Dubliners by James Joyce
him

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 493 occurrences of the word:   him

[The Sisters] [3] THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.
[The Sisters] [23] queer... there was something uncanny about him. I'll tell you my
[The Sisters] [27] mind. Tiresome old fool! When we knew him first he used to be
[The Sisters] [29] tired of him and his endless stories about the distillery.
[The Sisters] [50] "The youngster and he were great friends. The old chap taught him
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [56] black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by
[The Sisters] [69] "That's my principle, too," said my uncle. "Let him learn to box his
[The Sisters] [121] have gone into the little dark room behind the shop to find him
[The Sisters] [124] Toast for him and this present would have roused him from his
[The Sisters] [126] black snuff-box for his hands trembled too much to allow him to
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [169] acquaintance before I knew him well.
[The Sisters] [231] the breath went out of him. He had a beautiful death, God be
[The Sisters] [236] "Father O'Rourke was in with him a Tuesday and anointed him and
[The Sisters] [237] prepared him and all."
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [254] know that you did all you could for him. You were both very kind
[The Sisters] [255] to him, I must say."
[The Sisters] [260] poor as we are--we wouldn't see him want anything while he was
[The Sisters] [268] him and then laying him out and then the coffin and then arranging
[The Sisters] [270] know what we'd done at all. It was him brought us all them flowers
[The Sisters] [275] "Wasn't that good of him?" said my aunt
[The Sisters] [284] kindness to him."
[The Sisters] [287] wouldn't hear him in the house any more than now. Still, I know
[The Sisters] [290] "It's when it's all over that you'll miss him," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [292] "I know that," said Eliza. "I won't be bringing him in his cup of
[The Sisters] [293] beef-tea any me, nor you, ma'am, sending him his snuff. Ah, poor
[The Sisters] [299] "Mind you, I noticed there was something queer coming over him
[The Sisters] [300] latterly. Whenever I'd bring in his soup to him there I'd find him
[The Sisters] [309] Nannie with him. If we could only get one of them new-fangled
[The Sisters] [310] carriages that makes no noise that Father O'Rourke told him about,
[The Sisters] [323] priesthood was too much for him. And then his life was, you might
[The Sisters] [338] nervous, God be merciful to him!"
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [348] couldn't see a sight of him anywhere. So then the clerk suggested
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[The Sisters] [364] gone wrong with him...."
[An Encounter] [435] an excuse for him and Leo Dillon was to tell his brother to say he
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [550] from the far end of the field. I watched him lazily as I chewed one
[An Encounter] [558] We followed him with our eyes and saw that when he had gone on
[An Encounter] [565] answered him and he sat down beside us on the slope slowly and
[An Encounter] [620] to him.
[An Encounter] [624] and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking
[An Encounter] [642] catching sight of the cat which had escaped him, sprang up and
[An Encounter] [656] unruly there was nothing would do him any good but a good sound
[An Encounter] [665] girls or having a girl for a sweetheart he would whip him and whip
[An Encounter] [666] him; and that would teach him not to be talking to girls. And if a
[An Encounter] [668] give him such a whipping as no boy ever got in this world. He said
[An Encounter] [674] seemed to plead with me that I should understand him.
[An Encounter] [679] obliged to go, I bade him good-day. I went up the slope calmly but
[An Encounter] [682] without looking at him, called loudly across the field:
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [728] the corner we hid in the shadow until we had seen him safely
[Araby] [852] him talking to himself and heard the hallstand rocking when it had
[Araby] [854] When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me
[Araby] [859] I did not smile. My aunt said to him energetically:
[Araby] [861] "Can't you give him the money and let him go? You've kept him
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Eveline] [1025] kind, manly, open-hearted. She was to go away with him by the
[Eveline] [1026] night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres
[Eveline] [1028] the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the
[Eveline] [1035] theatre with him. He was awfully fond of music and sang a little.
[Eveline] [1040] him. He had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck boy
[Eveline] [1048] to him.
