Dubliners by James Joyce
for

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

This is a hypertextual, self-referential edition of
Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

Click on any word to see its occurrences in the text;
click on line numbers to go to that line;
click on chapter names to go to that chapter;
or search using the form below.
Search terms can contain spaces and punctuation.

The concordance for Dubliners ordered alphanumerically,
and listed in order of word frequency. Click here for more texts.

There are 507 occurrences of the word:   for

[The Sisters] [3] THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.
[The Sisters] [8] darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head
[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [76] "No, no, not for me," said old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [83] "It's bad for children," said old Cotter, "because their mind are so
[The Sisters] [87] I crammed my mouth with stirabout for fear I might give utterance
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [97] pleasant and vicious region; and there again I found it waiting for
[The Sisters] [109] Umbrellas Re-covered . No notice was visible now for the shutters
[The Sisters] [124] Toast for him and this present would have roused him from his
[The Sisters] [126] black snuff-box for his hands trembled too much to allow him to
[The Sisters] [131] priestly garments their green faded look for the red handkerchief,
[The Sisters] [142] death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night
[The Sisters] [182] unseemly to have shouted at her, my aunt shook hands with her for
[The Sisters] [203] as for the altar, his large hands loosely retaining a chalice. His face
[The Sisters] [253] "Well, Miss Flynn, at any rate it must be a great comfort for you to
[The Sisters] [254] know that you did all you could for him. You were both very kind
[The Sisters] [269] about the Mass in the chapel. Only for Father O'Rourke I don't
[The Sisters] [272] notice for the Freeman's General and took charge of all the papers
[The Sisters] [273] for the cemetery and poor James's insurance."
[The Sisters] [307] over he'd go out for a drive one fine day just to see the old house
[The Sisters] [311] them with the rheumatic wheels, for the day cheap--he said, at
[The Sisters] [320] for some time without speaking.
[The Sisters] [323] priesthood was too much for him. And then his life was, you might
[The Sisters] [332] deep revery. We waited respectfully for her to break the silence:
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[An Encounter] [378] house. But he played too fiercely for us who were younger and
[An Encounter] [386] vocation for the priesthood. Nevertheless it was true.
[An Encounter] [415] for a drink. I'm surprised at boys like you, educated, reading such
[An Encounter] [420] glory of the Wild West for me and the confused puffy face of Leo
[An Encounter] [423] for wild sensations, for the escape which those chronicles of
[An Encounter] [431] to break out of the weariness of schoollife for one day at least.
[An Encounter] [435] an excuse for him and Leo Dillon was to tell his brother to say he
[An Encounter] [462] When I had been sitting there for five or ten minutes I saw
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [497] of cranes and engines and often being shouted at for our
[An Encounter] [520] foreign sailors to see had any of them green eyes for I had some
[An Encounter] [537] made at once for a sloping bank over the ridge of which we could
[An Encounter] [549] the bank for some time without speaking I saw a man approaching
[An Encounter] [556] fairly old for his moustache was ashen-grey. When he passed at
[An Encounter] [559] for perhaps fifty paces he turned about and began to retrace his
[An Encounter] [561] ground with his stick, so slowly that I thought he was looking for
[An Encounter] [579] different; he goes in for games."
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [636] "In case he asks us for our names," I said "let you be Murphy and I'll
[An Encounter] [665] girls or having a girl for a sweetheart he would whip him and whip
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [733] Mangan's steps resignedly. She was waiting for us, her figure
[Araby] [746] spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [788] fighting for their caps and I was alone at the railings. She held one
[Araby] [795] "It's well for you," she said.
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [816] for the hat-brush, and answered me curtly:
[Araby] [826] Still it was early. I sat staring at the clock for some time and. when
[Araby] [833] over at the dark house where she lived. I may have stood there for
[Araby] [841] collected used stamps for some pious purpose. I had to endure the
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [849] "I'm afraid you may put off your bazaar for this night of Our Lord."
