Dubliners by James Joyce
fire

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 43 occurrences of the word:   fire

[The Sisters] [18] Old Cotter was sitting at the fire, smoking, when I came
[The Sisters] [122] sitting in his arm-chair by the fire, nearly smothered in his
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Eveline] [1061] toast for her at the fire. Another day, when their mother was alive,
[Two Gallants] [1713] thought how pleasant it would be to have a warm fire to sit by and
[Counterparts] [3116] the kitchen empty and the kitchen fire nearly out. He bawled
[Counterparts] [3153] The man jumped up furiously and pointed to the fire.
[Counterparts] [3155] "On that fire! You let the fire out! By God, I'll teach you to do that
[Counterparts] [3161] "I'll teach you to let the fire out!" he said, rolling up his sleeve in
[Counterparts] [3169] "Now, you'll let the fire out the next time!" said the man striking at
[Clay] [3185] in the big copper boilers. The fire was nice and bright and on one
[Clay] [3347] But Joe said it didn't matter and made her sit down by the fire. He
[Clay] [3365] So Maria let him have his way and they sat by the fire talking over
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3813] but, as he set himself to fan the fire again, his crouching shadow
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3816] eyes blinked at the fire and the moist mouth fell open at times,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3856] let in the wet, he spent a great part of the day sitting by the fire in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3864] taking up the piece of cardboard again, began to fan the fire slowly
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3897] silent, gazing into the fire. Someone opened the door of the room
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3909] into the light of the fire.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3919] which he thrust one after the other into the fire and carried to the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3920] table. A denuded room came into view and the fire lost all its
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3942] The old man returned to his seat by the fire, saying:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4002] over quickly to the fire, rubbing his hands as if he intended to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4034] Mr. Henchy began to snuffle and to rub his hands over the fire at a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4066] here and there on the fire.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4082] who had been staring moodily into the fire, called out suddenly:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4089] "Tell me," he said across the fire, "what brings our friend in here?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4093] cigarette into the fire, "he's hard up, like the rest of us."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4096] nearly put out the fire, which uttered a hissing protest.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4188] He sat down again at the fire. There was silence for a few
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4385] He took two bottles from the table and, carrying them to the fire,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4386] put them on the hob. Then he sat dow-n again by the fire and took
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4406] the fire, took his bottle and carried it back to the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4473] got up from his box and went to the fire. As he returned with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4488] fire."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4511] "Go on," said Mr. O'Connor. "Fire away, Joe."
[A Mother] [5107] fire.
[Grace] [5392] odour, and gave them chairs at the fire. Mr. Kernan's tongue, the
[The Dead] [7716] hair, which he had seen her drying at the fire a few days before.
[The Dead] [7791] "Is the fire hot, sir?"
[The Dead] [7797] coursing in warm flood along his arteries. Like the tender fire of
[The Dead] [7804] all their souls' tender fire. In one letter that he had written to her