[Eveline] [1108] A bell clanged upon her heart. She felt him seize her hand:
[Eveline] [1125] to him, passive, like a helpless animal. Her eyes gave him no sign
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[After the Race] [1176] excess, had paid his bills and brought him home. It was at
[After the Race] [1191] not altogether pleasant for him, as he had nearly always to make a
[After the Race] [1200] had presented him to one of the French competitors and, in answer
[After the Race] [1213] his substance! It was a serious thing for him.
[After the Race] [1235] friend, who was staying with him, were to go home to dress. The
[After the Race] [1274] him: he aroused the torpid Routh at last. The room grew doubly
[After the Race] [1326] speech. Farley clapped him on the back and laughed loudly. What
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[Two Gallants] [1405] against him. He had a brave manner of coming up to a party of
[Two Gallants] [1449] another. He always stared straight before him as if he were on
[Two Gallants] [1451] was necessary for him to move his body from the hips. At present
[Two Gallants] [1453] always ready to give him the hard word. He was often to be seen
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1648] towards him and, when they turned to the right, he followed them,
[Two Gallants] [1658] forsake him and, as he came by the railings of the Duke's Lawn, he
[Two Gallants] [1667] that was meant to charm him and did not answer the glances which
[Two Gallants] [1668] invited him to be bold. He knew that he would have to speak a
[Two Gallants] [1671] hours till he met Corley again troubled him a little. He could think
[Two Gallants] [1685] grudging curates to bring him, he had eaten nothing since
[Two Gallants] [1688] on him.
[Two Gallants] [1700] examined him point by point before resuming their conversation in
[Two Gallants] [1701] a subdued voice. The girl brought him a plate of grocer's hot peas,
[Two Gallants] [1709] him feel keenly his own poverty of purse and spirit. He was tired
[Two Gallants] [1717] heart against the world. But all hope had not left him. He felt
[Two Gallants] [1728] from all his walking. His friends asked him had he seen Corley and
[Two Gallants] [1756] Corley's slowly revolving head calmed him somewhat: he was sure
[Two Gallants] [1757] Corley would pull it off all right. All at once the idea struck him
[Two Gallants] [1759] him the slip. His eyes searched the street: there was no sign of
[Two Gallants] [1767] Suddenly he saw them coming towards him. He started with
[Two Gallants] [1772] pricked him like the point of a sharp instrument. He knew Corley
[Two Gallants] [1791] made him pant. He called out:
[Two Gallants] [1795] Corley turned his head to see who had called him, and then
[Two Gallants] [1796] continued walking as before. Lenehan ran after him, settling the
[Two Gallants] [1814] Corley halted at the first lamp and stared grimly before him. Then
[The Boarding House] [1826] headlong into debt. It was no use making him take the pledge: he
[The Boarding House] [1833] separation from him with care of the children. She would give him
[The Boarding House] [1933] outraged mother. She had allowed him to live beneath her roof,
[The Boarding House] [1951] room to say that she wished to speak with him. She felt sure she
[The Boarding House] [1959] him, perhaps, the loss of his job. Whereas if he agreed all might be
[The Boarding House] [1974] night before was a cause of acute pain to him; the priest had drawn
[The Boarding House] [2000] she had done. Of course he had done it too. His instinct urged him
[The Boarding House] [2005] trousers she tapped lightly at his door and entered. She told him
[The Boarding House] [2007] her mother would speak with him that morning. She cried and
[The Boarding House] [2021] him. Then late one night as he was undressing for she had tapped
[The Boarding House] [2031] him alone, at night, in the sleeping house. And her thoughtfulness!
[The Boarding House] [2033] a little tumbler of punch ready for him. Perhaps they could be
[The Boarding House] [2042] "What am I to do?" The instinct of the celibate warned him to hold
[The Boarding House] [2043] back. But the sin was there; even his sense of honour told him that
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[The Boarding House] [2057] him downstairs step by step. The implacable faces of his employer
[The Boarding House] [2063] staircase he glanced up and saw Jack regarding him from the door
[The Boarding House] [2069] violence. Everyone tried to quiet him. The music-hall artiste, a
[The Boarding House] [2071] harm meant: but Jack kept shouting at him that if any fellow tried
[A Little Cloud] [2106] and wished him godspeed. Gallaher had got on. You could tell that
[A Little Cloud] [2135] life) he became sad. A gentle melancholy took possession of him.
