Dubliners by James Joyce
had

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 810 occurrences of the word:   had

[The Sisters] [4] Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and
[The Sisters] [5] studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had
[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [10] world," and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were
[The Sisters] [12] myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my
[The Sisters] [48] news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [100] moist with spittle. But then I remembered that it had died of
[The Sisters] [120] disturbed to find myself at check. Had he not been dead I would
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [141] sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his
[The Sisters] [142] death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night
[The Sisters] [143] before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish
[The Sisters] [144] college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin
[The Sisters] [145] properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about
[The Sisters] [146] Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of
[The Sisters] [148] worn by the priest. Sometimes he had amused himself by putting
[The Sisters] [152] mysterious were certain institutions of the Church which I had
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [157] surprised when he told me that the fathers of the Church had
[The Sisters] [163] put me through the responses of the Mass which he had made me
[The Sisters] [168] which had made me feel uneasy in the beginning of our
[The Sisters] [172] tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream. I
[The Sisters] [173] remembered that I had noticed long velvet curtains and a swinging
[The Sisters] [174] lamp of antique fashion. I felt that I had been very far away, in
[The Sisters] [193] like pale thin flames. He had been coffined. Nannie gave the lead
[The Sisters] [231] the breath went out of him. He had a beautiful death, God be
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [263] Nannie had leaned her head against the sofa-pillow and seemed
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [313] together of a Sunday evening. He had his mind set on that.... Poor
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[An Encounter] [368] IT WAS Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us. He had a
[An Encounter] [385] Everyone was incredulous when it was reported that he had a
[An Encounter] [403] "This page or this page? This page Now, Dillon, up! 'Hardly had
[An Encounter] [404] the day' ... Go on! What day? 'Hardly had the day dawned' ... Have
[An Encounter] [454] my frail canvas shoes which I had diligently pipeclayed overnight
[An Encounter] [462] When I had been sitting there for five or ten minutes I saw
[An Encounter] [466] explained some improvements which he had made in it. I asked
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [508] had been scantily dosed to me at school gradually taking substance
[An Encounter] [516] watched the discharging of the graceful threemaster which we had
[An Encounter] [520] foreign sailors to see had any of them green eyes for I had some
[An Encounter] [529] Ringsend. The day had grown sultry, and in the windows of the
[An Encounter] [541] visiting the Pigeon House. We had to be home before four o'clock
[An Encounter] [543] regretfully at his catapult and I had to suggest going home by train
[An Encounter] [548] There was nobody but ourselves in the field. When we had lain on
[An Encounter] [558] We followed him with our eyes and saw that when he had gone on
[An Encounter] [567] would be a very hot summer and adding that the seasons had
[An Encounter] [573] we had read the poetry of Thomas Moore or the works of Sir
[An Encounter] [574] Walter Scott and Lord Lytton. I pretended that I had read every
[An Encounter] [581] He said he had all Sir Walter Scott's works and all Lord Lytton's
[An Encounter] [587] saw that he had great gaps in his mouth between his yellow teeth.
[An Encounter] [588] Then he asked us which of us had the most sweethearts. Mahony
[An Encounter] [589] mentioned lightly that he had three totties. The man asked me how
[An Encounter] [590] many I had. I answered that I had none. He did not believe me and
[An Encounter] [597] had lots of sweethearts.
[An Encounter] [607] nice soft hair they had and how soft their hands were and how all
[An Encounter] [612] had learned by heart or that, magnetised by some words of his own
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [626] remained silent when he had gone. After a silence of a few
[An Encounter] [641] down beside us again. Hardly had he sat down when Mahony,
[An Encounter] [642] catching sight of the cat which had escaped him, sprang up and
[An Encounter] [645] wall she had escaladed. Desisting from this, he began to wander
[An Encounter] [667] boy had a girl for a sweetheart and told lies about it then he would
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[An Encounter] [687] of my paltry stratagem. I had to call the name again before
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [702] The former tenant of our house, a priest, had died in the back
[Araby] [711] the late tenant's rusty bicycle-pump. He had been a very charitable
[Araby] [712] priest; in his will he had left all his money to institutions and the
[Araby] [715] When the short days of winter came dusk fell before we had well
[Araby] [716] eaten our dinners. When we met in the street the houses had grown
[Araby] [727] kitchen windows had filled the areas. If my uncle was seen turning
[Araby] [728] the corner we hid in the shadow until we had seen him safely
[Araby] [745] passed her. This happened morning after morning. I had never
[Araby] [751] had to go to carry some of the parcels. We walked through the
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [810] wandering thoughts together. I had hardly any patience with the
[Araby] [825] When I came home to dinner my uncle had not yet been home.
[Araby] [841] collected used stamps for some pious purpose. I had to endure the
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [852] him talking to himself and heard the hallstand rocking when it had
[Araby] [855] the money to go to the bazaar. He had forgotten.
[Araby] [864] My uncle said he was very sorry he had forgotten. He said he
[Araby] [866] dull boy." He asked me where I was going and, when I had told
[Araby] [897] Remembering with difficulty why I had come I went over to one of
[Eveline] [960] Tizzie Dunn was dead, too, and the Waters had gone back to
[Eveline] [965] objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years,
[Eveline] [967] would never see again those familiar objects from which she had
[Eveline] [969] had never found out the name of the priest whose yellowing
[Eveline] [972] Alacoque. He had been a school friend of her father. Whenever he
[Eveline] [978] She had consented to go away, to leave her home. Was that wise?
[Eveline] [980] she had shelter and food; she had those whom she had known all
[Eveline] [981] her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the
[Eveline] [983] when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she
[Eveline] [985] advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an
[Eveline] [997] mother had been. Even now, though she was over nineteen, she
[Eveline] [999] it was that that had given her the palpitations. When they were
[Eveline] [1000] growing up he had never gone for her like he used to go for Harry
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1006] invariable squabble for money on Saturday nights had begun to
[Eveline] [1010] squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to
[Eveline] [1013] end he would give her the money and ask her had she any intention
[Eveline] [1014] of buying Sunday's dinner. Then she had to rush out as quickly as
[Eveline] [1017] returning home late under her load of provisions. She had hard
[Eveline] [1019] children who had been left to hr charge went to school regularly
[Eveline] [1027] where he had a home waiting for her. How well she remembered
[Eveline] [1028] the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the
[Eveline] [1031] and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. Then they had
[Eveline] [1038] used to call her Poppens out of fun. First of all it had been an
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1040] him. He had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck boy
[Eveline] [1042] Canada. He told her the names of the ships he had been on and the
[Eveline] [1043] names of the different services. He had sailed through the Straits
[Eveline] [1045] had fallen on his feet in Buenos Ayres, he said, and had come over
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1047] found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say
[Eveline] [1052] One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to
[Eveline] [1057] father. Ernest had been her favourite but she liked Harry too. Her
[Eveline] [1059] Sometimes he could be very nice. Not long before, when she had
[Eveline] [1060] been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[Eveline] [1074] melancholy air of Italy. The organ-player had been ordered to go
[Eveline] [1090] had a right to happiness. Frank would take her in his arms, fold her
[Eveline] [1103] steaming towards Buenos Ayres. Their passage had been booked.
