Dubliners by James Joyce
an

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 188 occurrences of the word:   an

[The Sisters] [85] has an effect...."
[The Sisters] [105] house in Great Britain Street. It was an unassuming shop,
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[An Encounter] [366] AN ENCOUNTER
[An Encounter] [379] more timid. He looked like some kind of an Indian when he
[An Encounter] [380] capered round the garden, an old tea-cosy on his head, beating a
[An Encounter] [408] everyone assumed an innocent face. Father Butler turned over the
[An Encounter] [435] an excuse for him and Leo Dillon was to tell his brother to say he
[An Encounter] [441] were reassured: and I brought the first stage of the plot to an end
[An Encounter] [460] to an air in my head. I was very happy.
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[Araby] [697] free. An uninhabited house of two storeys stood at the blind end,
[Araby] [740] door. The blind was pulled down to within an inch of the sash so
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [834] an hour, seeing nothing but the brown-clad figure cast by my
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Araby] [842] gossip of the tea-table. The meal was prolonged beyond an hour
[Araby] [875] After an intolerable delay the train moved out of the station
[Araby] [880] the bare carriage. In a few minutes the train drew up beside an
[Eveline] [985] advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an
[Eveline] [1034] Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the
[Eveline] [1038] used to call her Poppens out of fun. First of all it had been an
[After the Race] [1157] he had had a very satisfactory luncheon; and besides he was an
[After the Race] [1163] had begun life as an advanced Nationalist, had modified his views
[After the Race] [1242] In Jimmy's house this dinner had been pronounced an occasion. A
[After the Race] [1276] danger of personal spite. The alert host at an opportunity lifted his
[After the Race] [1292] A torrent of talk followed. Farley was an American. No one knew
[After the Race] [1299] Station. The ticket-collector saluted Jimmy; he was an old man:
[After the Race] [1317] Then an impromptu square dance, the men devising original
[After the Race] [1333] Diamonds. Jimmy felt obscurely the lack of an audience: the wit
[Two Gallants] [1369] warm grey evening air an unchanging unceasing murmur.
[Two Gallants] [1374] step on to the road, owing to his companion's rudeness, wore an
[Two Gallants] [1443] to the roadway and back again. Corley was the son of an inspector
[Two Gallants] [1473] Corley closed one eye expressively as an answer.
[Two Gallants] [1555] reassurance. Corley swung his head to and fro as if to toss aside an
[Two Gallants] [1592] Corley glanced sideways at his friend and an unpleasant grin
[Two Gallants] [1597] "Damn it!" said Lenehan boldly, "I don't want an introduction. All I
[Two Gallants] [1686] breakfast-time. He sat down at an uncovered wooden table
[Two Gallants] [1732] One said that he had seen Mac an hour before in Westmoreland
[Two Gallants] [1760] them. Yet it was surely half-an-hour since he had seen the clock of
[Two Gallants] [1771] They did not seem to be speaking. An intimation of the result
[The Boarding House] [1932] she had all the weight of social opinion on her side: she was an
[The Boarding House] [1945] Some mothers would be content to patch up such an affair for a
[The Boarding House] [2012] She would put an end to herself, she said.
[A Little Cloud] [2140] had bought them in his bachelor days and many an evening, as he
[A Little Cloud] [2214] him like an infant hope. He stepped onward bravely.
[A Little Cloud] [2285] "I drink very little as a rule," said Little Chandler modestly. "An
[A Little Cloud] [2309] "Tommy," he said, "I see you haven't changed an atom. You're the
[A Little Cloud] [2381] "Then it is an immoral city," said Little Chandler, with timid
[A Little Cloud] [2415] a story about an English duchess--a story which he knew to be
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2464] "I hope you'll spend an evening with us," he said, "before you go
[A Little Cloud] [2484] must have an evening together. That's agreed now, isn't it?"
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2499] as a deoc an doruis--that's good vernacular for a small whisky, I
[A Little Cloud] [2579] Monica came for an hour or so in the morning and an hour or so in
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2668] The child stopped for an instant, had a spasm of fright and began
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2772] might give him an order on the cashier. He stood still, gazing
[Counterparts] [2827] an air of absentmindedness.
