace] [6018] Kernan came into the room, drying her hands she came into a
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6041] properly taped, my lad. He had an eye like a hawk."
[Grace] [6045] There was a pause again. Mr. Power turned to Mrs. Kernan and
[Grace] [6048] "Well, Mrs. Kernan, we're going to make your man here a good
[Grace] [6053] "We're all going to make a retreat together and confess our sins--
[Grace] [6056] "I don't mind," said Mr. Kernan, smiling a little nervously.
[Grace] [6066] I'll just tell him my little tale of woe. I'm not such a bad fellow----"
[Grace] [6076] Mr. Power said nothing. He felt completely out-generalled. But a
[Grace] [6085] "What?" said Mr. Kernan. "Must I have a candle?"
[Grace] [6104] "There's a nice Catholic for you!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6129] unsuccessfully to find a place in the bench with the others, and,
[Grace] [6130] when the party had settled down in the form of a quincunx, he had
[Grace] [6134] stimulus. In a whisper, Mr. Cunningham drew Mr. Kernan's
[Grace] [6143] Kernan's, who had been at one time a considerable commercial
[Grace] [6150] A powerful-looking figure, the upper part of which was draped
[Grace] [6151] with a white surplice, was observed to be struggling into the pulpit.
[Grace] [6155] upright in the pulpit, two-thirds of its bulk, crowned by a massive
[Grace] [6174] interpret properly. It was a text which might seem to the casual
[Grace] [6179] manner of worldlings. It was a text for business men and
[Grace] [6183] forced to live in the world, and, to a certain extent, for the world:
[Grace] [6184] and in this sentence He designed to give them a word of counsel,
[Grace] [6190] no extravagant purpose; but as a man of the world speaking to his
[Grace] [6192] speak to them in a businesslike way. If he might use the metaphor,
[Grace] [6197] Jesus Christ was not a hard taskmaster. He understood our little
[Grace] [6208] the truth, to be frank and say like a man:
[The Dead] [6223] upstairs into a ladies' dressing-room. Miss Kate and Miss Julia
[The Dead] [6228] It was always a great affair, the Misses Morkan's annual dance.
[The Dead] [6238] corn-factor on the ground floor. That was a good thirty years ago if
[The Dead] [6239] it was a day. Mary Jane, who was then a little girl in short clothes,
[The Dead] [6241] Haddington Road. She had been through the Academy and gave a
[The Dead] [6252] seldom made a mistake in the orders, so that she got on well with
[The Dead] [6256] Of course, they had good reason to be fussy on such a night. And
[The Dead] [6287] went upstairs, laughing, to the ladies' dressing-room. A light fringe
[The Dead] [6288] of snow lay like a cape on the shoulders of his overcoat and like
[The Dead] [6290] overcoat slipped with a squeaking noise through the
[The Dead] [6291] snow-stiffened frieze, a cold, fragrant air from out-of-doors
[The Dead] [6298] surname and glanced at her. She was a slim; growing girl, pale in
[The Dead] [6300] made her look still paler. Gabriel had known her when she was a
[The Dead] [6301] child and used to sit on the lowest step nursing a rag doll.
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6306] stamping and shuffling of feet on the floor above, listened for a
[The Dead] [6308] his overcoat carefully at the end of a shelf.
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6324] Gabriel coloured, as if he felt he had made a mistake and, without
[The Dead] [6328] He was a stout, tallish young man. The high colour of his cheeks
[The Dead] [6329] pushed upwards even to his forehead, where it scattered itself in a
[The Dead] [6333] glossy black hair was parted in the middle and brushed in a long
[The Dead] [6339] a coin rapidly from his pocket.
[The Dead] [6342] isn't it? Just... here's a little...."
