Dubliners by James Joyce
age

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 15 occurrences of the word:   age

[The Sisters] [66] let a young lad run about and play with young lads of his own age
[An Encounter] [596] The man smiled as before and said that when he was our age he
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[After the Race] [1161] He was about twenty-six years of age, with a soft, light brown
[The Boarding House] [1935] her hospitality. He was thirty-four or thirty-five years of age, so
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3886] "What age is he?" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4325] "What age are you?" he asked.
[A Mother] [4611] made few friends at school. When she came to the age of marriage
[A Mother] [4635] the age of twenty-four. He sent the older daughter, Kathleen, to a
[Grace] [5361] She was an active, practical woman of middle age. Not long before
[Grace] [5430] man of her husband's age would not change greatly before death.
[Grace] [5867] the age. His great idea, you know, was the union of the Latin and
[The Dead] [7360] a sceptical and, if I may use the phrase, a thought-tormented age:
[The Dead] [7366] spacious age. Those days might, without exaggeration, be called
[The Dead] [8190] wither dismally with age. He thought of how she who lay beside