[Eveline] [1104] Could she still draw back after all he had done for her? Her
[After the Race] [1132] Inchicore sightseers had gathered in clumps to watch the cars
[After the Race] [1139] The French, moreover, were virtual victors. Their team had
[After the Race] [1140] finished solidly; they had been placed second and third and the
[After the Race] [1151] was in good humour because he had unexpectedly received some
[After the Race] [1157] he had had a very satisfactory luncheon; and besides he was an
[After the Race] [1163] had begun life as an advanced Nationalist, had modified his views
[After the Race] [1164] early. He had made his money as a butcher in Kingstown and by
[After the Race] [1165] opening shops in Dublin and in the suburbs he had made his
[After the Race] [1166] money many times over. He had also been fortunate enough to
[After the Race] [1167] secure some of the police contracts and in the end he had become
[After the Race] [1169] merchant prince. He had sent his son to England to be educated in
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[After the Race] [1172] took to bad courses for a while. He had money and he was popular;
[After the Race] [1174] circles. Then he had been sent for a term to Cambridge to see a
[After the Race] [1176] excess, had paid his bills and brought him home. It was at
[After the Race] [1177] Cambridge that he had met Segouin. They were not much more
[After the Race] [1179] society of one who had seen so much of the world and was reputed
[After the Race] [1181] father agreed) was well worth knowing, even if he had not been
[After the Race] [1190] Jimmy had to strain forward to catch the quick phrase. This was
[After the Race] [1191] not altogether pleasant for him, as he had nearly always to make a
[After the Race] [1198] Jimmy's excitement. He had been seen by many of his friends that
[After the Race] [1200] had presented him to one of the French competitors and, in answer
[After the Race] [1202] driver had disclosed a line of shining white teeth. It was pleasant
[After the Race] [1204] nudges and significant looks. Then as to money--he really had a
[After the Race] [1208] it had been got together. This knowledge had previously kept his
[After the Race] [1209] bills within the limits of reasonable recklessness, and if he had
[After the Race] [1210] been so conscious of the labour latent in money when there had
[After the Race] [1215] Of course, the investment was a good one and Segouin had
[After the Race] [1218] of the concern. Jimmy had a respect for his father's shrewdness in
[After the Race] [1219] business matters and in this case it had been his father who had
[After the Race] [1221] business, pots of money. Moreover Segouin had the unmistakable
[After the Race] [1223] car in which he sat. How smoothly it ran. In what style they had
[After the Race] [1242] In Jimmy's house this dinner had been pronounced an occasion. A
[After the Race] [1255] The dinner was excellent, exquisite. Segouin, Jimmy decided, had
[After the Race] [1257] Englishman named Routh whom Jimmy had seen with Segouin at
[After the Race] [1264] the conversation. The five young men had various tastes and their
[After the Race] [1265] tongues had been loosened. Villona, with immense respect, began
[After the Race] [1277] glass to Humanity and, when the toast had been drunk, he threw
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1342] The piano had stopped; Villona must have gone up on deck. It was
[After the Race] [1346] of course. How much had he written away? The men rose to their
[After the Race] [1349] bundled together. They began then to gather in what they had won.
[Two Gallants] [1363] THE grey warm evening of August had descended upon the city
[Two Gallants] [1382] rearranged the light waterproof which he had slung over one
[Two Gallants] [1386] face, when the waves of expression had passed over it, had a
[Two Gallants] [1389] When he was quite sure that the narrative had ended he laughed
[Two Gallants] [1400] He became serious and silent when he had said this. His tongue
[Two Gallants] [1401] was tired for he had been talking all the afternoon in a
[Two Gallants] [1404] had always prevented his friends from forming any general policy
[Two Gallants] [1405] against him. He had a brave manner of coming up to a party of
[Two Gallants] [1444] of police and he had inherited his father's frame and gut. He
[Two Gallants] [1448] upon it sideways, looked like a bulb which had grown out of
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1459] and what he had said to settle the matter. When he reported these
[Two Gallants] [1485] himself he had the habit of leaving his flattery open to the
[Two Gallants] [1486] interpretation of raillery. But Corley had not a subtle mind.
[Two Gallants] [1573] His harp, too, heedless that her coverings had fallen about her
[Two Gallants] [1605] Corley had already thrown one leg over the chains when Lenehan
[Two Gallants] [1620] of his boots had something of the conqueror in them. He
[Two Gallants] [1630] young woman's appearance. She had her Sunday finery on. Her
[Two Gallants] [1635] ragged black boa. The ends of her tulle collarette had been
[Two Gallants] [1640] were blunt. She had broad nostrils, a straggling mouth which lay
[Two Gallants] [1653] the pair in view until he had seen them climbing the stairs of the
[Two Gallants] [1655] had come.
[Two Gallants] [1659] allowed his hand to run along them. The air which the harpist had
[Two Gallants] [1684] He was hungry for, except some biscuits which he had asked two
[Two Gallants] [1685] grudging curates to bring him, he had eaten nothing since
[Two Gallants] [1697] had been followed by a pause of talk. His face was heated. To
[Two Gallants] [1704] the shop mentally. When he had eaten all the peas he sipped his
[Two Gallants] [1714] a good dinner to sit down to. He had walked the streets long
[Two Gallants] [1716] were worth: he knew the girls too. Experience had embittered his
[Two Gallants] [1717] heart against the world. But all hope had not left him. He felt
[Two Gallants] [1718] better after having eaten than he had felt before, less weary of his
[Two Gallants] [1728] from all his walking. His friends asked him had he seen Corley and
[Two Gallants] [1729] what was the latest. He replied that he had spent the day with
[Two Gallants] [1732] One said that he had seen Mac an hour before in Westmoreland
[Two Gallants] [1733] Street. At this Lenehan said that he had been with Mac the night
[Two Gallants] [1734] before in Egan's. The young man who had seen Mac in
[Two Gallants] [1735] Westmoreland Street asked was it true that Mac had won a bit over
[Two Gallants] [1736] a billiard match. Lenehan did not know: he said that Holohan had
[Two Gallants] [1741] Grafton Street. The crowd of girls and young men had thinned and
[Two Gallants] [1748] cigarettes which he had reserved and lit it. He leaned against the
[Two Gallants] [1752] His mind became active again. He wondered had Corley managed
[Two Gallants] [1753] it successfully. He wondered if he had asked her yet or if he would
[Two Gallants] [1758] that perhaps Corley had seen her home by another way and given
[Two Gallants] [1760] them. Yet it was surely half-an-hour since he had seen the clock of
[Two Gallants] [1789] house which the young woman had entered to see that he was not
[Two Gallants] [1795] Corley turned his head to see who had called him, and then
[Two Gallants] [1806] They had reached the corner of Ely Place. Still without answering,
[The Boarding House] [1823] had married her father's foreman and opened a butcher's shop near
[The Boarding House] [1830] had to sleep a neighbour's house.