[The Dead] [6359] sudden retort. It had cast a gloom over him which he tried to dispel
[The Dead] [6361] his waistcoat pocket a little paper and glanced at the headings he
[The Dead] [6371] had failed with the girl in the pantry. He had taken up a wrong
[The Dead] [6372] tone. His whole speech was a mistake from first to last, an utter
[The Dead] [6381] appearance of a woman who did not know where she was or where
[The Dead] [6383] than her sister's, was all puckers and creases, like a shrivelled red
[The Dead] [6391] "Gretta tells me you're not going to take a cab back to Monkstown
[The Dead] [6395] that last year, hadn't we? Don't you remember, Aunt Kate, what a
[The Dead] [6398] Gretta caught a dreadful cold."
[The Dead] [6416] She broke out into a peal of laughter and glanced at her husband,
[The Dead] [6419] Gabriel's solicitude was a standing joke with them.
[The Dead] [6424] a diving suit."
[The Dead] [6429] mirthless eyes were directed towards her nephew's face. After a
[The Dead] [6438] "Yes," said Mrs. Conroy. "Guttapercha things. We both have a pair
[The Dead] [6461] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate again. "What a comfort it is to have a
[The Dead] [6478] At the same moment a clapping of hands and a final flourish of the
[The Dead] [6483] "Slip down, Gabriel, like a good fellow and see if he's all right, and
[The Dead] [6491] "It's such a relief," said Aunt Kate to Mrs. Conroy, "that Gabriel is
[The Dead] [6496] A tall wizen-faced man, with a stiff grizzled moustache and
[The Dead] [6513] straightening and smoothing a large cloth. On the sideboard were
[The Dead] [6516] a sideboard for viands and sweets. At a smaller sideboard in one
[The Dead] [6523] taking hold of the decanter, filled out for himself a goodly measure
[The Dead] [6524] of whisky. The young men eyed him respectfully while he took a
[The Dead] [6529] His wizened face broke into a broader smile, and the three young
[The Dead] [6544] His hot face had leaned forward a little too confidentially and he
[The Dead] [6545] had assumed a very low Dublin accent so that the young ladies,
[The Dead] [6552] A red-faced young woman, dressed in pansy, came into the room,
[The Dead] [6562] Kerrigan, will you take Miss Power? Miss Furlong, may I get you a
[The Dead] [6575] "But I've a nice partner for you, Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor. I'll
[The Dead] [6588] Julia, who was carrying in a column of table-napkins, turned to her
[The Dead] [6594] Malins across the landing. The latter, a young man of about forty,
[The Dead] [6598] coarse features, a blunt nose, a convex and receding brow, tumid
[The Dead] [6600] scanty hair made him look sleepy. He was laughing heartily in a
[The Dead] [6601] high key at a story which he had been telling Gabriel on the stairs
[The Dead] [6620] "Now, isn't he a terrible fellow!" she said. "And his poor mother
[The Dead] [6629] "Now, then, Teddy, I'm going to fill you out a good glass of
[The Dead] [6634] Malins' attention to a disarray in his dress, filled out and handed
[The Dead] [6635] him a full glass of lemonade. Freddy Malins' left hand accepted the
[The Dead] [6638] was once more wrinkling with mirth, poured out for himself a
[The Dead] [6640] reached the climax of his story, in a kink of high-pitched
[The Dead] [6653] piano, had gone away quietly in couples after a few minutes. The
[The Dead] [6656] the pauses like those of a priestess in momentary imprecation, and
[The Dead] [6661] A picture of the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet hung there and
[The Dead] [6662] beside it was a picture of the two murdered princes in the Tower
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6666] for him as a birthday present a waistcoat of purple tabinet, with
[The Dead] [6670] of the Morkan family. Both she and Julia had always seemed a
[The Dead] [6673] was pointing out something in it to Constantine who, dressed in a
[The Dead] [6678] in the Royal University. A shadow passed over his face as he
[The Dead] [6688] down in his heart. The piece ended with a trill of octaves in the
[The Dead] [6689] treble and a final deep octave in the bass. Great applause greeted
[The Dead] [6697] Ivors. She was a frank-mannered talkative young lady, with a
[The Dead] [6698] freckled face and prominent brown eyes. She did not wear a
[The Dead] [6704] "I have a crow to pluck with you."