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Eveline] [965] objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years,
[Eveline] [1000] growing up he had never gone for her like he used to go for Harry
[Eveline] [1002] threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead
[Eveline] [1006] invariable squabble for money on Saturday nights had begun to
[Eveline] [1012] much more, for he was usually fairly bad on Saturday night. In the
[Eveline] [1027] where he had a home waiting for her. How well she remembered
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1060] been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made
[Eveline] [1061] toast for her at the fire. Another day, when their mother was alive,
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[Eveline] [1104] Could she still draw back after all he had done for her? Her
[After the Race] [1136] Their sympathy, however, was for the blue cars--the cars of their
[After the Race] [1172] took to bad courses for a while. He had money and he was popular;
[After the Race] [1174] circles. Then he had been sent for a term to Cambridge to see a
[After the Race] [1188] deep bass hum of melody for miles of the road The Frenchmen
[After the Race] [1191] not altogether pleasant for him, as he had nearly always to make a
[After the Race] [1197] the possession of money. These were three good reasons for
[After the Race] [1213] his substance! It was a serious thing for him.
[After the Race] [1218] of the concern. Jimmy had a respect for his father's shrewdness in
[After the Race] [1236] car steered out slowly for Grafton Street while the two young men
[After the Race] [1244] eagerness, also, to play fast and loose for the names of great
[After the Race] [1248] commercially satisfied at having secured for his son qualities often
[After the Race] [1250] Villona and his manner expressed a real respect for foreign
[After the Race] [1252] upon the Hungarian, who was beginning to have a sharp desire for
[After the Race] [1272] politics. Here was congenial ground for all. Jimmy, under generous
[After the Race] [1283] shoulders. The people made way for them. At the corner of
[After the Race] [1309] They got into a rowboat at the slip and made out for the
[After the Race] [1315] There was a yacht piano in the cabin. Villona played a waltz for
[After the Race] [1321] for form's sake. They drank, however: it was Bohemian. They
[After the Race] [1330] piano and played voluntaries for them. The other men played game
[After the Race] [1336] losing. But it was his own fault for he frequently mistook his cards
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1340] then someone proposed one great game for a finish.
[After the Race] [1343] a terrible game. They stopped just before the end of it to drink for
[Two Gallants] [1365] streets. The streets, shuttered for the repose of Sunday, swarmed
[Two Gallants] [1390] noiselessly for fully half a minute. Then he said:
[Two Gallants] [1401] was tired for he had been talking all the afternoon in a
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1451] was necessary for him to move his body from the hips. At present
[Two Gallants] [1475] "Is she game for that?" asked Lenehan dubiously. "You can never
[Two Gallants] [1489] tip for it."
[Two Gallants] [1554] His bright, small eyes searched his companion's face for
[Two Gallants] [1626] Lenehan observed them for a few minutes. Then he walked rapidly
[Two Gallants] [1647] and waited. After waiting for a little time he saw them coming
[Two Gallants] [1670] too dry for such a task. The problem of how he could pass the
[Two Gallants] [1680] plum-pudding. He eyed this food earnestly for some time and then,
[Two Gallants] [1684] He was hungry for, except some biscuits which he had asked two
[Two Gallants] [1696] He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility for his entry
[Two Gallants] [1705] ginger beer and sat for some time thinking of Corley's adventure.
[Two Gallants] [1745] the northern side of the Green hurrying for fear Corley should
[Two Gallants] [1777] talked for a few moments and then the young woman went down
[Two Gallants] [1783] hers from view for a few seconds and then she reappeared running
[The Boarding House] [1829] business. One night he went for his wife with the cleaver and she
[The Boarding House] [1850] Mrs. Mooney's young men paid fifteen shillings a week for board
[The Boarding House] [1852] common tastes and occupations and for this reason they were very
[The Boarding House] [1884] away: none of them meant business. Things went on so for a long
[The Boarding House] [1942] There must be reparation made in such case. It is all very well for
[The Boarding House] [1945] Some mothers would be content to patch up such an affair for a
[The Boarding House] [1947] For her only one reparation could make up for the loss of her
[The Boarding House] [1957] Besides, he had been employed for thirteen years in a great
[The Boarding House] [1958] Catholic wine-merchant's office and publicity would mean for
[The Boarding House] [1960] well. She knew he had a good screw for one thing and she
[The Boarding House] [1985] All his long years of service gone for nothing! All his industry and
[The Boarding House] [1991] duties and for nine-tenths of the year lived a regular life. He had
[The Boarding House] [1999] not make up his mind whether to like her or despise her for what
[The Boarding House] [2002] for, it said.
