Dubliners by James Joyce
about

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 129 occurrences of the word:   about

[The Sisters] [23] queer... there was something uncanny about him. I'll tell you my
[The Sisters] [29] tired of him and his endless stories about the distillery.
[The Sisters] [31] "I have my own theory about it," he said. "I think it was one of
[The Sisters] [66] let a young lad run about and play with young lads of his own age
[The Sisters] [127] do this without spilling half the snuff about the floor. Even as he
[The Sisters] [145] properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about
[The Sisters] [264] about to fall asleep.
[The Sisters] [269] about the Mass in the chapel. Only for Father O'Rourke I don't
[The Sisters] [310] carriages that makes no noise that Father O'Rourke told him about,
[The Sisters] [345] himself, talking to no one and wandering about by himself. So one
[An Encounter] [495] We came then near the river. We spent a long time walking about
[An Encounter] [559] for perhaps fifty paces he turned about and began to retrace his
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [606] accent was good. He began to speak to us about girls, saying what
[An Encounter] [646] about the far end of the field, aimlessly.
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[Araby] [755] street-singers, who sang a come-all-you about O'Donovan Rossa,
[Araby] [756] or a ballad about the troubles in our native land. These noises
[Araby] [774] to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip
[Araby] [868] his Steed. When I left the kitchen he was about to recite the
[Araby] [892] gathered about the stalls which were still open. Before a curtain,
[Eveline] [981] her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the
[Eveline] [1011] give her his hard-earned money to throw about the streets, and
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1024] She was about to explore another life with Frank. Frank was very
[Eveline] [1036] People knew that they were courting and, when he sang about the
[Eveline] [1095] saying something about the passage over and over again. The
[Eveline] [1112] All the seas of the world tumbled about her heart. He was drawing
[After the Race] [1152] orders in advance (he was about to start a motor establishment in
[After the Race] [1161] He was about twenty-six years of age, with a soft, light brown
[After the Race] [1212] much more so now when he was about to stake the greater part of
[After the Race] [1270] Hungarian was about to prevail in ridicule of the spurious lutes of
[After the Race] [1293] very well what the talk was about. Villona and Riviere were the
[Two Gallants] [1452] he was about town. Whenever any job was vacant a friend was
[Two Gallants] [1457] companions. His conversation was mainly about himself what he
[Two Gallants] [1573] His harp, too, heedless that her coverings had fallen about her
[Two Gallants] [1642] passed Lenehan took off his cap and, after about ten seconds,
[Two Gallants] [1654] Donnybrook tram; then he turned about and went back the way he
[Two Gallants] [1710] of knocking about, of pulling the devil by the tail, of shifts and
[A Little Cloud] [2173] as he walked boldly forward, the silence that was spread about his
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2236] better still: T. Malone Chandler. He would speak to Gallaher about
[A Little Cloud] [2245] moments. He looked about him, but his sight was confused by the
[A Little Cloud] [2312] want to knock about a bit in the world. Have you never been
[A Little Cloud] [2324] "I should think I have! I've knocked about there a little."
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2415] a story about an English duchess--a story which he knew to be
[A Little Cloud] [2427] nature.... But tell me something about yourself. Hogan told me you
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2564] When I go about a thing I mean business, I tell you. You just wait."
[A Little Cloud] [2619] them, no rapture. He thought of what Gallaher had said about rich
[A Little Cloud] [2646] He paused. He felt the rhythm of the verse about him in the room.
[Counterparts] [2894] missing. The man answered that he knew nothing about them, that
[Counterparts] [2899] "I know nothing about any other two letters," he said stupidly.
