Dubliners by James Joyce
black

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

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There are 28 occurrences of the word:   black

[The Sisters] [56] black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by
[The Sisters] [126] black snuff-box for his hands trembled too much to allow him to
[The Sisters] [204] was very truculent, grey and massive, with black cavernous
[An Encounter] [522] black. The only sailor whose eyes could have been called green
[An Encounter] [554] He was shabbily dressed in a suit of greenish-black and wore what
[Eveline] [1015] she could and do her marketing, holding her black leather purse
[Eveline] [1097] doors of the sheds she caught a glimpse of the black mass of the
[Two Gallants] [1631] blue serge skirt was held at the waist by a belt of black leather.
[Two Gallants] [1634] She wore a short black jacket with mother-of-pearl buttons and a
[Two Gallants] [1635] ragged black boa. The ends of her tulle collarette had been
[Counterparts] [2857] great black feather in her hat. Mr. Alleyne had swivelled his chair
[A Painful Case] [3444] every article of furniture in the room: a black iron bedstead, an
[A Painful Case] [3449] black and scarlet rug covered the foot. A little hand-mirror hung
[A Painful Case] [3470] black hair and a tawny moustache did not quite cover an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4145] the doorway. His black clothes were tightly buttoned on his short
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4149] turned up about his neck. He wore a round hat of hard black felt.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4168] "He's round at the Black Eagle," said Mr. Henchy. "But won't you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4277] "From the Black Eagle," said the boy, walking in sideways and
[A Mother] [4824] with a scattered black moustache. He was the son of a hall porter
[Grace] [5288] full of a black liquid. From these bowls Mr. Kernan tasted tea. He
[Grace] [6118] church fell upon an assembly of black clothes and white collars,
[The Dead] [6333] glossy black hair was parted in the middle and brushed in a long
[The Dead] [7097] up according to the colours of their uniforms, the first two black,
[The Dead] [7174] sharply. "Is it because he's only a black?"
[The Dead] [7625] her skirt which the shadow made appear black and white. It was
[The Dead] [8179] dressed in black, his silk hat on his knees. The blinds would be