[The Boarding House] [1839] Mrs. Mooney, who had taken what remained of her money out of
[The Boarding House] [1841] Street, was a big imposing woman. Her house had a floating
[The Boarding House] [1855] son, who was clerk to a commission agent in Fleet Street, had the
[The Boarding House] [1858] met his friends he had always a good one to tell them and he was
[The Boarding House] [1871] Polly was a slim girl of nineteen; she had light soft hair and a
[The Boarding House] [1873] through them, had a habit of glancing upwards when she spoke
[The Boarding House] [1875] Mrs. Mooney had first sent her daughter to be a typist in a
[The Boarding House] [1878] word to his daughter, she had taken her daughter home again and
[The Boarding House] [1891] persistent silence could not be misunderstood. There had been no
[The Boarding House] [1898] deals with meat: and in this case she had made up her mind.
[The Boarding House] [1915] began to reconstruct the interview which she had had the night
[The Boarding House] [1916] before with Polly. Things were as she had suspected: she had been
[The Boarding House] [1917] frank in her questions and Polly had been frank in her answers.
[The Boarding House] [1918] Both had been somewhat awkward, of course. She had been made
[The Boarding House] [1920] fashion or to seem to have connived and Polly had been made
[The Boarding House] [1923] in her wise innocence she had divined the intention behind her
[The Boarding House] [1927] mantelpiece as soon as she had become aware through her revery
[The Boarding House] [1928] that the bells of George's Church had stopped ringing. It was
[The Boarding House] [1932] she had all the weight of social opinion on her side: she was an
[The Boarding House] [1933] outraged mother. She had allowed him to live beneath her roof,
[The Boarding House] [1934] assuming that he was a man of honour and he had simply abused
[The Boarding House] [1937] be his excuse since he was a man who had seen something of the
[The Boarding House] [1938] world. He had simply taken advantage of Polly's youth and
[The Boarding House] [1943] the man: he can go his ways as if nothing had happened, having
[The Boarding House] [1944] had his moment of pleasure, but the girl has to bear the brunt.
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1953] like the others. If it had been Mr. Sheridan or Mr. Meade or
[The Boarding House] [1956] something of the affair; details had been invented by some.
[The Boarding House] [1957] Besides, he had been employed for thirteen years in a great
[The Boarding House] [1960] well. She knew he had a good screw for one thing and she
[The Boarding House] [1961] suspected he had a bit of stuff put by.
[The Boarding House] [1968] Mr. Doran was very anxious indeed this Sunday morning. He had
[The Boarding House] [1969] made two attempts to shave but his hand had been so unsteady that
[The Boarding House] [1970] he had been obliged to desist. Three days' reddish beard fringed his
[The Boarding House] [1972] so that he had to take them off and polish them with his
[The Boarding House] [1974] night before was a cause of acute pain to him; the priest had drawn
[The Boarding House] [1975] out every ridiculous detail of the affair and in the end had so
[The Boarding House] [1986] diligence thrown away! As a young man he had sown his wild oats,
[The Boarding House] [1987] of course; he had boasted of his free-thinking and denied the
[The Boarding House] [1991] duties and for nine-tenths of the year lived a regular life. He had
[The Boarding House] [1995] certain fame. He had a notion that he was being had. He could
[The Boarding House] [2000] she had done. Of course he had done it too. His instinct urged him
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2018] It was not altogether his fault that it had happened. He
[The Boarding House] [2020] the first casual caresses her dress, her breath, her fingers had given
[The Boarding House] [2021] him. Then late one night as he was undressing for she had tapped
[The Boarding House] [2023] had been blown out by a gust. It was her bath night. She wore a
[The Boarding House] [2054] moisture that he had to take them off and polish them. He longed
[The Boarding House] [2067] artistes, a little blond Londoner, had made a rather free allusion to
[The Boarding House] [2068] Polly. The reunion had been almost broken up on account of Jack's
[The Boarding House] [2101] Then she remembered what she had been waiting for.
[A Little Cloud] [2105] EIGHT years before he had seen his friend off at the North Wall
[A Little Cloud] [2106] and wished him godspeed. Gallaher had got on. You could tell that
[A Little Cloud] [2108] accent. Few fellows had talents like his and fewer still could
[A Little Cloud] [2110] place and he had deserved to win. It was something to have a
[A Little Cloud] [2113] Little Chandler's thoughts ever since lunch-time had been of his
[A Little Cloud] [2125] those eight years had brought. The friend whom he had known
[A Little Cloud] [2126] under a shabby and necessitous guise had become a brilliant figure
[A Little Cloud] [2137] the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.
[A Little Cloud] [2140] had bought them in his bachelor days and many an evening, as he
[A Little Cloud] [2141] sat in the little room off the hall, he had been tempted to take one
[A Little Cloud] [2143] shyness had always held him back; and so the books had remained
[A Little Cloud] [2147] When his hour had struck he stood up and took leave of his desk
[A Little Cloud] [2151] the air had grown sharp. A horde of grimy children populated the
[A Little Cloud] [2157] had roystered. No memory of the past touched him, for his mind
[A Little Cloud] [2160] He had never been in Corless's but he knew the value of the name.
[A Little Cloud] [2162] drink liqueurs; and he had heard that the waiters there spoke
[A Little Cloud] [2163] French and German. Walking swiftly by at night he had seen cabs
[A Little Cloud] [2167] dresses, when they touched earth, like alarmed Atalantas. He had
[A Little Cloud] [2184] money on all sides. In the end he had got mixed up in some shady
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2213] thought that a poetic moment had touched him took life within
[A Little Cloud] [2239] He pursued his revery so ardently that he passed his street and had
[A Little Cloud] [2250] he saw that nobody had turned to look at him: and there, sure
[A Little Cloud] [2311] mornings when I had a sore head and a fur on my tongue. You'd
[A Little Cloud] [2341] the barman had removed their glasses, "and I've been to all the
[A Little Cloud] [2349] him. There was something vulgar in his friend which he had not
[A Little Cloud] [2353] after all, Gallaher had lived, he had seen the world. Little Chandler
[A Little Cloud] [2376] Ignatius Gallaher drank off his whisky and shook his had.