[A Little Cloud] [2137] the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.
[A Little Cloud] [2143] shyness had always held him back; and so the books had remained
[A Little Cloud] [2145] consoled him.
[A Little Cloud] [2157] had roystered. No memory of the past touched him, for his mind
[A Little Cloud] [2174] footsteps troubled him, the wandering, silent figures troubled him;
[A Little Cloud] [2175] and at times a sound of low fugitive laughter made him tremble
[A Little Cloud] [2186] flight. But nobody denied him talent. There was always a certain...
[A Little Cloud] [2197] admire him for it.
[A Little Cloud] [2205] pitied the poor stunted houses. They seemed to him a band of
[A Little Cloud] [2211] into some London paper for him. Could he write something
[A Little Cloud] [2213] thought that a poetic moment had touched him took life within
[A Little Cloud] [2214] him like an infant hope. He stepped onward bravely.
[A Little Cloud] [2216] Every step brought him nearer to London, farther from his own
[A Little Cloud] [2221] verse. He felt them within him. He tried weigh his soul to see if it
[A Little Cloud] [2228] English critics, perhaps, would recognise him as one of the Celtic
[A Little Cloud] [2241] to overmaster him and he halted before the door in indecision.
[A Little Cloud] [2244] The light and noise of the bar held him at the doorways for a few
[A Little Cloud] [2245] moments. He looked about him, but his sight was confused by the
[A Little Cloud] [2246] shining of many red and green wine-glasses The bar seemed to him
[A Little Cloud] [2247] to be full of people and he felt that the people were observing him
[A Little Cloud] [2250] he saw that nobody had turned to look at him: and there, sure
[A Little Cloud] [2302] "I met him one night in London and he seemed to be very flush....
[A Little Cloud] [2349] him. There was something vulgar in his friend which he had not
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2411] him), but of others he had had personal experience. He spared
[A Little Cloud] [2504] made him blush at any time: and now he felt warm and excited.
[A Little Cloud] [2512] life and his friend's and it seemed to him unjust. Gallaher was his
[A Little Cloud] [2519] Gallaher was only patronising him by his friendliness just as he
[A Little Cloud] [2550] watched him for a few moments and then said:
[A Little Cloud] [2567] loudly. Then he looked thoughtfully before him and said in a
[A Little Cloud] [2584] him short answers. She said she would do without any tea but
[A Little Cloud] [2590] "Here. Don't waken him."
[A Little Cloud] [2597] It had cost him ten and elevenpence; but what an agony of
[A Little Cloud] [2598] nervousness it had cost him! How he had suffered that day, waiting
[A Little Cloud] [2601] before him, paying at the desk and forgetting to take up the odd
[A Little Cloud] [2605] home Annie kissed him and said it was very pretty and stylish; but
[A Little Cloud] [2610] kissed him and said he was very good to think of her.
[A Little Cloud] [2618] him. They repelled him and defied him: there was no passion in
[A Little Cloud] [2628] dull resentment against his life awoke within him. Could he not
[A Little Cloud] [2629] escape from his little house? Was it too late for him to try to live
[A Little Cloud] [2632] it published, that might open the way for him.
[A Little Cloud] [2634] A volume of Byron's poems lay before him on the table. He opened
[A Little Cloud] [2646] He paused. He felt the rhythm of the verse about him in the room.
[A Little Cloud] [2687] She flung her parcels on the floor and snatched the child from him.
[A Little Cloud] [2689] "What have you done to him?" she cried, glaring into his face.
[A Little Cloud] [2698] Giving no heed to him she began to walk up and down the room,
[Counterparts] [2722] The man muttered "Blast him!" under his breath and pushed back
[Counterparts] [2772] might give him an order on the cashier. He stood still, gazing
[Counterparts] [2787] the room, he heard Mr. Alleyne cry after him that if the contract
[Counterparts] [2798] looked at him inquiringly.