[The Boarding House] [2021] him. Then late one night as he was undressing for she had tapped
[The Boarding House] [2022] at his door, timidly. She wanted to relight her candle at his for hers
[The Boarding House] [2033] a little tumbler of punch ready for him. Perhaps they could be
[The Boarding House] [2044] reparation must be made for such a sin.
[The Boarding House] [2061] lover's eyes rested for a second or two on a thick bulldog face and
[The Boarding House] [2075] Polly sat for a little time on the side of the bed, crying. Then she
[The Boarding House] [2080] at the foot. She regarded the pillows for a long time and the sight
[The Boarding House] [2090] that she was waiting for anything.
[The Boarding House] [2101] Then she remembered what she had been waiting for.
[A Little Cloud] [2157] had roystered. No memory of the past touched him, for his mind
[A Little Cloud] [2188] yourself. Even when he was out at elbows and at his wits' end for
[A Little Cloud] [2197] admire him for it.
[A Little Cloud] [2199] Little Chandler quickened his pace. For the first time in his life he
[A Little Cloud] [2200] felt himself superior to the people he passed. For the first time his
[A Little Cloud] [2208] and waiting for the first chill of night bid them arise, shake
[A Little Cloud] [2211] into some London paper for him. Could he write something
[A Little Cloud] [2244] The light and noise of the bar held him at the doorways for a few
[A Little Cloud] [2273] looking for copy and sometimes not finding it: and then, always to
[A Little Cloud] [2275] for a few days. I'm deuced glad, I can tell you, to get back to the
[A Little Cloud] [2282] "You don't know what's good for you, my boy," said Ignatius
[A Little Cloud] [2313] anywhere even for a trip?"
[A Little Cloud] [2319] "The Isle of Man!" he said. "Go to London or Paris: Paris, for
[A Little Cloud] [2334] no city like Paris for gaiety, movement, excitement...."
[A Little Cloud] [2342] Bohemian cafes. Hot stuff! Not for a pious chap like you,
[A Little Cloud] [2359] they've a great feeling for the Irish there. When they heard I was
[A Little Cloud] [2370] bits in Paris. Go to one of the students' balls, for instance. That's
[A Little Cloud] [2379] the Parisienne--for style, for go."
[A Little Cloud] [2407] calm historian's tone, he proceeded to sketch for his friend some
[A Little Cloud] [2410] to Berlin. Some things he could not vouch for (his friends had told
[A Little Cloud] [2426] You can't help having a certain feeling for it. That's human
[A Little Cloud] [2475] little card-party. Only for that..."
[A Little Cloud] [2499] as a deoc an doruis--that's good vernacular for a small whisky, I
[A Little Cloud] [2506] cigar had confused his mind, for he was a delicate and abstinent
[A Little Cloud] [2509] noise, of listening to Gallaher's stories and of sharing for a brief
[A Little Cloud] [2550] watched him for a few moments and then said:
[A Little Cloud] [2554] have a good fat account at the bank or she won't do for me."
[A Little Cloud] [2579] Monica came for an hour or so in the morning and an hour or so in
[A Little Cloud] [2581] quarter to nine. Little Chandler had come home late for tea and,
[A Little Cloud] [2586] she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and
[A Little Cloud] [2607] it was a regular swindle to charge ten and elevenpence for it. At
[A Little Cloud] [2626] he had bought for his house on the hire system. Annie had chosen
[A Little Cloud] [2629] escape from his little house? Was it too late for him to try to live
[A Little Cloud] [2631] furniture still to be paid for. If he could only write a book and get
[A Little Cloud] [2632] it published, that might open the way for him.
[A Little Cloud] [2650] Bridge, for example. If he could get back again into that mood....