[A Little Cloud] [2402] some time from the clouds of smoke in which he had taken refuge,
[A Little Cloud] [2410] to Berlin. Some things he could not vouch for (his friends had told
[A Little Cloud] [2411] him), but of others he had had personal experience. He spared
[A Little Cloud] [2428] had... tasted the joys of connubial bliss. Two years ago, wasn't it?"
[A Little Cloud] [2502] Little Chandler ordered the drinks. The blush which had risen to
[A Little Cloud] [2505] Three small whiskies had gone to his head and Gallaher's strong
[A Little Cloud] [2506] cigar had confused his mind, for he was a delicate and abstinent
[A Little Cloud] [2514] something better than his friend had ever done, or could ever do,
[A Little Cloud] [2530] over the rim of his glass. When he had drunk he smacked his lips
[A Little Cloud] [2547] He had slightly emphasised his tone and he was aware that he had
[A Little Cloud] [2548] betrayed himself; but, though the colour had heightened in his
[A Little Cloud] [2580] the evening to help. But Monica had gone home long ago. It was a
[A Little Cloud] [2581] quarter to nine. Little Chandler had come home late for tea and,
[A Little Cloud] [2582] moreover, he had forgotten to bring Annie home the parcel of
[A Little Cloud] [2596] blouse which he had brought her home as a present one Saturday.
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2598] nervousness it had cost him! How he had suffered that day, waiting
[A Little Cloud] [2619] them, no rapture. He thought of what Gallaher had said about rich
[A Little Cloud] [2621] of passion, of voluptuous longing!... Why had he married the eyes
[A Little Cloud] [2626] he had bought for his house on the hire system. Annie had chosen
[A Little Cloud] [2668] The child stopped for an instant, had a spasm of fright and began
[Counterparts] [2724] bulk. He had a hanging face, dark wine-coloured, with fair
[Counterparts] [2775] he had been unaware of the man's presence till that moment, he
[Counterparts] [2792] the ink but he continued to stare stupidly at the last words he had
[Counterparts] [2818] retreated out of the snug as furtively as he had entered it.
[Counterparts] [2821] of February and the lamps in Eustace Street had been lit. The man
[Counterparts] [2825] Delacour had come while he was out in O'Neill's. He crammed his
[Counterparts] [2842] porter he had gulped down so hastily confused the man and, as he
[Counterparts] [2857] great black feather in her hat. Mr. Alleyne had swivelled his chair
[Counterparts] [2875] five he had still fourteen pages to write. Blast it! He couldn't finish
[Counterparts] [2878] Bernard instead of Bernard Bodley and had to begin again on a
[Counterparts] [2889] His imagination had so abstracted him that his name was called
[Counterparts] [2891] standing outside the counter and all the clerks had turn round in
[Counterparts] [2895] he had made a faithful copy. The tirade continued: it was so bitter
[Counterparts] [2908] had found a felicitous moment:
[Counterparts] [2933] that his position was bad enough. He had been obliged to offer an
[Counterparts] [2936] remember the way in which Mr. Alleyne had hounded little Peake
[Counterparts] [2940] rest; his life would be a hell to him. He had made a proper fool of
[Counterparts] [2942] they had never pulled together from the first, he and Mr. Alleyne,
[Counterparts] [2943] ever since the day Mr. Alleyne had overheard him mimicking his
[Counterparts] [2945] had been the beginning of it. He might have tried Higgins for the
[Counterparts] [2946] money, but sure Higgins never had anything for himself. A man
[Counterparts] [2950] public-house. The fog had begun to chill him and he wondered
[Counterparts] [2953] somewhere or other: he had spent his last penny for the g.p. and
[Counterparts] [2984] tailors of malt, hot, all round and told the story of the retort he had
[Counterparts] [2987] the eclogues, he had to admit that it was not as clever as
[Counterparts] [2992] Higgins! Of course he had to join in with the others. The men
[Counterparts] [3002] When that round was over there was a pause. O'Halloran had
[Counterparts] [3016] had definite notions of what was what, asked the boys would they
[Counterparts] [3034] of bitter this time. Funds were getting low but they had enough to
[Counterparts] [3051] want of money and cursed all the rounds he had stood, particularly
[Counterparts] [3052] all the whiskies and Apolinaris which he had stood to Weathers. If
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Counterparts] [3103] and discontented; he did not even feel drunk; and he had only
[Counterparts] [3104] twopence in his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for
[Counterparts] [3106] he had not even got drunk. He began to feel thirsty again and he
[Counterparts] [3107] longed to be back again in the hot reeking public-house. He had
[Counterparts] [3110] the woman in the big hat who had brushed against him and said
[Counterparts] [3123] They had five children. A little boy came running down the stairs.
[Clay] [3182] THE matron had given her leave to go out as soon as the women's
[Clay] [3188] that they had been cut into long thick even slices and were ready to
[Clay] [3189] be handed round at tea. Maria had cut them herself.
[Clay] [3191] Maria was a very, very small person indeed but she had a very long
[Clay] [3195] always succeeded in making peace. One day the matron had said to
[Clay] [3200] And the sub-matron and two of the Board ladies had heard the
[Clay] [3202] wouldn't do to the dummy who had charge of the irons if it wasn't
[Clay] [3211] because Joe had brought it to her five years before when he and
[Clay] [3212] Alphy had gone to Belfast on a Whit-Monday trip. In the purse
[Clay] [3219] Often he had wanted her to go and live with them;-but she would
[Clay] [3221] with her) and she had become accustomed to the life of the
[Clay] [3222] laundry. Joe was a good fellow. She had nursed him and Alphy
[Clay] [3227] After the break-up at home the boys had got her that position in the
[Clay] [3231] people to live with. Then she had her plants in the conservatory
[Clay] [3232] and she liked looking after them. She had lovely ferns and
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3249] many Hallow Eves, Maria had to laugh and say she didn't want any
[Clay] [3258] well though, of course, she had the notions of a common woman.
[Clay] [3260] But wasn't Maria glad when the women had finished their tea and
[Clay] [3261] the cook and the dummy had begun to clear away the tea- things!