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6726] A look of perplexity appeared on Gabriel's face. It was true that he
[The Dead] [6727] wrote a literary column every Wednesday in The Daily Express,
[The Dead] [6729] a West Briton surely. The books he received for review were
[The Dead] [6739] teachers: he could not risk a grandiose phrase with her. He
[The Dead] [6744] inattentive. Miss Ivors promptly took his hand in a warm grasp and
[The Dead] [6745] said in a soft friendly tone:
[The Dead] [6750] question and Gabriel felt more at ease. A friend of hers had shown
[The Dead] [6756] this summer? We're going to stay there a whole month. It will be
[The Dead] [6771] "Well, you know, every year I go for a cycling tour with some
[The Dead] [6783] languages and partly for a change."
[The Dead] [6793] humour under the ordeal which was making a blush invade his
[The Dead] [6815] great energy. He avoided her eyes for he had seen a sour
[The Dead] [6818] from under her brows for a moment quizzically until he smiled.
[The Dead] [6824] When the lancers were over Gabriel went away to a remote corner
[The Dead] [6825] of the room where Freddy Malins' mother was sitting. She was a
[The Dead] [6826] stout feeble old woman with white hair. Her voice had a catch in it
[The Dead] [6829] her whether she had had a good crossing. She lived with her
[The Dead] [6830] married daughter in Glasgow and came to Dublin on a visit once a
[The Dead] [6831] year. She answered placidly that she had had a beautiful crossing
[The Dead] [6837] was an enthusiast but there was a time for all things. Perhaps he
[The Dead] [6839] call him a West Briton before people, even in joke. She had tried
[The Dead] [6865] go for a trip to the west of Ireland and I said I wouldn't."
[The Dead] [6867] His wife clasped her hands excitedly and gave a little jump.
[The Dead] [6873] She looked at him for a moment, then turned to Mrs. Malins and
[The Dead] [6876] "There's a nice husband for you, Mrs. Malins."
[The Dead] [6882] they used to go fishing. Her son-in-law was a splendid fisher. One
[The Dead] [6883] day he caught a beautiful big fish and the man in the hotel cooked
[The Dead] [6897] lying on the branches of the trees and forming a bright cap on the
[The Dead] [6903] He repeated to himself a phrase he had written in his review: "One
[The Dead] [6904] feels that one is listening to a thought- tormented music." Miss
[The Dead] [6920] A murmur in the room attracted his attention. Mr. Browne was
[The Dead] [6934] from the invisible supper-table. It sounded so genuine that a little
[The Dead] [6955] near him in the manner of a showman introducing a prodigy to an
[The Dead] [6963] "Well, Browne, if you're serious you might make a worse
[The Dead] [6972] "Thirty years ago I hadn't a bad voice as voices go."
[The Dead] [6978] She turned as if to appeal to the good sense of the others against a
[The Dead] [6979] refractory child while Aunt Julia gazed in front of her, a vague
[The Dead] [6998] She had worked herself into a passion and would have continued
[The Dead] [6999] in defence of her sister for it was a sore subject with her but Mary
[The Dead] [7009] "O, I don't question the pope's being right. I'm only a stupid old
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7011] a thing as common everyday politeness and gratitude. And if I
[The Dead] [7033] "To take a pick itself," said Mary Jane, "after all your dancing."
[The Dead] [7047] Gabriel hesitated a moment and said:
[The Dead] [7060] "Beannacht libh," cried Miss Ivors, with a laugh, as she ran down
[The Dead] [7063] Mary Jane gazed after her, a moody puzzled expression on her
[The Dead] [7077] "ready to carve a flock of geese, if necessary."