[Counterparts] [2855] she came. She was sitting beside his desk now in an aroma of
[Counterparts] [2884] cashier privately for an advance? No, the cashier was no good, no
[Counterparts] [2885] damn good: he wouldn't give an advance.... He knew where he
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2933] that his position was bad enough. He had been obliged to offer an
[Counterparts] [2939] with everyone else. Mr. Alleyne would never give him an hour's
[Counterparts] [3013] Weathers who was performing at the Tivoli as an acrobat and
[Counterparts] [3017] have an Apollinaris too; but the boys told Tim to make theirs hot.
[Counterparts] [3040] striking in her appearance. An immense scarf of peacock-blue
[Clay] [3305] because none of the young men seemed to notice her but an elderly
[A Painful Case] [3440] and pretentious. He lived in an old sombre house and from his
[A Painful Case] [3444] every article of furniture in the room: a black iron bedstead, an
[A Painful Case] [3447] bookcase had been made in an alcove by means of shelves of
[A Painful Case] [3460] from time to time and, in an ironical moment, the headline of an
[A Painful Case] [3463] fragrance of new cedarwood pencils or of a bottle of gum or of an
[A Painful Case] [3470] black hair and a tawny moustache did not quite cover an
[A Painful Case] [3476] his own acts with doubtful side-glasses. He had an odd
[A Painful Case] [3486] he was set free. He dined in an eating-house in George's Street
[A Painful Case] [3491] brought him sometimes to an opera or a concert: these were the
[A Painful Case] [3501] never arose, his life rolled out evenly--an adventureless tale.
[A Painful Case] [3511] He took the remark as an invitation to talk. He was surprised that
[A Painful Case] [3516] had remained intelligent. It was an oval face with strongly marked
[A Painful Case] [3519] deliberate swoon of the pupil into the iris, revealing for an instant
[A Painful Case] [3534] Meeting her a third time by accident he found courage to make an
[A Painful Case] [3542] of pleasures that he did not suspect that anyone else would take an
[A Painful Case] [3554] for some time he had assisted at the meetings of an Irish Socialist
[A Painful Case] [3556] sober workmen in a garret lit by an inefficient oil-lamp. When the
[A Painful Case] [3561] were hard-featured realists and that they resented an exactitude
[A Painful Case] [3569] himself to the criticisms of an obtuse middle class which entrusted
[A Painful Case] [3575] warm soil about an exotic. Many times she allowed the dark to fall
[A Painful Case] [3581] that in her eyes he would ascend to an angelical stature; and, as he
[A Painful Case] [3650] absence of Mr. Leverett) held an inquest on the body of Mrs.
[A Painful Case] [3706] was not at home until an hour after the accident. The jury returned
[A Painful Case] [3723] in some house on the Lucan road. What an end! The whole
[A Painful Case] [3732] to be filled by the barman. Just God, what an end! Evidently she
[A Painful Case] [3733] had been unfit to live, without any strength of purpose, an easy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3815] light. It was an old man's face, very bony and hairy. The moist blue
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3874] "Only I'm an old man now I'd change his tune for him. I'd take the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3922] of an election address. In the middle of the room was a small table
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3974] "Don't you know they want to present an address of welcome to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3989] down the collar of his coat, displaying, as he did so, an ivy leaf in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3993] talk of an address of welcome."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4198] "Ask me an easier one," said Mr. Henchy.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4204] We haven't many of them, thank God! but we have a few.... He's an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4261] live on the smell of an oil- rag.' And do you know what he told
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4404] In a few minutes an apologetic "Pok!" was heard as the cork flew
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4429] an influx of money into this country. The citizens of Dublin will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4453] personally. He's just an ordinary knockabout like you and me. He's
[A Mother] [4646] an Irish teacher to the house. Kathleen and her sister sent Irish
[A Mother] [4727] When she had an opportunity, she called Mr. Holohan aside and
[A Mother] [4749] audience behaved indecorously, as if the concert were an informal
[A Mother] [4798] three-quarters of an hour before the time at which the concert was
[A Mother] [4808] oldish face which was screwed into an expression of trustfulness
[A Mother] [4825] in an office in the city and, as a boy, he had sung prolonged bass
[A Mother] [4828] grand opera. One night, when an operatic artiste had fallen ill, he
[A Mother] [4840] jealousy with an ebullient friendliness. It was his humour to have
[A Mother] [4841] people know what an ordeal a concert was to him. Therefore when
[A Mother] [4858] contralto. An unknown solitary woman with a pale face walked
[A Mother] [4910] an American priest was giving in the Mansion House. He said they
[A Mother] [4913] plausible voice and careful manners. He held an extinguished cigar
[A Mother] [4998] the first item, who was shaking like an aspen. The singer and the
[A Mother] [5006] looked as if she had been resurrected from an old stage-wardrobe
[A Mother] [5065] Her face was inundated with an angry colour and she looked as if
[A Mother] [5091] still for an instant like an angry stone image and, when the first
[Grace] [5148] for an instant, sighed and closed them again. One of gentlemen
[Grace] [5152] opened and an immense constable entered. A crowd which had
[Grace] [5170] called for some brandy. The constable repeated the order in an
[Grace] [5236] an outsider. The injured man said again as well as he could.