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3275] had to sit on the little stool at the end of the car, facing all the
[Clay] [3293] decided to buy some plumcake but Downes's plumcake had not
[Clay] [3307] wore a brown hard hat; he had a square red face and a greyish
[Clay] [3324] children had their Sunday dresses on. There were two big girls in
[Clay] [3332] But Maria said she had brought something special for papa and
[Clay] [3336] could she find it. Then she asked all the children had any of them
[Clay] [3339] accused of stealing. Everybody had a solution for the mystery and
[Clay] [3340] Mrs. Donnelly said it was plain that Maria had left it behind her in
[Clay] [3342] the greyish moustache had made her, coloured with shame and
[Clay] [3344] little surprise and of the two and fourpence she had thrown away
[Clay] [3349] repeating for her a smart answer which he had made to the
[Clay] [3351] the answer he had made but she said that the manager must have
[Clay] [3369] she had mentioned the matter. Mrs. Donnelly told her husband it
[Clay] [3374] open some more stout. The two next-door girls had arranged some
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3402] convent before the year was out because she had got the
[Clay] [3403] prayer-book. Maria had never seen Joe so nice to her as he was
[Clay] [3409] songs. Mrs. Donnelly said "Do, please, Maria!" and so Maria had
[Clay] [3422] I had riches too great to count; could boast
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[Clay] [3433] end he had to ask his wife to tell him where the corkscrew was.
[A Painful Case] [3443] uncarpeted room were free from pictures. He had himself bought
[A Painful Case] [3447] bookcase had been made in an alcove by means of shelves of
[A Painful Case] [3461] advertisement for Bile Beans had been pasted on to the first sheet.
[A Painful Case] [3476] his own acts with doubtful side-glasses. He had an odd
[A Painful Case] [3482] He had been for many years cashier of a private bank in Baggot
[A Painful Case] [3494] He had neither companions nor friends, church nor creed. He lived
[A Painful Case] [3516] had remained intelligent. It was an oval face with strongly marked
[A Painful Case] [3530] great-great-grandfather had come from Leghorn. Her husband was
[A Painful Case] [3532] and they had one child.
[A Painful Case] [3537] their walks together. Mr. Duffy, however, had a distaste for
[A Painful Case] [3541] question. He had dismissed his wife so sincerely from his gallery
[A Painful Case] [3544] out giving music lessons Mr. Duffy had many opportunities of
[A Painful Case] [3545] enjoying the lady's society. Neither he nor she had had any such
[A Painful Case] [3554] for some time he had assisted at the meetings of an Irish Socialist
[A Painful Case] [3555] Party where he had felt himself a unique figure amidst a score of
[A Painful Case] [3557] party had divided into three sections, each under its own leader
[A Painful Case] [3558] and in its own garret, he had discontinued his attendances. The
[A Painful Case] [3586] these discourses was that one night during which she had shown
[A Painful Case] [3622] themselves on a paragraph in the evening paper which he had
[A Painful Case] [3658] James Lennon, driver of the engine, stated that he had been in the
[A Painful Case] [3674] deceased lying on the platform apparently dead. He had the body
[A Painful Case] [3680] stated that the deceased had two lower ribs fractured and had
[A Painful Case] [3682] the head had been injured in the fall. The injuries were not
[A Painful Case] [3684] opinion, had been probably due to shock and sudden failure of the
[A Painful Case] [3688] expressed his deep regret at the accident. The company had always
[A Painful Case] [3691] use of patent spring gates at level crossings. The deceased had
[A Painful Case] [3698] wife. He was not in Dublin at the time of the accident as he had
[A Painful Case] [3699] arrived only that morning from Rotterdam. They had been married
[A Painful Case] [3700] for twenty-two years and had lived happily until about two years
[A Painful Case] [3703] Miss Mary Sinico said that of late her mother had been in the habit
[A Painful Case] [3704] of going out at night to buy spirits. She, witness, had often tried to
[A Painful Case] [3705] reason with her mother and had induced her to join a League. She
[A Painful Case] [3725] he had ever spoken to her of what he held sacred. The threadbare
[A Painful Case] [3728] vulgar death attacked his stomach. Not merely had she degraded
[A Painful Case] [3729] herself; she had degraded him. He saw the squalid tract of her vice,
[A Painful Case] [3731] the hobbling wretches whom he had seen carrying cans and bottles
[A Painful Case] [3733] had been unfit to live, without any strength of purpose, an easy
[A Painful Case] [3736] had deceived himself so utterly about her? He remembered her
[A Painful Case] [3738] had ever done. He had no difficulty now in approving of the course
[A Painful Case] [3739] he had taken.
[A Painful Case] [3742] hand touched his. The shock which had first attacked his stomach
[A Painful Case] [3763] realised that she was dead, that she had ceased to exist, that she
[A Painful Case] [3764] had become a memory. He began to feel ill at ease. He asked
[A Painful Case] [3767] her openly. He had done what seemed to him best. How was he to
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[A Painful Case] [3778] ear, her hand touch his. He stood still to listen. Why had he
[A Painful Case] [3779] withheld life from her? Why had he sentenced her to death? He
[A Painful Case] [3788] had been outcast from life's feast. One human being had seemed to
[A Painful Case] [3789] love him and he had denied her life and happiness: he had
[A Painful Case] [3800] He turned back the way he had come, the rhythm of the engine
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3818] cinders had caught he laid the piece of cardboard against the wall,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3824] disfigured by many blotches and pimples, had just brought the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3854] Mr. O'Connor had been engaged by Tierney's agent to canvass one
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3858] caretaker. They had been sitting thus since e short day had grown
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4082] who had been staring moodily into the fire, called out suddenly:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4138] and thank the Almighty Christ he had a country to sell."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4150] His face, shining with raindrops, had the appearance of damp
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4339] The old man distributed the three bottles which he had opened and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4357] his sloping figure. He had a big face which resembled a young ox's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4359] other man, who was much younger and frailer, had a thin,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4397] sufficient in itself, was that he had nothing to say; the second
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4399] had been a canvasser for Wilkins, the Conservative, but when the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4400] Conservatives had withdrawn their man and, choosing the lesser of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4401] two evils, given their support to the Nationalist candidate, he had
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4547] He would have had his Erin famed,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4571] They had their way: they laid him low.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4581] Mr. Hynes sat down again on the table. When he had finished his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4584] it had ceased all the auditors drank from their bottles in silence.
[A Mother] [4600] MR HOLOHAN, assistant secretary of the Eire Abu Society, had
[A Mother] [4603] series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called
[A Mother] [4608] Miss Devlin had become Mrs. Kearney out of spite. She had been
[A Mother] [4609] educated in a high-class convent, where she had learned French
[A Mother] [4652] friends; and, when they had played every little counter of gossip,
[A Mother] [4671] Kearney helped him. She had tact. She knew what artistes should
[A Mother] [4702] idleness. At first she wondered had she mistaken the hour. No, it
[A Mother] [4727] When she had an opportunity, she called Mr. Holohan aside and
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4736] committee, he said, had decided to let the first three concerts go as
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [4768] her daughter had signed for four concerts and that, of course,
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4793] She was glad that he had suggested coming with her. She thought
[A Mother] [4820] Mrs. Kearney had to go back to the dressing-room.
