Dubliners by James Joyce
children

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 36 occurrences of the word:   children

[The Sisters] [60] "I wouldn't like children of mine," he said, "to have too much to
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [83] "It's bad for children," said old Cotter, "because their mind are so
[The Sisters] [84] impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it
[Eveline] [948] they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then
[Eveline] [951] roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field
[Eveline] [1019] children who had been left to hr charge went to school regularly
[Eveline] [1064] children laugh.
[The Boarding House] [1833] separation from him with care of the children. She would give him
[A Little Cloud] [2132] on the children who ran screaming along the gravel paths and on
[A Little Cloud] [2151] the air had grown sharp. A horde of grimy children populated the
[Counterparts] [3123] They had five children. A little boy came running down the stairs.
[Counterparts] [3142] darkness? Are the other children in bed?"
[Clay] [3215] would have, all the children singing! Only she hoped that Joe
[Clay] [3324] children had their Sunday dresses on. There were two big girls in
[Clay] [3328] the children say:
[Clay] [3336] could she find it. Then she asked all the children had any of them
[Clay] [3337] eaten it--by mistake, of course--but the children all said no and
[Clay] [3355] the piano for the children and they danced and sang. Then the two
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3378] table and then led the children up to the table, blindfold. One got
[Clay] [3400] children and Joe made Maria take a glass of wine. Soon they were
[Clay] [3407] At last the children grew tired and sleepy and Joe asked Maria
[Clay] [3411] children be quiet and listen to Maria's song. Then she played the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3879] "That's what ruins children," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Grace] [5302] Mr. Power sat downstairs in the kitchen asking the children where
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5379] children were still at school.
[Grace] [5455] wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play
[Grace] [5849] with a certain grace, complimented little children and spoke with a
[Grace] [6167] "For the children of this world are wiser in their generation than
[Grace] [6168] the children of light. Wherefore make unto yourselves friends out
[The Dead] [6456] children, Gretta, you're not anxious about them?"
[The Dead] [7803] Their children, his writing, her household cares had not quenched