Dubliners by James Joyce
deal

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 14 occurrences of the word:   deal

[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [143] before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish
[Two Gallants] [1669] great deal, to invent and to amuse and his brain and throat were
[Clay] [3236] the matron was such a nice person to deal with, so genteel.
[Clay] [3246] that every woman got her four slices. There was a great deal of
[Clay] [3352] been a very overbearing person to deal with. Joe said he wasn't so
[Clay] [3392] pause for a few seconds; and then a great deal of scuffling and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4234] "There's some deal on in that quarter," said Mr. O'Connor
[A Mother] [4617] romantic desires by eating a great deal of Turkish Delight in
[A Mother] [4803] member of the committee in the hall and, after a great deal of
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[Grace] [5813] "There's a good deal in that," said Mr. Power. "There used always
[The Dead] [7126] deal of confusion and laughter and noise, the noise of orders and
[The Dead] [7589] cab. There was a good deal of confused talk, and then Mr. Browne