[Counterparts] [2815] The curate brought him a glass of plain porter. The man drank it at
[Counterparts] [2833] counter as if to intimate that their presence prevented him from
[Counterparts] [2862] correspondence and then flicked it towards him as if to say: "That's
[Counterparts] [2883] All the indignities of his life enraged him.... Could he ask the
[Counterparts] [2889] His imagination had so abstracted him that his name was called
[Counterparts] [2897] descending upon the head of the manikin before him:
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2932] say a word to him when he was with the chief clerk. The man felt
[Counterparts] [2935] what a hornet's nest the office would be for him. He could
[Counterparts] [2939] with everyone else. Mr. Alleyne would never give him an hour's
[Counterparts] [2940] rest; his life would be a hell to him. He had made a proper fool of
[Counterparts] [2943] ever since the day Mr. Alleyne had overheard him mimicking his
[Counterparts] [2950] public-house. The fog had begun to chill him and he wondered
[Counterparts] [2951] could he touch Pat in O'Neill's. He could not touch him for more
[Counterparts] [2963] the six shillings was allowed him literally. He came out of the
[Counterparts] [2975] "So, I just looked at him--coolly, you know, and looked at her.
[Counterparts] [2976] Then I looked back at him again--taking my time, you know. 'I
[Counterparts] [2993] asked him to give his version of it, and he did so with great
[Counterparts] [3046] The oblique staring expression in them fascinated him. She
[Counterparts] [3047] glanced at him once or twice and, when the party was leaving the
[Counterparts] [3050] would look back at him, but he was disappointed. He cursed his
[Counterparts] [3056] When Paddy Leonard called him he found that they were talking
[Counterparts] [3101] waiting for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was
[Counterparts] [3110] the woman in the big hat who had brushed against him and said
[Counterparts] [3111] Pardon! his fury nearly choked him.
[Counterparts] [3113] His tram let him down at Shelbourne Road and he steered his great
[Counterparts] [3122] when he was sober and was bullied by him when he was drunk.
[Counterparts] [3165] but the man followed him and caught him by the coat. The little
[Counterparts] [3166] boy looked about him wildly but, seeing no way of escape, fell
[Counterparts] [3170] him vigorously with the stick. "Take that, you little whelp!"
[Clay] [3222] laundry. Joe was a good fellow. She had nursed him and Alphy
[Clay] [3314] while they were young. Maria agreed with him and favoured him
[Clay] [3316] she was getting out at the Canal Bridge she thanked him and
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3354] long as you didn't rub him the wrong way. Mrs. Donnelly played
[Clay] [3365] So Maria let him have his way and they sat by the fire talking over
[Clay] [3367] Alphy. But Joe cried that God might strike him stone dead if ever
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3430] like the long ago and no music for him like poor old Balfe,
[Clay] [3433] end he had to ask his wife to tell him where the corkscrew was.
[A Painful Case] [3467] disorder. A medival doctor would have called him saturnine. His
[A Painful Case] [3477] autobiographical habit which led him to compose in his mind from
[A Painful Case] [3491] brought him sometimes to an opera or a concert: these were the
[A Painful Case] [3505] prophecy of failure. The lady who sat next him looked round at the
[A Painful Case] [3539] stealthily, he forced her to ask him to her house. Captain Sinico
[A Painful Case] [3552] own life. With almost maternal solicitude she urged him to let his
[A Painful Case] [3566] She asked him why did he not write out his thoughts. For what, he
[A Painful Case] [3578] united them. This union exalted him, wore away the rough edges
[A Painful Case] [3583] closely to him, he heard the strange impersonal voice which he
[A Painful Case] [3591] words disillusioned him. He did not visit her for a week, then he
[A Painful Case] [3592] wrote to her asking her to meet him. As he did not wish their last
[A Painful Case] [3626] down before him between his elbows and read the paragraph over
[A Painful Case] [3628] on his plate. The girl came over to him to ask was his dinner not
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[A Painful Case] [3729] herself; she had degraded him. He saw the squalid tract of her vice,
[A Painful Case] [3744] quickly and went out. The cold air met him on the threshold; it
[A Painful Case] [3749] The proprietor served him obsequiously but did not venture to talk.