[A Mother] [4822] The artistes were arriving. The bass and the second tenor had
[A Mother] [4825] in an office in the city and, as a boy, he had sung prolonged bass
[A Mother] [4826] notes in the resounding hall. From this humble state he had raised
[A Mother] [4827] himself until he had become a first-rate artiste. He had appeared in
[A Mother] [4828] grand opera. One night, when an operatic artiste had fallen ill, he
[A Mother] [4829] had undertaken the part of the king in the opera of Maritana at the
[A Mother] [4837] every year for prizes at the Feis Ceoil. On his fourth trial he had
[A Mother] [4866] Miss Healy had to smile. Mr. Holohan limped into the
[A Mother] [4888] said that Mr. Fitzpatrick had charge of that. Mrs. Kearney said that
[A Mother] [4889] she didn't know anything about Mr. Fitzpatrick. Her daughter had
[A Mother] [4905] suffused. The room was lively. Two men in outdoor dress had
[A Mother] [4908] O'Madden Burke. The Freeman man had come in to say that he
[A Mother] [4909] could not wait for the concert as he had to report the lecture which
[A Mother] [4914] in his hand and the aroma of cigar smoke floated near him. He had
[A Mother] [4938] gentlemen was Mr. O'Madden Burke, who had found out the room
[A Mother] [4946] Kearney was speaking so animatedly to her husband that he had to
[A Mother] [4948] dressing-room had become strained. Mr. Bell, the first item, stood
[A Mother] [4956] audience would think that he had come late.
[A Mother] [4976] The room was silent. When the strain of the silence had become
[A Mother] [4981] The baritone had not seen her but he had been told that she was
[A Mother] [4988] The noise in the auditorium had risen to a clamour when Mr.
[A Mother] [5006] looked as if she had been resurrected from an old stage-wardrobe
[A Mother] [5018] O'Madden Burke said it was the most scandalous exhibition he had
[A Mother] [5022] He had been paid his money and wished to be at peace with men.
[A Mother] [5031] Mr. Bell, Miss Healy and the young lady who had to recite the
[A Mother] [5032] patriotic piece. Mrs. Kearney said that the Committee had treated
[A Mother] [5033] her scandalously. She had spared neither trouble nor expense and
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[A Mother] [5043] to the second tenor who said he thought she had not been well
[A Mother] [5046] great friend of Kathleen's and the Kearneys had often invited her to
[A Mother] [5084] everyone approved of what the committee had done. She stood at
[A Mother] [5088] approach her. But Miss Healy had kindly consented to play one or
[A Mother] [5089] two accompaniments. Mrs. Kearney had to stand aside to allow the
[Grace] [5118] of the stairs down which he had fallen. They succeeded in turning
[Grace] [5119] him over. His hat had rolled a few yards away and his clothes were
[Grace] [5120] smeared with the filth and ooze of the floor on which he had lain,
[Grace] [5129] knew who he was but one of the curates said he had served the
[Grace] [5143] dark medal of blood had formed itself near the man's head on the
[Grace] [5149] who had carried him upstairs held a dinged silk hat in his hand.
[Grace] [5151] man was or where had his friends gone. The door of the bar
[Grace] [5152] opened and an immense constable entered. A crowd which had
[Grace] [5241] The shock and the incipient pain had partly sobered him.
[Grace] [5256] accident had happened.
[Grace] [5277] believed in the dignity of its calling. He had never been seen in the
[Grace] [5282] mimicry. Modern business methods had spared him only so far as
[Grace] [5295] was mitigated by the fact that certain of those friends who had
[Grace] [5314] responsible, that he had come on the scene by the merest accident.
[Grace] [5362] she had celebrated her silver wedding and renewed her intimacy
[Grace] [5364] accompaniment. In her days of courtship, Mr. Kernan had seemed
[Grace] [5367] recalled with vivid pleasure how she had passed out of the Star of
[Grace] [5371] his other arm. After three weeks she had found a wife's life
[Grace] [5373] unbearable, she had become a mother. The part of mother
[Grace] [5375] years she had kept house shrewdly for her husband. Her two eldest
[Grace] [5385] breakfast. There were worse husbands. He had never been violent
[Grace] [5386] since the boys had grown up, and she knew that he would walk to
[Grace] [5393] occasional stinging pain of which had made him somewhat
[Grace] [5401] his friends, Mr. Cunningham, Mr. M'Coy and Mr. Power had
[Grace] [5404] Mr. Kernan came of Protestant stock and, though he had been
[Grace] [5405] converted to the Catholic faith at the time of his marriage, he had
[Grace] [5411] happy. People had great sympathy with him, for it was known that
[Grace] [5412] he had married an unpresentable woman who was an incurable
[Grace] [5413] drunkard. He had set up house for her six times; and each time she
[Grace] [5414] had pawned the furniture on him.
[Grace] [5416] Everyone had respect for poor Martin Cunningham. He was a
[Grace] [5419] association with cases in the police courts, had been tempered by
[Grace] [5424] When the plot had been disclosed to her, Mrs. Kernan had said:
[Grace] [5428] After a quarter of a century of married life, she had very few
[Grace] [5443] that he had once known a similar case. A man of seventy had
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5454] Mr. M'Coy had been at one time a tenor of some reputation. His
[Grace] [5455] wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play
[Grace] [5456] the piano at low terms. His line of life had not been the shortest
[Grace] [5457] distance between two points and for short periods he had been
[Grace] [5458] driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland
[Grace] [5462] Sub-Sheriff, and he had recently become secretary to the City
[Grace] [5504] was known that the speaker had secret sources of information. In
[Grace] [5505] this case the monosyllable had a moral intention. Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5510] his fellow-travellers had never consented to overlook his origin.
[Grace] [5511] He had begun life as an obscure financier by lending small sums of
[Grace] [5512] money to workmen at usurious interest. Later on he had become
[Grace] [5514] Liffey Loan Bank. Though he had never embraced more than the
[Grace] [5515] Jewish ethical code, his fellow-Catholics, whenever they had
[Grace] [5524] his friends to think there had been some mistake, that Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5525] and he had missed each other. His friends, who knew quite well
[Grace] [5551] straight-laced, but he could not forget that Mr. M'Coy had recently
[Grace] [5554] than he resented the fact that he had been victimised he resented
[Grace] [5556] therefore, as if Mr. Kernan had asked it.