[Counterparts] [3057] about feats of strength. Weathers was showing his biceps muscle
[Counterparts] [3067] The trial began. After about thirty seconds Weathers brought his
[Counterparts] [3089] "What the hell do you know about it?" said Farrington fiercely,
[Counterparts] [3166] boy looked about him wildly but, seeing no way of escape, fell
[Clay] [3311] chat with her about Hallow Eve and the rainy weather. He
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3389] about here and there in the air and descended on one of the
[Clay] [3393] whispering. Somebody said something about the garden, and at
[A Painful Case] [3478] time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in
[A Painful Case] [3490] about the outskirts of the city. His liking for Mozart's music
[A Painful Case] [3575] warm soil about an exotic. Many times she allowed the dark to fall
[A Painful Case] [3620] One evening as he was about to put a morsel of corned beef and
[A Painful Case] [3664] P. Dunne, railway porter, stated that as the train was about to start
[A Painful Case] [3700] for twenty-two years and had lived happily until about two years
[A Painful Case] [3736] had deceived himself so utterly about her? He remembered her
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3870] goes boosing about. I tried to make him someway decent."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3918] after stumbling about the room returned with two candlesticks
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3936] "I hope he'll look smart about it if he means business," said Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4109] fellow sponging. Couldn't he have some spark of manhood about
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4123] opinion is about some of those little jokers? I believe half of them
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4149] turned up about his neck. He wore a round hat of hard black felt.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4229] Cowley. I just waited till I caught his eye, and said: 'About that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4230] little matter I was speaking to you about....' 'That'll be all right, Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4232] all about it."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4424] "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4493] "Sit down, Joe," said Mr. O'Connor, "we're just talking about the
[A Mother] [4602] hands and pockets full of dirty pieces of paper, arranging about the
[A Mother] [4619] began to loosen their tongues about her, she silenced them by
[A Mother] [4856] evidently about Kathleen for they both glanced at her often as she
[A Mother] [4889] she didn't know anything about Mr. Fitzpatrick. Her daughter had
[A Mother] [4900] "I don't know anything about Mr. Fitzpatrick," repeated Mrs.
[Grace] [5173] opened his eyes and looked about him. He looked at the circle of
[Grace] [5180] He was helped to his feet. The manager said something about a
[Grace] [5232] to the counter and a curate set about removing the traces of blood
[Grace] [5659] that we're arranging about for Thursday."
[Grace] [5698] about to concern themselves on his behalf, he thought he owed it
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5711] well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit. They're the boyos
[Grace] [5716] "It's a curious thing," said Mr. Cunningham, "about the Jesuit
[Grace] [5955] "O, I know about the infallibility of the Pope. I remember I was
[Grace] [6011] "And what about Dowling?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[The Dead] [6247] go about much, gave music lessons to beginners on the old square
[The Dead] [6362] had made for his speech. He was undecided about the lines from
[The Dead] [6450] you've seen about the room. Gretta was saying..."
[The Dead] [6456] children, Gretta, you're not anxious about them?"
[The Dead] [6466] Gabriel was about to ask his aunt some questions on this point, but
[The Dead] [6576] get him to sing later on. All Dublin is raving about him."
[The Dead] [6594] Malins across the landing. The latter, a young man of about forty,
[The Dead] [6714] Gabriel coloured and was about to knit his brows, as if he did not
[The Dead] [6819] Then, just as the chain was about to start again, she stood on tiptoe
[The Dead] [6887] near he began to think again about his speech and about the
[The Dead] [6952] Aunt Julia smiled broadly and murmured something about
[The Dead] [6991] "I know all about the honour of God, Mary Jane, but I think it's not
[The Dead] [7286] chocolates and sweets were now passed about the table and Aunt
[The Dead] [7526] "Why, what was wonderful about Johnny?" asked Mr. Browne.
[The Dead] [7538] mill. That was all very well; but now comes the tragic part about
[The Dead] [7717] She was in the same attitude and seemed unaware of the talk about
[The Dead] [7869] burden, her skirt girt tightly about her. He could have flung his
[The Dead] [7870] arms about her hips and held her still, for his arms were trembling
[The Dead] [7920] waited again and then, fearing that diffidence was about to
[The Dead] [7929] "Yes. What about him?"
[The Dead] [7938] annoyed, too, about something? If she would only turn to him or
[The Dead] [7946] language about the sottish Malins and his pound. He longed to cry
[The Dead] [7972] arm swiftly about her body and drawing her towards him, he said
[The Dead] [7975] "Gretta, dear, what are you thinking about?"
[The Dead] [7985] "O, I am thinking about that song, The Lass of Aughrim."
[The Dead] [7996] "What about the song? Why does that make you cry?"
[The Dead] [8004] "I am thinking about a person long ago who used to sing that
[The Dead] [8096] "It was in the winter," she said, "about the beginning of the winter
[The Dead] [8182] would cast about in his mind for some words that might console