[A Painful Case] [3767] her openly. He had done what seemed to him best. How was he to
[A Painful Case] [3771] a memory--if anyone remembered him.
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[A Painful Case] [3786] some human figures lying. Those venal and furtive loves filled him
[A Painful Case] [3789] love him and he had denied her life and happiness: he had
[A Painful Case] [3791] prostrate creatures down by the wall were watching him and
[A Painful Case] [3792] wished him gone. No one wanted him; he was outcast from life's
[A Painful Case] [3802] memory told him. He halted under a tree and allowed the rhythm
[A Painful Case] [3803] to die away. He could not feel her near him in the darkness nor her
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3863] lapel of his coat. The old man watched him attentively and then,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3869] the Christian Brothers and I done what I could him, and there he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3870] goes boosing about. I tried to make him someway decent."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3874] "Only I'm an old man now I'd change his tune for him. I'd take the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3875] stick to his back and beat him while I could stand over him--as I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3876] done many a time before. The mother, you know, she cocks him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3890] "Why don't you put him to something?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3982] not. I know him. Is it Tricky Dicky Tierney?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4007] "Sit down here, Mr. Henchy," said the old man, offering him his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4031] "He asked me who the nominators were; and I told him. I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4069] expect us to work for him if he won't stump up?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4110] him?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4113] the old man. "Let him work for his own side and not come spying
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4175] candlesticks, went to the door to light him downstairs.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4222] he send up a dozen of stout. I asked him again now, but he was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4226] "Why didn't you remind him?" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4262] me? Now, I declare to God I didn't believe him."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4295] ask him to lend us a corkscrew--for Mr. Henchy, say. Tell him we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4312] loan of him. He means well, you know, in his own tinpot way."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4349] "Yes. I got him one or two sure things in Dawson Street, Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4398] reason was that he considered his companions beneath him. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4469] stir up any bad blood. We all respect him now that he's dead and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4476] "Our side of the house respects him, because he was a gentleman."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4490] The old man handed him another bottle and he placed it on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4502] renege him. By God, I'll say for you, Joe! No, by God, you stuck to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4503] him like a man!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4554] Sundered him from the thing he loved.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4557] Betrayed him to the rabble-rout
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4565] And death has now united him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4569] Or high ambition spurs him now
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4571] They had their way: they laid him low.
[A Mother] [4604] him Hoppy Holohan. He walked up and down constantly, stood by
[A Mother] [4629] him. At some party in a strange house when she lifted her eyebrow
[A Mother] [4631] troubled him, she put the eider-down quilt over his feet and made a
[A Mother] [4662] in the Antient Concert Rooms. She brought him into the
[A Mother] [4663] drawing-room, made him sit down and brought out the decanter
[A Mother] [4671] Kearney helped him. She had tact. She knew what artistes should
[A Mother] [4678] She pushed the decanter towards him, saying:
[A Mother] [4728] asked him to tell her what it meant. Mr. Holohan did not know
[A Mother] [4758] out Mr. Holohan. She buttonholed him as he was limping out
[A Mother] [4759] quickly with a glass of lemonade for a young lady and asked him
[A Mother] [4767] She called Mr. Fitzpatrick away from his screen and told him that
[A Mother] [4841] people know what an ordeal a concert was to him. Therefore when
[A Mother] [4842] he saw Mr. Duggan he went over to him and asked:
[A Mother] [4867] dressing-room at that moment and the two young ladies asked him
[A Mother] [4882] herself and went out after him.
[A Mother] [4887] asked him when was her daughter going to be paid. Mr. Holohan
[A Mother] [4911] were to leave the report for him at the Freeman office and he
[A Mother] [4914] in his hand and the aroma of cigar smoke floated near him. He had
[A Mother] [4916] him considerably but he remained leaning against the mantelpiece.