[Grace] [5258] "I'an't 'an," he answered, "'y 'ongue is hurt."
[Grace] [5361] She was an active, practical woman of middle age. Not long before
[Grace] [5409] Mr. Cunningham was the very man for such a case. He was an
[Grace] [5412] he had married an unpresentable woman who was an incurable
[Grace] [5444] bitten off a piece of his tongue during an epileptic fit and the
[Grace] [5481] with an air of challenge. Mr. Cunningham nodded his head rapidly
[Grace] [5511] He had begun life as an obscure financier by lending small sums of
[Grace] [5517] bitterly as an Irish Jew and an illiterate, and saw divine
[Grace] [5663] "No, no," said Mr. Cunningham in an evasive tone, "it's just a
[Grace] [5700] conversation for a long while, but listened, with an air of calm
[Grace] [5704] length. "They're an educated order. I believe they mean well, too."
[Grace] [5805] "But he's an Orangeman, Crofton, isn't he?" said Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5933] Mr. Kernan seemed to be troubled in mind. He made an effort to
[Grace] [5946] word of false doctrine. Now isn't that an astonishing thing?"
[Grace] [5962] whisky falling into glasses made an agreeable interlude.
[Grace] [6036] Mr. Kernan knitted his brows and, lowering his head like an angry
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6041] properly taped, my lad. He had an eye like a hawk."
[Grace] [6099] an effect on his audience and continuing to shake his head to and
[Grace] [6118] church fell upon an assembly of black clothes and white collars,
[Grace] [6142] Freeman's Journal, and poor O'Carroll, an old friend of Mr.
[Grace] [6159] and, covering his face with his hands, prayed. After an interval, he
[Grace] [6162] original position on his knee and presented an attentive face to the
[Grace] [6164] surplice with an elaborate large gesture and slowly surveyed the
[The Dead] [6372] tone. His whole speech was a mistake from first to last, an utter
[The Dead] [6377] women. Aunt Julia was an inch or so the taller. Her hair, drawn
[The Dead] [6410] "Don't mind him, Aunt Kate," she said. "He's really an awful
[The Dead] [6608] seemed an offhand fashion by reason of the habitual catch in his
[The Dead] [6611] repeat in an undertone the story he had just told to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6672] stood before the pierglass. She held an open book on her knees and
[The Dead] [6700] of her collar bore on it an Irish device and motto.
[The Dead] [6755] "O, Mr. Conroy, will you come for an excursion to the Aran Isles
[The Dead] [6837] was an enthusiast but there was a time for all things. Perhaps he
[The Dead] [6910] not be sorry to see him fail in his speech. An idea came into his
[The Dead] [6922] leaned upon his arm, smiling and hanging her head. An irregular
[The Dead] [6927] of an old song of Aunt Julia's--Arrayed for the Bridal. Her voice,
[The Dead] [6955] near him in the manner of a showman introducing a prodigy to an
[The Dead] [7103] goose. He felt quite at ease now for he was an expert carver and
[The Dead] [7185] of how one night an Italian tenor had sung five encores to Let me
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7281] neighbour in an indistinct undertone:
[The Dead] [7363] hospitality, of kindly humour which belonged to an older day.
[The Dead] [7406] task would be an invidious one and one beyond my poor powers.
[The Dead] [7487] collar and wore on his head an oval fur cap. He pointed down the
[The Dead] [7864] An old man was dozing in a great hooded chair in the hall. He lit a
[The Dead] [7954] come from the window. She stood before him for an instant,
[The Dead] [7983] She did not answer at once. Then she said in an outburst of tears:
[The Dead] [8026] he had: big, dark eyes! And such an expression in them--an
[The Dead] [8089] vague world. But he shook himself free of it with an effort of
[The Dead] [8171] riot of emotions of an hour before. From what had it proceeded?