[A Little Cloud] [2663] useless! He was a prisoner for life. His arms trembled with anger
[A Little Cloud] [2668] The child stopped for an instant, had a spasm of fright and began
[A Little Cloud] [2671] piteously, losing its breath for four or five seconds, and then
[A Little Cloud] [2691] Little Chandler sustained for one moment the gaze of her eyes and
[Counterparts] [2751] another for shirking work. Let me tell you that if the contract is not
[Counterparts] [2758] well be talking to the wall as talking to you. Understand once for
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2768] his throat for a few moments and then passed, leaving after it a
[Counterparts] [2774] began to upset all the papers, searching for something. Then, as if
[Counterparts] [2816] a gulp and asked for a caraway seed. He put his penny on the
[Counterparts] [2817] counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom,
[Counterparts] [2829] "Mr. Alleyne has been calling for you," said the chief clerk
[Counterparts] [2839] in the Delacour case for Mr. Alleyne."
[Counterparts] [2870] letters typed in time for post. The man listened to the clicking of
[Counterparts] [2871] the machine for a few minutes and then set to work to finish his
[Counterparts] [2873] the glare and rattle of the public-house. It was a night for hot
[Counterparts] [2884] cashier privately for an advance? No, the cashier was no good, no
[Counterparts] [2887] The barometer of his emotional nature was set for a spell of riot.
[Counterparts] [2902] Alleyne. "Tell me," he added, glancing first for approval to the
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2921] work of you! Wait till you see! You'll apologise to me for your
[Counterparts] [2934] abject apology to Mr. Alleyne for his impertinence but he knew
[Counterparts] [2935] what a hornet's nest the office would be for him. He could
[Counterparts] [2937] out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew. He
[Counterparts] [2945] had been the beginning of it. He might have tried Higgins for the
[Counterparts] [2946] money, but sure Higgins never had anything for himself. A man
[Counterparts] [2949] He felt his great body again aching for the comfort of the
[Counterparts] [2951] could he touch Pat in O'Neill's. He could not touch him for more
[Counterparts] [2953] somewhere or other: he had spent his last penny for the g.p. and
[Counterparts] [2954] soon it would be too late for getting money anywhere. Suddenly,
[Counterparts] [2962] crown! but the consignor held out for six shillings; and in the end
[Counterparts] [2994] vivacity for the sight of five small hot whiskies was very
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3101] waiting for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was
[Counterparts] [3104] twopence in his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for
[Counterparts] [3137] "That's right.... Did she think of leaving any dinner for me?"
[Counterparts] [3149] "What's for my dinner?"
[Counterparts] [3177] for you.... I'll say a Hail Mary for you, pa, if you don't beat me....
[Clay] [3194] always sent for when the women quarrelled Over their tubs and
[Clay] [3203] for Maria. Everyone was so fond of Maria.
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3268] dress for mass on Sunday morning when she was a young girl; and
[Clay] [3306] gentleman made room for her. He was a stout gentleman and he
[Clay] [3312] supposed the bag was full of good things for the little ones and
[Clay] [3332] But Maria said she had brought something special for papa and
[Clay] [3334] look for her plumcake. She tried in Downes's bag and then in the
[Clay] [3339] accused of stealing. Everybody had a solution for the mystery and
[Clay] [3345] for nothing she nearly cried outright.
[Clay] [3349] repeating for her a smart answer which he had made to the
[Clay] [3355] the piano for the children and they danced and sang. Then the two
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3392] pause for a few seconds; and then a great deal of scuffling and
[Clay] [3399] After that Mrs. Donnelly played Miss McCloud's Reel for the
[Clay] [3430] like the long ago and no music for him like poor old Balfe,
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3461] advertisement for Bile Beans had been pasted on to the first sheet.
[A Painful Case] [3482] He had been for many years cashier of a private bank in Baggot
[A Painful Case] [3490] about the outskirts of the city. His liking for Mozart's music
[A Painful Case] [3497] they died. He performed these two social duties for old dignity's
[A Painful Case] [3519] deliberate swoon of the pupil into the iris, revealing for an instant
[A Painful Case] [3536] met always in the evening and chose the most quiet quarters for
[A Painful Case] [3537] their walks together. Mr. Duffy, however, had a distaste for
[A Painful Case] [3551] Sometimes in return for his theories she gave out some fact of her
[A Painful Case] [3554] for some time he had assisted at the meetings of an Irish Socialist
[A Painful Case] [3563] social revolution, he told her, would be likely to strike Dublin for
[A Painful Case] [3566] She asked him why did he not write out his thoughts. For what, he
[A Painful Case] [3568] incapable of thinking consecutively for sixty seconds? To submit
[A Painful Case] [3591] words disillusioned him. He did not visit her for a week, then he
[A Painful Case] [3596] and down the roads of the Park for nearly three hours. They agreed
[A Painful Case] [3618] paper for dessert.