[A Mother] [4917] Miss Healy stood in front of him, talking and laughing. He was old
[A Mother] [4922] beneath him rose and fell at that moment for him, that the laughter
[A Mother] [4950] something was wrong. Mr. Kearney looked straight before him,
[A Mother] [5098] daughter and followed him. As she passed through the doorway
[Grace] [5117] lift him up: but he was quite helpless. He lay curled up at the foot
[Grace] [5119] him over. His hat had rolled a few yards away and his clothes were
[Grace] [5125] These two gentlemen and one of the curates carried him up the
[Grace] [5126] stairs and laid him down again on the floor of the bar. In two
[Grace] [5128] bar asked everyone who he was and who was with him. No one
[Grace] [5134] "No, sir. There was two gentlemen with him."
[Grace] [5140] "Give him air. He's fainted."
[Grace] [5149] who had carried him upstairs held a dinged silk hat in his hand.
[Grace] [5153] followed him down the laneway collected outside the door,
[Grace] [5173] opened his eyes and looked about him. He looked at the circle of
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5201] The new-comer surveyed the deplorable figure before him and
[Grace] [5204] "It's all right, constable. I'll see him home."
[Grace] [5241] The shock and the incipient pain had partly sobered him.
[Grace] [5255] huddled together with cold. His friend asked him to tell how the
[Grace] [5282] mimicry. Modern business methods had spared him only so far as
[Grace] [5283] to allow him a little office in Crowe Street, on the window blind of
[Grace] [5296] known him at his highest point of success still esteemed him as a
[Grace] [5301] Kernan was helped into the house. His wife put him to bed while
[Grace] [5305] their mother's absence, began some horseplay with him. He was
[Grace] [5321] long as he has money in his pocket to keep him out from his wife
[Grace] [5333] "We were waiting for him to come home with the money. He
[Grace] [5336] "O, now, Mrs. Kernan," said Mr. Power, "we'll make him turn over
[Grace] [5340] She saw him to the door. The carman was stamping up and down
[Grace] [5343] "It's very kind of you to bring him home," she said.
[Grace] [5349] "We'll make a new man of him," he said. "Good-night, Mrs.
[Grace] [5363] with her husband by waltzing with him to Mr. Power's
[Grace] [5382] She made beef-tea for him and scolded him roundly. She accepted
[Grace] [5383] his frequent intemperance as part of the climate, healed him
[Grace] [5384] dutifully whenever he was sick and always tried to make him eat a
[Grace] [5390] Two nights after, his friends came to see him. She brought them up
[Grace] [5393] occasional stinging pain of which had made him somewhat
[Grace] [5411] happy. People had great sympathy with him, for it was known that
[Grace] [5414] had pawned the furniture on him.
[Grace] [5463] Coroner. His new office made him professionally interested in Mr.
[Grace] [5516] smarted in person or by proxy under his exactions, spoke of him
[Grace] [5534] "Only for him----"
[Grace] [5536] "O, only for him," said Mr. Power, "it might have been a case of
[Grace] [5560] mutually honourable and resented any affront put upon him by
[Grace] [5588] before him on the table and a bloody big spoon like a shovel. He
[Grace] [5688] A thought seemed to strike him. He turned suddenly to the invalid
[Grace] [5761] "O, you must know him, Tom," said Mr. Cunningham stoutly.
[Grace] [5764] "Ah,... yes. I think I know him. Rather red face; tall."
[Grace] [5778] orator. Did you ever hear him, Tom?"
[Grace] [5780] "Did I ever hear him!" said the invalid, nettled. "Rather! I heard
[Grace] [5781] him...."
[Grace] [5793] "I heard him once," Mr. Kernan continued. "I forget the subject of
[Grace] [5802] hadn't he a voice! The Prisoner of the Vatican, he called him. I
[Grace] [5845] financial condition had constrained him to tie himself to
[Grace] [5848] ingratiate him with the housewives of the district. He bore himself
[Grace] [5852] Mr. Fogarty brought a gift with him, a half-pint of special whisky.
[Grace] [5856] a small account for groceries unsettled between him and Mr.