[Grace] [5577] conversation by any door, pretended that he had never heard the
[Grace] [5717] Order. Every other order of the Church had to be reformed at some
[Grace] [5751] impressed. He had a high opinion of Mr. Cunningham as a judge
[Grace] [5844] had failed in business in a licensed house in the city because his
[Grace] [5845] financial condition had constrained him to tie himself to
[Grace] [5846] second-class distillers and brewers. He had opened a small shop on
[Grace] [5890] "He had a strong face," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5960] enough to go round, pleaded that he had not finished his first
[Grace] [6003] moment John MacHale, who had been arguing and arguing against
[Grace] [6008] "Credo!" said Mr. Cunningham "That showed the faith he had. He
[Grace] [6015] Mr. Cunningham's words had built up the vast image of the church
[Grace] [6016] in the minds of his hearers. His deep, raucous voice had thrilled
[Grace] [6041] properly taped, my lad. He had an eye like a hawk."
[Grace] [6128] behind him sat Mr. Power and Mr. Fogarty. Mr. M'Coy had tried
[Grace] [6130] when the party had settled down in the form of a quincunx, he had
[Grace] [6131] tried unsuccessfully to make comic remarks. As these had not been
[Grace] [6132] well received, he had desisted. Even he was sensible of the
[Grace] [6143] Kernan's, who had been at one time a considerable commercial
[Grace] [6145] began to feel more at home. His hat, which had been rehabilitated
[Grace] [6176] Jesus Christ. But, he told his hearers, the text had seemed to him
[Grace] [6199] understood the temptations of this life. We might have had, we all
[Grace] [6200] had from time to time, our temptations: we might have, we all had,
[The Dead] [6217] Hardly had she brought one gentleman into the little pantry behind
[The Dead] [6219] than the wheezy hall-door bell clanged again and she had to
[The Dead] [6221] for her she had not to attend to the ladies also. But Miss Kate and
[The Dead] [6222] Miss Julia had thought of that and had converted the bathroom
[The Dead] [6226] calling down to Lily to ask her who had come.
[The Dead] [6232] pupils too. Never once had it fallen flat. For years and years it had
[The Dead] [6234] since Kate and Julia, after the death of their brother Pat, had left
[The Dead] [6237] upper part of which they had rented from Mr. Fulham, the
[The Dead] [6240] was now the main prop of the household, for she had the organ in
[The Dead] [6241] Haddington Road. She had been through the Academy and gave a
[The Dead] [6256] Of course, they had good reason to be fussy on such a night. And
[The Dead] [6264] every two minutes to the banisters to ask Lily had Gabriel or
[The Dead] [6296] She had preceded him into the pantry to help him off with his
[The Dead] [6297] overcoat. Gabriel smiled at the three syllables she had given his
[The Dead] [6300] made her look still paler. Gabriel had known her when she was a
[The Dead] [6324] Gabriel coloured, as if he felt he had made a mistake and, without
[The Dead] [6337] When he had flicked lustre into his shoes he stood up and pulled
[The Dead] [6352] The girl, seeing that he had gained the stairs, called out after him:
[The Dead] [6359] sudden retort. It had cast a gloom over him which he tried to dispel
[The Dead] [6362] had made for his speech. He was undecided about the lines from
[The Dead] [6371] had failed with the girl in the pantry. He had taken up a wrong
[The Dead] [6384] apple, and her hair, braided in the same old-fashioned way, had not
[The Dead] [6388] the son of their dead elder sister, Ellen, who had married T. J.
[The Dead] [6394] "No," said Gabriel, turning to his wife, "we had quite enough of
[The Dead] [6417] whose admiring and happy eyes had been wandering from her
[The Dead] [6467] she broke off suddenly to gaze after her sister, who had wandered
[The Dead] [6473] Julia, who had gone half way down one flight, came back and
[The Dead] [6479] pianist told that the waltz had ended. The drawing-room door was
[The Dead] [6544] His hot face had leaned forward a little too confidentially and he
[The Dead] [6545] had assumed a very low Dublin accent so that the young ladies,
[The Dead] [6548] name of the pretty waltz she had played; and Mr. Browne, seeing
[The Dead] [6580] As the piano had twice begun the prelude to the first figure Mary
[The Dead] [6581] Jane led her recruits quickly from the room. They had hardly gone
[The Dead] [6589] sister and said, simply, as if the question had surprised her:
[The Dead] [6597] hanging lobes of his ears and at the wide wings of his nose. He had
[The Dead] [6601] high key at a story which he had been telling Gabriel on the stairs
[The Dead] [6611] repeat in an undertone the story he had just told to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6626] Browne nodded in answer and, when she had gone, said to Freddy
[The Dead] [6639] glass of whisky while Freddy Malins exploded, before he had well
[The Dead] [6648] drawing-room. He liked music but the piece she was playing had
[The Dead] [6649] no melody for him and he doubted whether it had any melody for
[The Dead] [6650] the other listeners, though they had begged Mary Jane to play
[The Dead] [6651] something. Four young men, who had come from the
[The Dead] [6653] piano, had gone away quietly in couples after a few minutes. The
[The Dead] [6663] which Aunt Julia had worked in red, blue and brown wools when
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6665] kind of work had been taught for one year. His mother had worked
[The Dead] [6668] mulberry buttons. It was strange that his mother had had no
[The Dead] [6670] of the Morkan family. Both she and Julia had always seemed a
[The Dead] [6674] man-o-war suit, lay at her feet. It was she who had chosen the
[The Dead] [6677] Balbrigan and, thanks to her, Gabriel himself had taken his degree
[The Dead] [6680] phrases she had used still rankled in his memory; she had once
[The Dead] [6682] Gretta at all. It was Gretta who had nursed her during all her last
[The Dead] [6692] the four young men in the doorway who had gone away to the
[The Dead] [6693] refreshment-room at the beginning of the piece but had come back
[The Dead] [6694] when the piano had stopped.
[The Dead] [6702] When they had taken their places she said abruptly:
[The Dead] [6738] careers had been parallel, first at the University and then as
[The Dead] [6743] When their turn to cross had come he was still perplexed and
[The Dead] [6750] question and Gabriel felt more at ease. A friend of hers had shown
[The Dead] [6751] her his review of Browning's poems. That was how she had found
[The Dead] [6791] Their neighbours had turned to listen to the cross- examination.
[The Dead] [6805] Gabriel did not answer for his retort had heated him.