[The Dead] [7079] A fat brown goose lay at one end of the table and at the other end,
[The Dead] [7080] on a bed of creased paper strewn with sprigs of parsley, lay a great
[The Dead] [7082] crumbs, a neat paper frill round its shin and beside this was a
[The Dead] [7084] side-dishes: two little minsters of jelly, red and yellow; a shallow
[The Dead] [7085] dish full of blocks of blancmange and red jam, a large green
[The Dead] [7086] leaf-shaped dish with a stalk-shaped handle, on which lay bunches
[The Dead] [7087] of purple raisins and peeled almonds, a companion dish on which
[The Dead] [7088] lay a solid rectangle of Smyrna figs, a dish of custard topped with
[The Dead] [7089] grated nutmeg, a small bowl full of chocolates and sweets wrapped
[The Dead] [7090] in gold and silver papers and a glass vase in which stood some tall
[The Dead] [7091] celery stalks. In the centre of the table there stood, as sentries to a
[The Dead] [7092] fruit-stand which upheld a pyramid of oranges and American
[The Dead] [7095] piano a pudding in a huge yellow dish lay in waiting and behind it
[The Dead] [7104] liked nothing better than to find himself at the head of a well-laden
[The Dead] [7107] "Miss Furlong, what shall I send you?" he asked. "A wing or a slice
[The Dead] [7110] "Just a small slice of the breast."
[The Dead] [7117] of ham and spiced beef Lily went from guest to guest with a dish
[The Dead] [7118] of hot floury potatoes wrapped in a white napkin. This was Mary
[The Dead] [7125] gentlemen and bottles of minerals for the ladies. There was a great
[The Dead] [7130] so that he compromised by taking a long draught of stout for he
[The Dead] [7142] "Now, if anyone wants a little more of what vulgar people call
[The Dead] [7145] A chorus of voices invited him to begin his own supper and Lily
[The Dead] [7149] draught, "kindly forget my existence, ladies and gentlemen, for a
[The Dead] [7155] Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor, a dark- complexioned young man
[The Dead] [7156] with a smart moustache, praised very highly the leading contralto
[The Dead] [7157] of the company but Miss Furlong thought she had a rather vulgar
[The Dead] [7158] style of production. Freddy Malins said there was a Negro
[The Dead] [7168] your opinion of him. I think he has a grand voice."
[The Dead] [7173] "And why couldn't he have a voice too?" asked Freddy Malins
[The Dead] [7174] sharply. "Is it because he's only a black?"
[The Dead] [7177] to the legitimate opera. One of her pupils had given her a pass for
[The Dead] [7186] like a Soldier fall, introducing a high C every time, and of how the
[The Dead] [7208] "For me," said Aunt Kate, who had been picking a bone, "there
[The Dead] [7216] was ever put into a man's throat."
[The Dead] [7223] "A beautiful, pure, sweet, mellow English tenor," said Aunt Kate
[The Dead] [7240] had been left for him. Freddy Malins also took a stalk of celery and
[The Dead] [7241] ate it with his pudding. He had been told that celery was a capital
[The Dead] [7244] son was going down to Mount Melleray in a week or so. The table
[The Dead] [7247] for a penny-piece from their guests.
[The Dead] [7250] a chap can go down there and put up there as if it were a hotel and
[The Dead] [7274] "I like that idea very much but wouldn't a comfortable spring bed
[The Dead] [7275] do them as well as a coffin?"
[The Dead] [7279] As the subject had grown lugubrious it was buried in a silence of
[The Dead] [7291] being filled the conversation ceased. A pause followed, broken
[The Dead] [7294] coughed once or twice and then a few gentlemen patted the table
[The Dead] [7295] gently as a signal for silence. The silence came and Gabriel pushed
[The Dead] [7300] tablecloth and smiled nervously at the company. Meeting a row of
[The Dead] [7302] playing a waltz tune and he could hear the skirts sweeping against
[The Dead] [7307] Wellington Monument wore a gleaming cap of snow that flashed
[The Dead] [7314] "It has fallen to my lot this evening, as in years past, to perform a
[The Dead] [7315] very pleasing task but a task for which I am afraid my poor powers
[The Dead] [7316] as a speaker are all too inadequate."