[Grace] [6033] crabbed-looking old chap, looking at him from under his bushy
[Grace] [6066] I'll just tell him my little tale of woe. I'm not such a bad fellow----"
[Grace] [6128] behind him sat Mr. Power and Mr. Fogarty. Mr. M'Coy had tried
[Grace] [6176] Jesus Christ. But, he told his hearers, the text had seemed to him
[The Dead] [6218] the office on the ground floor and helped him off with his overcoat
[The Dead] [6260] worlds that any of Mary Jane's pupils should see him under the
[The Dead] [6262] manage him. Freddy Malins always came late, but they wondered
[The Dead] [6268] for him, "Miss Kate and Miss Julia thought you were never
[The Dead] [6296] She had preceded him into the pantry to help him off with his
[The Dead] [6318] The girl glanced back at him over her shoulder and said with great
[The Dead] [6346] "O no, sir!" cried the girl, following him. "Really, sir, I wouldn't
[The Dead] [6352] The girl, seeing that he had gained the stairs, called out after him:
[The Dead] [6359] sudden retort. It had cast a gloom over him which he tried to dispel
[The Dead] [6367] reminded him that their grade of culture differed from his. He
[The Dead] [6410] "Don't mind him, Aunt Kate," she said. "He's really an awful
[The Dead] [6412] him do the dumb-bells, and forcing Eva to eat the stirabout. The
[The Dead] [6484] don't let him up if he's screwed. I'm sure he's screwed. I'm sure he
[The Dead] [6524] of whisky. The young men eyed him respectfully while he took a
[The Dead] [6576] get him to sing later on. All Dublin is raving about him."
[The Dead] [6591] "It's only Freddy, Kate, and Gabriel with him."
[The Dead] [6600] scanty hair made him look sleepy. He was laughing heartily in a
[The Dead] [6609] voice and then, seeing that Mr. Browne was grinning at him from
[The Dead] [6621] made him take the pledge on New Year's Eve. But come on,
[The Dead] [6635] him a full glass of lemonade. Freddy Malins' left hand accepted the
[The Dead] [6644] well as his fit of laughter would allow him.
[The Dead] [6649] no melody for him and he doubted whether it had any melody for
[The Dead] [6666] for him as a birthday present a waistcoat of purple tabinet, with
[The Dead] [6712] "Who is G. C.?" answered Miss Ivors, turning her eyes upon him.
[The Dead] [6728] for which he was paid fifteen shillings. But that did not make him
[The Dead] [6805] Gabriel did not answer for his retort had heated him.
[The Dead] [6817] was surprised to feel his hand firmly pressed. She looked at him
[The Dead] [6839] call him a West Briton before people, even in joke. She had tried
[The Dead] [6840] to make him ridiculous before people, heckling him and staring at
[The Dead] [6841] him with her rabbit's eyes.
[The Dead] [6843] He saw his wife making her way towards him through the waltzing
[The Dead] [6844] couples. When she reached him she said into his ear:
[The Dead] [6873] She looked at him for a moment, then turned to Mrs. Malins and
[The Dead] [6889] visit his mother Gabriel left the chair free for him and retired into
[The Dead] [6907] been any ill-feeling between them until that night. It unnerved him
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6910] not be sorry to see him fail in his speech. An idea came into his
[The Dead] [6911] mind and gave him courage. He would say, alluding to Aunt Kate
[The Dead] [6943] both his hands, shaking it when words failed him or the catch in
[The Dead] [6944] his voice proved too much for him.
[The Dead] [6955] near him in the manner of a showman introducing a prodigy to an
[The Dead] [6961] turned to him and said:
[The Dead] [7143] stuffing let him or her speak."
[The Dead] [7145] A chorus of voices invited him to begin his own supper and Lily
[The Dead] [7146] came forward with three potatoes which she had reserved for him.
[The Dead] [7162] "Have you heard him?" he asked Mr. Bartell D'Arcy across the
[The Dead] [7168] your opinion of him. I think he has a grand voice."
[The Dead] [7210] you ever heard of him."
[The Dead] [7214] "His name," said Aunt Kate, "was Parkinson. I heard him when he
[The Dead] [7218] "Strange," said Mr. Bartell D'Arcy. "I never even heard of him."
