Dubliners by James Joyce
felt

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 58 occurrences of the word:   felt

[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [96] desired to confess something. I felt my soul receding into some
[The Sisters] [101] paralysis and I felt that I too was smiling feebly as if to absolve the
[The Sisters] [140] mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a
[The Sisters] [174] lamp of antique fashion. I felt that I had been very far away, in
[An Encounter] [536] field. We both felt rather tired and when we reached the field we
[An Encounter] [605] something or felt a sudden chill. As he proceeded I noticed that his
[Eveline] [998] sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew
[Eveline] [1034] Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the
[Eveline] [1037] lass that loves a sailor, she always felt pleasantly confused. He
[Eveline] [1099] answered nothing. She felt her cheek pale and cold and, out of a
[Eveline] [1108] A bell clanged upon her heart. She felt him seize her hand:
[After the Race] [1247] equation to the bows of his dress tie, his father may have felt even
[After the Race] [1273] influences, felt the buried zeal of his father wake to life within
[After the Race] [1333] Diamonds. Jimmy felt obscurely the lack of an audience: the wit
[Two Gallants] [1673] left when he came to the corner of Rutland Square and felt more at
[Two Gallants] [1717] heart against the world. But all hope had not left him. He felt
[Two Gallants] [1718] better after having eaten than he had felt before, less weary of his
[The Boarding House] [1951] room to say that she wished to speak with him. She felt sure she
[The Boarding House] [1981] else's business. He felt his heart leap warmly in his throat as he
[The Boarding House] [2015] right, never fear. He felt against his shirt the agitation of her
[A Little Cloud] [2136] He felt how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being
[A Little Cloud] [2200] felt himself superior to the people he passed. For the first time his
[A Little Cloud] [2221] verse. He felt them within him. He tried weigh his soul to see if it
[A Little Cloud] [2247] to be full of people and he felt that the people were observing him
[A Little Cloud] [2268] colourless. He bent his head and felt with two sympathetic fingers
[A Little Cloud] [2504] made him blush at any time: and now he felt warm and excited.
[A Little Cloud] [2511] his sensitive nature. He felt acutely the contrast between his own
[A Little Cloud] [2646] He paused. He felt the rhythm of the verse about him in the room.
[A Little Cloud] [2705] Little Chandler felt his cheeks suffused with shame and he stood
[Counterparts] [2769] sharp sensation of thirst. The man recognised the sensation and felt
[Counterparts] [2795] then he could write. He felt that he must slake the thirst in his
[Counterparts] [2881] He felt strong enough to clear out the whole office singlehanded.
[Counterparts] [2932] say a word to him when he was with the chief clerk. The man felt
[Counterparts] [2938] felt savage and thirsty and revengeful, annoyed with himself and
[Counterparts] [2949] He felt his great body again aching for the comfort of the
[Counterparts] [3102] full of smouldering anger and revengefulness. He felt humiliated
[Clay] [3220] have felt herself in the way (though Joe's wife was ever so nice
[Clay] [3390] saucers. She felt a soft wet substance with her fingers and was
[A Painful Case] [3487] where he felt himself safe from the society o Dublin's gilded youth
[A Painful Case] [3555] Party where he had felt himself a unique figure amidst a score of
[A Painful Case] [3560] they took in the question of wages was inordinate. He felt that they
[A Painful Case] [3780] felt his moral nature falling to pieces.
[A Painful Case] [3787] with despair. He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he
[A Painful Case] [3806] again: perfectly silent. He felt that he was alone.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4149] turned up about his neck. He wore a round hat of hard black felt.
[Grace] [6076] Mr. Power said nothing. He felt completely out-generalled. But a
[The Dead] [6324] Gabriel coloured, as if he felt he had made a mistake and, without
[The Dead] [6750] question and Gabriel felt more at ease. A friend of hers had shown
[The Dead] [7103] goose. He felt quite at ease now for he was an expert carver and
[The Dead] [7637] painter he would paint her in that attitude. Her blue felt hat would
[The Dead] [7802] ecstasy. For the years, he felt, had not quenched his soul or hers.
[The Dead] [7854] with him a few hours before. He had felt proud and happy then,
[The Dead] [7859] closely to his side; and, as they stood at the hotel door, he felt that
[The Dead] [7966] with his. Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in
[The Dead] [8058] Gabriel felt humiliated by the failure of his irony and by the
[The Dead] [8091] again, for he felt that she would tell him of herself. Her hand was
[The Dead] [8194] Generous tears filled Gabriel's eyes. He had never felt like that