[A Painful Case] [3659] employment of the railway company for fifteen years. On hearing
[A Painful Case] [3700] for twenty-two years and had lived happily until about two years
[A Painful Case] [3756] and he called for another punch. He sat a long time over it. The
[A Painful Case] [3804] voice touch his ear. He waited for some minutes listening. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3825] tobacco for a cigarette into a shapely cylinder but when spoken to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3874] "Only I'm an old man now I'd change his tune for him. I'd take the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3893] school? 'I won't keep you,' I says. 'You must get a job for yourself.'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3921] cheerful colour. The walls of the room were bare except for a copy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3961] working for only wants to get some job or other."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3968] not looking for fat jobs for his sons and nephews and cousins. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3978] "Our man won't vote for the address," said Mr. O'Connor. "He goes
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4017] "Yes," said Mr. O'Connor, beginning to search his pockets for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4037] "For the love of God, Jack, bring us a bit of coal. There must be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4051] got those little pigs' eyes for nothing. Blast his soul! Couldn't he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4069] expect us to work for him if he won't stump up?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4078] off for the present. See you later. 'Bye, 'bye."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4113] the old man. "Let him work for his own side and not come spying
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4128] "O, but I know it for a fact," said Mr. Henchy. "They're Castle
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4135] "There's a lineal descendant of Major Sirr for you if you like! O,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4137] country for fourpence--ay--and go down on his bended knees
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4165] velvety voice. "Don't let me disturb you now! I'm just looking for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4188] He sat down again at the fire. There was silence for a few
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4242] you think? Would I do for the job?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4267] sending out for a pound of chops for his dinner? How's that for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4290] "I was told to ask for the bottles."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4295] ask him to lend us a corkscrew--for Mr. Henchy, say. Tell him we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4373] and I out in the cold and rain looking for votes?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4396] bottle on the hob. He was silent for two reasons. The first reason,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4399] had been a canvasser for Wilkins, the Conservative, but when the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4402] been engaged to work for Mr. Tiemey.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4413] "Well, I got Parkes for one, and I got Atkinson for two, and got
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4466] do it for Edward the Seventh?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4502] renege him. By God, I'll say for you, Joe! No, by God, you stuck to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4537] For he lies dead whom the fell gang
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4545] Is bowed with woe--for he is gone
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4583] Mr. Lyons clapped. The applause continued for a little time. When
[A Mother] [4601] been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his
[A Mother] [4603] series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called
[A Mother] [4614] accomplishments, waiting for some suitor to brave it and offer her
[A Mother] [4632] strong rum punch. For his part, he was a model father. By paying a
[A Mother] [4633] small sum every week into a society, he ensured for both his
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4667] guineas for her services as accompanist at the four grand concerts.
[A Mother] [4670] wording of bills and the disposing of items for a programme, Mrs.
[A Mother] [4690] two-shilling tickets for the final concert and sent them to those
[A Mother] [4730] arranging for four concerts: four was too many.
[A Mother] [4737] they pleased and reserve all the talent for Saturday night. Mrs.
[A Mother] [4741] expense for such a concert. There was something she didn't like in
[A Mother] [4759] quickly with a glass of lemonade for a young lady and asked him
[A Mother] [4763] contract was for four concerts."
[A Mother] [4768] her daughter had signed for four concerts and that, of course,
[A Mother] [4770] originally stipulated for, whether the society gave the four concerts
[A Mother] [4785] public of the treat which was in store for it on the following
[A Mother] [4801] went all over the building looking for Mr. Holohan or Mr.
[A Mother] [4835] never drank anything stronger than milk for his voice's sake. Mr.
[A Mother] [4837] every year for prizes at the Feis Ceoil. On his fourth trial he had
[A Mother] [4856] evidently about Kathleen for they both glanced at her often as she
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4890] signed a contract for eight guineas and she would have to be paid.