[The Dead] [7240] had been left for him. Freddy Malins also took a stalk of celery and
[The Dead] [7269] still seemed not to understand. Freddy Malins explained to him, as
[The Dead] [7289] nudged him and whispered something to him upon which he
[The Dead] [7481] "But tell him to come in, Mary Jane, and close the door. I hope to
[The Dead] [7587] the seat, Mr. Browne helping him with advice. At last she was
[The Dead] [7661] wouldn't sing all the night. O, I'll get him to sing a song before he
[The Dead] [7679] "I have been at him all the evening," said Miss O'Callaghan, "and
[The Dead] [7712] him advice and said it was a great pity and urged him to be very
[The Dead] [7735] won't have him annoyed."
[The Dead] [7768] She was walking on before him with Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, her shoes
[The Dead] [7775] She was walking on before him so lightly and so erect that he
[The Dead] [7778] him so frail that he longed to defend her against something and
[The Dead] [7810] were borne towards him from the past. He longed to be alone with
[The Dead] [7819] look at him....
[The Dead] [7822] its rattling noise as it saved him from conversation. She was
[The Dead] [7854] with him a few hours before. He had felt proud and happy then,
[The Dead] [7857] of her body, musical and strange and perfumed, sent through him a
[The Dead] [7866] followed him in silence, their feet falling in soft thuds on the
[The Dead] [7874] halted, too, on the steps below him. In the silence Gabriel could
[The Dead] [7885] muttered apology, but Gabriel cut him short.
[The Dead] [7907] shaft of light towards him. Her face looked so serious and weary
[The Dead] [7921] conquer him, he said abruptly:
[The Dead] [7929] "Yes. What about him?"
[The Dead] [7933] him, and I didn't expect it, really. It's a pity he wouldn't keep away
[The Dead] [7938] annoyed, too, about something? If she would only turn to him or
[The Dead] [7939] come to him of her own accord! To take her as she was would be
[The Dead] [7943] "When did you lend him the pound?" she asked, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7954] come from the window. She stood before him for an instant,
[The Dead] [7955] looking at him strangely. Then, suddenly raising herself on tiptoe
[The Dead] [7956] and resting her hands lightly on his shoulders, she kissed him.
[The Dead] [7965] to him of her own accord. Perhaps her thoughts had been running
[The Dead] [7967] him, and then the yielding mood had come upon her. Now that she
[The Dead] [7968] had fallen to him so easily, he wondered why he had been so
[The Dead] [7972] arm swiftly about her body and drawing her towards him, he said
[The Dead] [7987] She broke loose from him and ran to the bed and, throwing her
[The Dead] [7992] always puzzled him when he saw it in a mirror, and his
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8029] "O, then, you are in love with him?" said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [8031] "I used to go out walking with him," she said, "when I was in
[The Dead] [8039] She looked at him and asked in surprise:
[The Dead] [8046] "How do I know? To see him, perhaps."
[The Dead] [8048] She looked away from him along the shaft of light towards the
[The Dead] [8061] full of tenderness and joy and desire, she had been comparing him
[The Dead] [8063] person assailed him. He saw himself as a ludicrous figure, acting
[The Dead] [8076] "I was great with him at that time," she said.
[The Dead] [8088] being was coming against him, gathering forces against him in its
[The Dead] [8091] again, for he felt that she would tell him of herself. Her hand was
[The Dead] [8093] to caress it just as he had caressed her first letter to him that spring
[The Dead] [8115] see him so I wrote him a letter saying I was going up to Dublin and
[The Dead] [8128] "And did you not tell him to go back?" asked Gabriel.
[The Dead] [8130] "I implored of him to go home at once and told him he would get
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how
[The Dead] [8167] Perhaps she had not told him all the story. His eyes moved to the
[The Dead] [8180] drawn down and Aunt Kate would be sitting beside him, crying
[The Dead] [8181] and blowing her nose and telling him how Julia had died. He
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her
[The Dead] [8205] A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It
[The Dead] [8208] come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the