Dubliners by James Joyce
do

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 102 occurrences of the word:   do

[The Sisters] [63] "How do you mean, Mr. Cotter?" asked my aunt.
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [127] do this without spilling half the snuff about the floor. Even as he
[The Sisters] [149] difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[An Encounter] [427] myself. But real adventures, I reflected, do not happen to people
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [656] unruly there was nothing would do him any good but a good sound
[Eveline] [1002] threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead
[Eveline] [1015] she could and do her marketing, holding her black leather purse
[Two Gallants] [1761] the College of Surgeons. Would Corley do a thing like that? He lit
[The Boarding House] [1879] set her to do housework. As Polly was very lively the intention was
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1977] loophole of reparation. The harm was done. What could he do now
[The Boarding House] [2010] "O Bob! Bob! What am I to do? What am I to do at all?"
[The Boarding House] [2042] "What am I to do?" The instinct of the celibate warned him to hold
[A Little Cloud] [2203] away. You could do nothing in Dublin. As he crossed Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2259] saw you last? Dear God, how old we're getting! Do you see any
[A Little Cloud] [2320] choice. That'd do you good."
[A Little Cloud] [2369] "Every place is immoral," he said. "Of course you do find spicy
[A Little Cloud] [2391] "O, come on, another one won't do you any harm. What is it? The
[A Little Cloud] [2513] inferior in birth and education. He was sure that he could do
[A Little Cloud] [2514] something better than his friend had ever done, or could ever do,
[A Little Cloud] [2535] --if I ever do."
[A Little Cloud] [2554] have a good fat account at the bank or she won't do for me."
[A Little Cloud] [2558] "Why, man alive," said Ignatius Gallaher, vehemently, "do you
[A Little Cloud] [2584] him short answers. She said she would do without any tea but
[A Little Cloud] [2661] It was useless. He couldn't read. He couldn't do anything. The
[A Little Cloud] [2695] "It's nothing.... He ... he began to cry.... I couldn't ... I didn't do
[Counterparts] [2753] Do you hear me now?"
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2760] half. How many courses do you want, I'd like to know.... Do you
[Counterparts] [2783] "Very good, you needn't wait to see. Go downstairs and do your
[Counterparts] [2882] His body ached to do something, to rush out and revel in violence.
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [3089] "What the hell do you know about it?" said Farrington fiercely,
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3141] "Light the lamp. What do you mean by having the place in
[Counterparts] [3155] "On that fire! You let the fire out! By God, I'll teach you to do that
[Clay] [3202] wouldn't do to the dummy who had charge of the irons if it wasn't
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3388] her hand out in the air as she was told to do. She moved her hand
[Clay] [3397] to do it over again: and this time she got the prayer-book.
[Clay] [3409] songs. Mrs. Donnelly said "Do, please, Maria!" and so Maria had
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3840] "Never mind, this'll do," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3975] Edward Rex if he comes here next year? What do we want
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4068] "Thats a nice how-do-you-do," said Mr. O'Connor. "How does he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4101] won't suspect you. Do you twig?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4118] He's a clever chap, too, with the pen. Do you remember that thing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4241] I'm thinking seriously of becoming a City Father myself. What do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4242] you think? Would I do for the job?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4261] live on the smell of an oil- rag.' And do you know what he told
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4353] while I do the talking."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4466] do it for Edward the Seventh?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4506] wrote--do you remember? Have you got it on you?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4593] "What do you think of that, Crofton?" cried Mr. Henchy. "Isn't that
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4807] could she do anything. Mrs. Kearney looked searchingly at the
[A Mother] [5042] the sake of the artistes. But what else could she do? She appealed
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[A Mother] [5078] fellow fol-the-diddle-I-do."
[Grace] [5184] "Where do you live?"
[Grace] [5190] "Where do you live" repeated the constable.
[Grace] [5310] "Such a sight! O, he'll do for himself one day and that's the holy
[Grace] [5435] and religion was religion. The scheme might do good and, at least,
[Grace] [5436] it could do no harm. Her beliefs were not extravagant. She
[Grace] [6065] "If he doesn't like it," he said bluntly, "he can... do the other thing.
[Grace] [6079] "All we have to do," said Mr. Cunningham, "is to stand up with
[Grace] [6083] do."
[Grace] [6090] I'll do the job right enough. I'll do the retreat business and
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6412] him do the dumb-bells, and forcing Eva to eat the stirabout. The
[The Dead] [6455] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate, "by far the best thing to do. And the
[The Dead] [6563] partner, Mr. Bergin. O, that'll just do now."
[The Dead] [6779] "And why do you go to France and Belgium," said Miss Ivors,
[The Dead] [6847] usual. Miss Daly will carve the ham and I'll do the pudding."
[The Dead] [6869] "O, do go, Gabriel," she cried. "I'd love to see Galway again."
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7249] "And do you mean to say," asked Mr. Browne incredulously, "that
[The Dead] [7275] do them as well as a coffin?"
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7414] Gentlemen, that I do not know to which of them I should award the
[The Dead] [7568] on, sir! What do you mean, sir? Johnny! Johnny! Most
[The Dead] [7604] "Do you know Trinity College?"
[The Dead] [7664] "O, do, Mary Jane," said Aunt Kate.
[The Dead] [7704] "So do I," said Miss O'Callaghan. "I think Christmas is never really
[The Dead] [7726] remember it properly. Why? Do you know it?"
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [8046] "How do I know? To see him, perhaps."
[The Dead] [8107] Gabriel, like the way they do in the country. He was going to study