[A Mother] [4909] could not wait for the concert as he had to report the lecture which
[A Mother] [4911] were to leave the report for him at the Freeman office and he
[A Mother] [4918] enough to suspect one reason for her politeness but young enough
[A Mother] [4922] beneath him rose and fell at that moment for him, that the laughter
[A Mother] [4937] was uncorking bottles for a few gentlemen. One of these
[A Mother] [5002] The first part of the concert was very successful except for Madam
[A Mother] [5013] the men went out for the interval, content.
[A Mother] [5041] farthing she would make Dublin ring. Of course she was sorry for
[A Mother] [5052] following Tuesday and that, in case her daughter did not play for
[A Mother] [5068] "I'm asking for my rights." she said.
[A Mother] [5086] daughter, gesticulating with them. She waited until it was time for
[A Mother] [5091] still for an instant like an angry stone image and, when the first
[A Mother] [5106] up and down the room, in order to cool himself for he his skin on
[Grace] [5145] man's face, sent for a policeman.
[Grace] [5148] for an instant, sighed and closed them again. One of gentlemen
[Grace] [5168] called for water. The constable knelt down also to help. The young
[Grace] [5170] called for some brandy. The constable repeated the order in an
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5235] When they came out into Grafton Street, Mr. Power whistled for
[Grace] [5310] "Such a sight! O, he'll do for himself one day and that's the holy
[Grace] [5333] "We were waiting for him to come home with the money. He
[Grace] [5374] presented to her no insuperable difficulties and for twenty-five
[Grace] [5375] years she had kept house shrewdly for her husband. Her two eldest
[Grace] [5382] She made beef-tea for him and scolded him roundly. She accepted
[Grace] [5396] them resemble warm cinders. He apologised to his guests for the
[Grace] [5406] not been in the pale of the Church for twenty years. He was fond,
[Grace] [5409] Mr. Cunningham was the very man for such a case. He was an
[Grace] [5411] happy. People had great sympathy with him, for it was known that
[Grace] [5413] drunkard. He had set up house for her six times; and each time she
[Grace] [5416] Everyone had respect for poor Martin Cunningham. He was a
[Grace] [5429] illusions left. Religion for her was a habit, and she suspected that a
[Grace] [5457] distance between two points and for short periods he had been
[Grace] [5459] Railway, a canvasser for advertisements for The Irish Times and
[Grace] [5460] for The Freeman's Journal, a town traveller for a coal firm on
[Grace] [5534] "Only for him----"
[Grace] [5536] "O, only for him," said Mr. Power, "it might have been a case of
[Grace] [5563] "Is this what we pay rates for?" he asked. "To feed and clothe these
[Grace] [5620] "And have you nothing for me, duckie?"
[Grace] [5626] "Nothing for poor little hubby!"
[Grace] [5659] that we're arranging about for Thursday."
[Grace] [5700] conversation for a long while, but listened, with an air of calm
[Grace] [5728] "The Jesuits cater for the upper classes," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5732] "Yes," said Mr. Kernan. "That's why I have a feeling for them. It's
[Grace] [5752] of character and as a reader of faces. He asked for particulars.
[Grace] [5755] Purdon is giving it. It's for business men, you know."
[Grace] [5821] He hesitated for a moment.
[Grace] [5833] "Here's a visitor for you!"
[Grace] [5853] He inquired politely for Mr. Kernan, placed his gift on the table
[Grace] [5856] a small account for groceries unsettled between him and Mr.
[Grace] [5975] others were all for it. The whole conclave except these two was
[Grace] [6104] "There's a nice Catholic for you!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6140] Hogan's nephew, who was up for the job in the Town Clerk's
[Grace] [6167] "For the children of this world are wiser in their generation than
[Grace] [6177] specially adapted for the guidance of those whose lot it was to lead
[Grace] [6179] manner of worldlings. It was a text for business men and
[Grace] [6183] forced to live in the world, and, to a certain extent, for the world:
[Grace] [6189] He told his hearers that he was there that evening for no terrifying,
[The Dead] [6221] for her she had not to attend to the ladies also. But Miss Kate and
[The Dead] [6232] pupils too. Never once had it fallen flat. For years and years it had
[The Dead] [6240] was now the main prop of the household, for she had the organ in
[The Dead] [6249] housemaid's work for them. Though their life was modest, they
[The Dead] [6259] Freddy Malins might turn up screwed. They would not wish for
[The Dead] [6268] for him, "Miss Kate and Miss Julia thought you were never
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6306] stamping and shuffling of feet on the floor above, listened for a
[The Dead] [6362] had made for his speech. He was undecided about the lines from
[The Dead] [6363] Robert Browning, for he feared they would be above the heads of
[The Dead] [6405] "But as for Gretta there," said Gabriel, "she'd walk home in the
[The Dead] [6411] bother, what with green shades for Tom's eyes at night and making
[The Dead] [6418] dress to her face and hair. The two aunts laughed heartily, too, for
[The Dead] [6458] "0, for one night," said Mrs. Conroy. "Besides, Bessie will look
[The Dead] [6494] Thanks for your beautiful waltz, Miss Daly. It made lovely time."