[The Dead] [7321] will for the deed and to lend me your attention for a few moments
[The Dead] [7331] He made a circle in the air with his arm and paused. Everyone
[The Dead] [7337] guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is
[The Dead] [7338] unique as far as my experience goes (and I have visited not a few
[The Dead] [7340] perhaps, that with us it is rather a failing than anything to be
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7345] many and many a long year to come--the tradition of genuine
[The Dead] [7350] A hearty murmur of assent ran round the table. It shot through
[The Dead] [7356] "A new generation is growing up in our midst, a generation
[The Dead] [7360] a sceptical and, if I may use the phrase, a thought-tormented age:
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7375] "But yet," continued Gabriel, his voice falling into a softer
[The Dead] [7387] together for a brief moment from the bustle and rush of our
[The Dead] [7389] good-fellowship, as colleagues, also to a certain extent, in the true
[The Dead] [7408] herself, whose good heart, whose too good heart, has become a
[The Dead] [7410] gifted with perennial youth and whose singing must have been a
[The Dead] [7411] surprise and a revelation to us all tonight, or, last but not least,
[The Dead] [7420] every member of the company fingered a glass expectantly, and
[The Dead] [7442] Unless he tells a lie,
[The Dead] [7443] Unless he tells a lie,
[The Dead] [7486] dressed in a long green overcoat with mock astrakhan cuffs and
[The Dead] [7509] Mary Jane glanced at Gabriel and Mr. Browne and said with a
[The Dead] [7516] a rattling fine walk in the country or a fast drive with a good
[The Dead] [7519] "We used to have a very good horse and trap at home," said Aunt
[The Dead] [7530] gentleman, was a glue-boiler."
[The Dead] [7532] "O, now, Gabriel," said Aunt Kate, laughing, "he had a starch
[The Dead] [7535] "Well, glue or starch," said Gabriel, "the old gentleman had a horse
[The Dead] [7540] out with the quality to a military review in the park."
[The Dead] [7563] Gabriel paced in a circle round the hall in his goloshes amid the
[The Dead] [7567] who was a very pompous old gentleman, was highly indignant. 'Go
[The Dead] [7572] incident was interrupted by a resounding knock at the hall door.
[The Dead] [7586] Malins clambered in after her and spent a long time settling her on
[The Dead] [7589] cab. There was a good deal of confused talk, and then Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [7593] Browne, each of whom had his head out through a window of the
[The Dead] [7614] "Make like a bird for Trinity College."
[The Dead] [7619] amid a chorus of laughter and adieus.
[The Dead] [7621] Gabriel had not gone to the door with the others. He was in a dark
[The Dead] [7622] part of the hall gazing up the staircase. A woman was standing
[The Dead] [7629] on the front steps, a few chords struck on the piano and a few
[The Dead] [7630] notes of a man's voice singing.
[The Dead] [7634] and mystery in her attitude as if she were a symbol of something.
[The Dead] [7635] He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the
[The Dead] [7636] shadow, listening to distant music, a symbol of. If he were a
[The Dead] [7640] would call the picture if he were a painter.
[The Dead] [7661] wouldn't sing all the night. O, I'll get him to sing a song before he
[The Dead] [7670] "O, what a pity!" she cried. "Is he coming down, Gretta?"
[The Dead] [7673] them. A few steps behind her were Mr. Bartell D'Arcy and Miss
[The Dead] [7680] Mrs. Conroy, too, and he told us he had a dreadful cold and
[The Dead] [7683] "O, Mr. D'Arcy," said Aunt Kate, "now that was a great fib to tell."
[The Dead] [7685] "Can't you see that I'm as hoarse as a crow?" said Mr. D'Arcy
[The Dead] [7694] "It's the weather," said Aunt Julia, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7711] in a repentant tone told them the history of his cold. Everyone gave
[The Dead] [7712] him advice and said it was a great pity and urged him to be very
[The Dead] [7716] hair, which he had seen her drying at the fire a few days before.