[The Dead] [6809] They had to go visiting together and, as he had not answered her,
[The Dead] [6815] great energy. He avoided her eyes for he had seen a sour
[The Dead] [6826] stout feeble old woman with white hair. Her voice had a catch in it
[The Dead] [6827] like her son's and she stuttered slightly. She had been told that
[The Dead] [6828] Freddy had come and that he was nearly all right. Gabriel asked
[The Dead] [6829] her whether she had had a good crossing. She lived with her
[The Dead] [6831] year. She answered placidly that she had had a beautiful crossing
[The Dead] [6832] and that the captain had been most attentive to her. She spoke also
[The Dead] [6834] friends they had there. While her tongue rambled on Gabriel tried
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6839] call him a West Briton before people, even in joke. She had tried
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6890] the embrasure of the window. The room had already cleared and
[The Dead] [6903] He repeated to himself a phrase he had written in his review: "One
[The Dead] [6905] Ivors had praised the review. Was she sincere? Had she really any
[The Dead] [6906] life of her own behind all her propagandism? There had never
[The Dead] [6913] now on the wane among us may have had its faults but for my part
[The Dead] [6914] I think it had certain qualities of hospitality, of humour, of
[The Dead] [6936] music-stand the old leather-bound songbook that had her initials
[The Dead] [6937] on the cover. Freddy Malins, who had listened with his head
[The Dead] [6939] everyone else had ceased and talking animatedly to his mother
[The Dead] [6998] She had worked herself into a passion and would have continued
[The Dead] [7000] Jane, seeing that all the dancers had come back, intervened
[The Dead] [7021] "So that we had better go to supper," said Mary Jane, "and finish
[The Dead] [7026] Miss Ivors, who had put on her hat and was buttoning her cloak,
[The Dead] [7027] would not stay. She did not feel in the least hungry and she had
[The Dead] [7066] departure. But she did not seem to be in ill humour: she had gone
[The Dead] [7119] Jane's idea and she had also suggested apple sauce for the goose
[The Dead] [7120] but Aunt Kate had said that plain roast goose without any apple
[The Dead] [7121] sauce had always been good enough for her and she hoped she
[The Dead] [7128] Gabriel began to carve second helpings as soon as he had finished
[The Dead] [7131] had found the carving hot work. Mary Jane settled down quietly to
[The Dead] [7140] When everyone had been well served Gabriel said, smiling:
[The Dead] [7146] came forward with three potatoes which she had reserved for him.
[The Dead] [7157] of the company but Miss Furlong thought she had a rather vulgar
[The Dead] [7160] had one of the finest tenor voices he had ever heard.
[The Dead] [7177] to the legitimate opera. One of her pupils had given her a pass for
[The Dead] [7185] of how one night an Italian tenor had sung five encores to Let me
[The Dead] [7208] "For me," said Aunt Kate, who had been picking a bone, "there
[The Dead] [7215] was in his prime and I think he had then the purest tenor voice that
[The Dead] [7240] had been left for him. Freddy Malins also took a stalk of celery and
[The Dead] [7241] ate it with his pudding. He had been told that celery was a capital
[The Dead] [7243] Malins, who had been silent all through the supper, said that her
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7279] As the subject had grown lugubrious it was buried in a silence of
[The Dead] [7328] perhaps, I had better say, the victims--of the hospitality of certain
[The Dead] [7351] Gabriel's mind that Miss Ivors was not there and that she had gone
[The Dead] [7395] Gabriel had said.
[The Dead] [7418] Aunt Julia's face and the tears which had risen to Aunt Kate's eyes,
[The Dead] [7532] "O, now, Gabriel," said Aunt Kate, laughing, "he had a starch
[The Dead] [7535] "Well, glue or starch," said Gabriel, "the old gentleman had a horse
[The Dead] [7593] Browne, each of whom had his head out through a window of the
[The Dead] [7621] Gabriel had not gone to the door with the others. He was in a dark
[The Dead] [7680] Mrs. Conroy, too, and he told us he had a dreadful cold and
[The Dead] [7698] "They say," said Mary Jane, "we haven't had snow like it for thirty
[The Dead] [7716] hair, which he had seen her drying at the fire a few days before.
[The Dead] [7770] skirt up from the slush. She had no longer any grace of attitude,
[The Dead] [7802] ecstasy. For the years, he felt, had not quenched his soul or hers.
[The Dead] [7803] Their children, his writing, her household cares had not quenched
[The Dead] [7804] all their souls' tender fire. In one letter that he had written to her
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7809] Like distant music these words that he had written years before
[The Dead] [7811] her. When the others had gone away, when he and she were in the
[The Dead] [7853] She leaned lightly on his arm, as lightly as when she had danced
[The Dead] [7854] with him a few hours before. He had felt proud and happy then,
[The Dead] [7860] they had escaped from their lives and duties, escaped from home
[The Dead] [7900] light. She had taken off her hat and cloak and was standing before
[The Dead] [7963] washing had made it fine and brilliant. His heart was brimming
[The Dead] [7964] over with happiness. Just when he was wishing for it she had come
[The Dead] [7965] to him of her own accord. Perhaps her thoughts had been running
[The Dead] [7966] with his. Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in
[The Dead] [7967] him, and then the yielding mood had come upon her. Now that she
[The Dead] [7968] had fallen to him so easily, he wondered why he had been so
[The Dead] [7999] back of her hand like a child. A kinder note than he had intended
[The Dead] [8026] he had: big, dark eyes! And such an expression in them--an
[The Dead] [8060] While he had been full of memories of their secret life together,
[The Dead] [8061] full of tenderness and joy and desire, she had been comparing him
[The Dead] [8066] clownish lusts, the pitiable fatuous fellow he had caught a glimpse
[The Dead] [8079] would be to try to lead her whither he had purposed, caressed one
[The Dead] [8087] when he had hoped to triumph, some impalpable and vindictive
[The Dead] [8093] to caress it just as he had caressed her first letter to him that spring
[The Dead] [8108] singing only for his health. He had a very good voice, poor
[The Dead] [8156] her deep-drawn breath. So she had had that romance in her life: a
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how
[The Dead] [8158] poor a part he, her husband, had played in her life. He watched her
[The Dead] [8159] while she slept, as though he and she had never lived together as
[The Dead] [8165] face for which Michael Furey had braved death.
[The Dead] [8167] Perhaps she had not told him all the story. His eyes moved to the
[The Dead] [8168] chair over which she had thrown some of her clothes. A petticoat
[The Dead] [8171] riot of emotions of an hour before. From what had it proceeded?
[The Dead] [8176] Morkan and his horse. He had caught that haggard look upon her
[The Dead] [8181] and blowing her nose and telling him how Julia had died. He
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her
[The Dead] [8192] lover's eyes when he had told her that he did not wish to live.
[The Dead] [8194] Generous tears filled Gabriel's eyes. He had never felt like that
[The Dead] [8199] had approached that region where dwell the vast hosts of the dead.
[The Dead] [8202] impalpable world: the solid world itself, which these dead had one
[The Dead] [8206] had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver
[The Dead] [8207] and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had