[The Dead] [6505] "I'm the man for the ladies," said Mr. Browne, pursing his lips until
[The Dead] [6516] a sideboard for viands and sweets. At a smaller sideboard in one
[The Dead] [6521] took anything strong, he opened three bottles of lemonade for
[The Dead] [6523] taking hold of the decanter, filled out for himself a goodly measure
[The Dead] [6542] for I feel I want it.'"
[The Dead] [6570] "O, Miss Daly, you're really awfully good, after playing for the last
[The Dead] [6575] "But I've a nice partner for you, Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor. I'll
[The Dead] [6638] was once more wrinkling with mirth, poured out for himself a
[The Dead] [6649] no melody for him and he doubted whether it had any melody for
[The Dead] [6665] kind of work had been taught for one year. His mother had worked
[The Dead] [6666] for him as a birthday present a waistcoat of purple tabinet, with
[The Dead] [6675] name of her sons for she was very sensible of the dignity of family
[The Dead] [6685] He knew that Mary Jane must be near the end of her piece for she
[The Dead] [6687] every bar and while he waited for the end the resentment died
[The Dead] [6717] "O, innocent Amy! I have found out that you write for The Daily
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6728] for which he was paid fifteen shillings. But that did not make him
[The Dead] [6729] a West Briton surely. The books he received for review were
[The Dead] [6755] "O, Mr. Conroy, will you come for an excursion to the Aran Isles
[The Dead] [6759] splendid for Gretta too if she'd come. She's from Connacht, isn't
[The Dead] [6771] "Well, you know, every year I go for a cycling tour with some
[The Dead] [6783] languages and partly for a change."
[The Dead] [6805] Gabriel did not answer for his retort had heated him.
[The Dead] [6815] great energy. He avoided her eyes for he had seen a sour
[The Dead] [6818] from under her brows for a moment quizzically until he smiled.
[The Dead] [6837] was an enthusiast but there was a time for all things. Perhaps he
[The Dead] [6865] go for a trip to the west of Ireland and I said I wouldn't."
[The Dead] [6873] She looked at him for a moment, then turned to Mrs. Malins and
[The Dead] [6876] "There's a nice husband for you, Mrs. Malins."
[The Dead] [6884] it for their dinner.
[The Dead] [6889] visit his mother Gabriel left the chair free for him and retired into
[The Dead] [6913] now on the wane among us may have had its faults but for my part
[The Dead] [6917] good: that was one for Miss Ivors. What did he care that his aunts
[The Dead] [6927] of an old song of Aunt Julia's--Arrayed for the Bridal. Her voice,
[The Dead] [6944] his voice proved too much for him.
[The Dead] [6984] on Christmas morning! And all for what?"
[The Dead] [6986] "Well, isn't it for the honour of God, Aunt Kate?" asked Mary Jane,
[The Dead] [6992] at all honourable for the pope to turn out the women out of the
[The Dead] [6994] whipper-snappers of boys over their heads. I suppose it is for the
[The Dead] [6999] in defence of her sister for it was a sore subject with her but Mary
[The Dead] [7025] and Mary Jane trying to persuade Miss Ivors to stay for supper. But
[The Dead] [7030] "But only for ten minutes, Molly," said Mrs. Conroy. "That won't
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7064] face, while Mrs. Conroy leaned over the banisters to listen for the
[The Dead] [7103] goose. He felt quite at ease now for he was an expert carver and
[The Dead] [7112] "Miss Higgins, what for you?"