[The Dead] [7719] colour on her cheeks and that her eyes were shining. A sudden tide
[The Dead] [7731] "It's a very nice air," said Mary Jane. "I'm sorry you were not in
[The Dead] [7760] The morning was still dark. A dull, yellow light brooded over the
[The Dead] [7769] in a brown parcel tucked under one arm and her hands holding her
[The Dead] [7780] burst like stars upon his memory. A heliotrope envelope was lying
[The Dead] [7784] They were standing on the crowded platform and he was placing a
[The Dead] [7786] in the cold, looking in through a grated window at a man making
[The Dead] [7787] bottles in a roaring furnace. It was very cold. Her face, fragrant in
[The Dead] [7796] A wave of yet more tender joy escaped from his heart and went
[The Dead] [7821] At the corner of Winetavern Street they met a cab. He was glad of
[The Dead] [7824] only a few words, pointing out some building or street. The horse
[The Dead] [7826] old rattling box after his heels, and Gabriel was again in a cab with
[The Dead] [7831] "They say you never cross O'Connell Bridge without seeing a
[The Dead] [7834] "I see a white man this time," said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7845] man a shilling over his fare. The man saluted and said:
[The Dead] [7847] "A prosperous New Year to you, sir."
[The Dead] [7851] She leaned for a moment on his arm in getting out of the cab and
[The Dead] [7854] with him a few hours before. He had felt proud and happy then,
[The Dead] [7857] of her body, musical and strange and perfumed, sent through him a
[The Dead] [7861] and friends and run away together with wild and radiant hearts to a
[The Dead] [7864] An old man was dozing in a great hooded chair in the hall. He lit a
[The Dead] [7868] her head bowed in the ascent, her frail shoulders curved as with a
[The Dead] [7878] The porter led them along a corridor and opened a door. Then he
[The Dead] [7879] set his unstable candle down on a toilet-table and asked at what
[The Dead] [7884] The porter pointed to the tap of the electric-light and began a
[The Dead] [7889] that handsome article, like a good man."
[The Dead] [7892] surprised by such a novel idea. Then he mumbled good-night and
[The Dead] [7895] A ghastly light from the street lamp lay in a long shaft from one
[The Dead] [7896] window to the door. Gabriel threw his overcoat and hat on a couch
[The Dead] [7898] the street in order that his emotion might calm a little. Then he
[The Dead] [7899] turned and leaned against a chest of drawers with his back to the
[The Dead] [7901] a large swinging mirror, unhooking her waist. Gabriel paused for a
[The Dead] [7913] "I am a little," she answered.
[The Dead] [7931] "Well, poor fellow, he's a decent sort of chap, after all," continued
[The Dead] [7932] Gabriel in a false voice. "He gave me back that sovereign I lent
[The Dead] [7933] him, and I didn't expect it, really. It's a pity he wouldn't keep away
[The Dead] [7934] from that Browne, because he's not a bad fellow, really."
[The Dead] [7943] "When did you lend him the pound?" she asked, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7953] He was in such a fever of rage and desire that he did not hear her
[The Dead] [7958] "You are a very generous person, Gabriel," she said.
[The Dead] [7988] arms across the bed-rail, hid her face. Gabriel stood stockstill for a
[The Dead] [7992] always puzzled him when he saw it in a mirror, and his
[The Dead] [7993] glimmering gilt-rimmed eyeglasses. He halted a few paces from
[The Dead] [7999] back of her hand like a child. A kinder note than he had intended
[The Dead] [8004] "I am thinking about a person long ago who used to sing that
[The Dead] [8009] "It was a person I used to know in Galway when I was living with
[The Dead] [8012] The smile passed away from Gabriel's face. A dull anger began to
[The Dead] [8018] "It was a young boy I used to know," she answered, "named
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8034] A thought flew across Gabriel's mind.
[The Dead] [8052] seventeen. Isn't it a terrible thing to die so young as that?"
[The Dead] [8059] evocation of this figure from the dead, a boy in the gasworks.
[The Dead] [8062] in her mind with another. A shameful consciousness of his own
[The Dead]