Dubliners by James Joyce
hear

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

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There are 30 occurrences of the word:   hear

[The Sisters] [37] "Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear."
[The Sisters] [287] wouldn't hear him in the house any more than now. Still, I know
[Eveline] [1068] dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street
[After the Race] [1324] "Hear! hear!" whenever there was a pause. There was a great
[The Boarding House] [1980] hear of it. Dublin is such a small city: everyone knows everyone
[The Boarding House] [2056] he would never hear again of his trouble, and yet a force pushed
[Counterparts] [2753] Do you hear me now?"
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2788] was not copied by evening Mr. Crosbie would hear of the matter.
[A Painful Case] [3805] could hear nothing: the night was perfectly silent. He listened
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4059] "God, yes," said Mr. Henchy. "Did you never hear that? And the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4508] "0, ay!" said Mr. Henchy. "Give us that. Did you ever hear that.
[Grace] [5778] orator. Did you ever hear him, Tom?"
[Grace] [5780] "Did I ever hear him!" said the invalid, nettled. "Rather! I heard
[The Dead] [6488] hear two persons talking in the pantry. Then he recognised Freddy
[The Dead] [6938] perched sideways to hear her better, was still applauding when
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7167] "Because," Freddy Malins explained, "now I'd be curious to hear
[The Dead] [7206] "O, I'd give anything to hear Caruso sing," said Mary Jane.
[The Dead] [7260] He was astonished to hear that the monks never spoke, got up at
[The Dead] [7302] playing a waltz tune and he could hear the skirts sweeping against
[The Dead] [7373] "Hear, hear!" said Mr. Browne loudly.
[The Dead] [7482] goodness he didn't hear me."
[The Dead] [7628] also. But he could hear little save the noise of laughter and dispute
[The Dead] [7793] But the man could not hear with the noise of the furnace. It was
[The Dead] [7817] Perhaps she would not hear at once: she would be undressing.
[The Dead] [7875] hear the falling of the molten wax into the tray and the thumping
[The Dead] [7953] He was in such a fever of rage and desire that he did not hear her