[The Dead] [7119] Jane's idea and she had also suggested apple sauce for the goose
[The Dead] [7121] sauce had always been good enough for her and she hoped she
[The Dead] [7124] and carried across from the piano bottles of stout and ale for the
[The Dead] [7125] gentlemen and bottles of minerals for the ladies. There was a great
[The Dead] [7130] so that he compromised by taking a long draught of stout for he
[The Dead] [7146] came forward with three potatoes which she had reserved for him.
[The Dead] [7149] draught, "kindly forget my existence, ladies and gentlemen, for a
[The Dead] [7177] to the legitimate opera. One of her pupils had given her a pass for
[The Dead] [7200] suppose Caruso, for example, is quite as good, if not better than
[The Dead] [7208] "For me," said Aunt Kate, who had been picking a bone, "there
[The Dead] [7221] hearing of old Parkinson but he's too far back for me."
[The Dead] [7232] she received praises for it from all quarters She herself said that it
[The Dead] [7236] enough for you because, you know, I'm all brown."
[The Dead] [7240] had been left for him. Freddy Malins also took a stalk of celery and
[The Dead] [7242] thing for the blood and he was just then under doctor's care. Mrs.
[The Dead] [7247] for a penny-piece from their guests.
[The Dead] [7262] did it for.
[The Dead] [7270] best he could, that the monks were trying to make up for the sins
[The Dead] [7272] was not very clear for Mr. Browne grinned and said:
[The Dead] [7295] gently as a signal for silence. The silence came and Gabriel pushed
[The Dead] [7315] very pleasing task but a task for which I am afraid my poor powers
[The Dead] [7321] will for the deed and to lend me your attention for a few moments
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7358] enthusiastic for these new ideas and its enthusiasm, even when it is
[The Dead] [7387] together for a brief moment from the bustle and rush of our
[The Dead] [7407] For when I view them in turn, whether it be our chief hostess
[The Dead] [7432] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7433] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7434] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7447] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7448] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7449] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7591] bent down for the address. The confusion grew greater and the
[The Dead] [7597] contradictions and abundance of laughter. As for Freddy Malins he
[The Dead] [7614] "Make like a bird for Trinity College."
[The Dead] [7650] hand for them to be silent. The song seemed to be in the old Irish
[The Dead] [7698] "They say," said Mary Jane, "we haven't had snow like it for thirty
[The Dead] [7740] "Well, good-night, Aunt Kate, and thanks for the pleasant
[The Dead] [7783] was shimmering along the floor: he could not eat for happiness.
[The Dead] [7802] ecstasy. For the years, he felt, had not quenched his soul or hers.
[The Dead] [7851] She leaned for a moment on his arm in getting out of the cab and
[The Dead] [7870] arms about her hips and held her still, for his arms were trembling
[The Dead] [7891] The porter took up his candle again, but slowly, for he was
[The Dead] [7901] a large swinging mirror, unhooking her waist. Gabriel paused for a
[The Dead] [7954] come from the window. She stood before him for an instant,
[The Dead] [7964] over with happiness. Just when he was wishing for it she had come
[The Dead] [7988] arms across the bed-rail, hid her face. Gabriel stood stockstill for a
[The Dead] [8041] "What for?"
[The Dead] [8064] as a pennyboy for his aunts, a nervous, well-meaning
[The Dead] [8084] "I think he died for me," she answered.
[The Dead] [8091] again, for he felt that she would tell him of herself. Her hand was
[The Dead] [8103] She paused for a moment and sighed.
[The Dead] [8108] singing only for his health. He had a very good voice, poor
[The Dead] [8113] "And then when it came to the time for me to leave Galway and
[The Dead] [8119] She paused for a moment to get her voice under control, and then
[The Dead] [8143] held her hand for a moment longer, irresolutely, and then, shy of
[The Dead] [8154] Gabriel, leaning on his elbow, looked for a few moments
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how
[The Dead] [8162] that time of her first girlish beauty, a strange, friendly pity for her
[The Dead] [8165] face for which Michael Furey had braved death.
[The Dead] [8177] face for a moment when she was singing Arrayed for the Bridal.
[The Dead] [8182] would cast about in his mind for some words that might console
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her
[The Dead] [8208] come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the