Dubliners by James Joyce
in

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 1055 occurrences of the word:   in

[The Sisters] [6] found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was
[The Sisters] [12] myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my
[The Sisters] [13] ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in
[The Sisters] [26] He began to puff at his pipe, no doubt arranging his opinion in his
[The Sisters] [92] from his unfinished sentences. In the dark of my room I imagined
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [105] house in Great Britain Street. It was an unassuming shop,
[The Sisters] [108] ordinary days a notice used to hang in the window, saying:
[The Sisters] [122] sitting in his arm-chair by the fire, nearly smothered in his
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [138] reading all the theatrical advertisements in the shop-windows as I
[The Sisters] [139] went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a
[The Sisters] [140] mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a
[The Sisters] [143] before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish
[The Sisters] [144] college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin
[The Sisters] [149] difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain
[The Sisters] [156] found in himself the courage to undertake them; and I was not
[The Sisters] [159] printed as the law notices in the newspaper, elucidating all these
[The Sisters] [168] which had made me feel uneasy in the beginning of our
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[The Sisters] [172] tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream. I
[The Sisters] [174] lamp of antique fashion. I felt that I had been very far away, in
[The Sisters] [175] some land where the customs were strange--in Persia, I thought....
[The Sisters] [178] In the evening my aunt took me with her to visit the house of
[The Sisters] [181] clouds. Nannie received us in the hall; and, as it would have been
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [191] I went in on tiptoe. The room through the lace end of the blind was
[The Sisters] [199] priest was smiling as he lay there in his coffin.
[The Sisters] [206] in the room--the flowers.
[The Sisters] [208] We crossed ourselves and came away. In the little room downstairs
[The Sisters] [209] we found Eliza seated in his arm-chair in state. I groped my way
[The Sisters] [210] towards my usual chair in the corner while Nannie went to the
[The Sisters] [225] Eliza sighed again and bowed her head in assent. My aunt fingered
[The Sisters] [236] "Father O'Rourke was in with him a Tuesday and anointed him and
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [261] in it."
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [269] about the Mass in the chapel. Only for Father O'Rourke I don't
[The Sisters] [287] wouldn't hear him in the house any more than now. Still, I know
[The Sisters] [292] "I know that," said Eliza. "I won't be bringing him in his cup of
[The Sisters] [300] latterly. Whenever I'd bring in his soup to him there I'd find him
[The Sisters] [301] with his breviary fallen to the floor, lying back in the chair and his
[The Sisters] [308] again where we were all born down in Irishtown and take me and
[The Sisters] [319] she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate
[The Sisters] [331] quietly to my chair in the comer. Eliza seemed to have fallen into a
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[The Sisters] [352] think but there he was, sitting up by himself in the dark in his
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[An Encounter] [370] and The Halfpenny Marvel . Every evening after school we met in
[An Encounter] [376] went to eight- o'clock mass every morning in Gardiner Street and
[An Encounter] [377] the peaceful odour of Mrs. Dillon was prevalent in the hall of the
[An Encounter] [390] banded ourselves together, some boldly, some in jest and some
[An Encounter] [391] almost in fear: and of the number of these latter, the reluctant
[An Encounter] [392] Indians who were afraid to seem studious or lacking in robustness,
[An Encounter] [393] I was one. The adventures related in the literature of the Wild
[An Encounter] [397] girls. Though there was nothing wrong in these stories and though
[An Encounter] [405] you studied it? What have you there in your pocket?"
[An Encounter] [413] any more of this wretched stuff in this college. The man who wrote
[An Encounter] [426] in the morning because I wanted real adventures to happen to
[An Encounter] [433] miching. Each of us saved up sixpence. We were to meet at ten in
[An Encounter] [437] to the ships, then to cross in the ferryboat and walk out to see the
[An Encounter] [449] That night I slept badly. In the morning I was firstcomer to the
[An Encounter] [450] bridge as I lived nearest. I hid my books in the long grass near the
[An Encounter] [452] hurried along the canal bank. It was a mild sunny morning in the
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [460] to an air in my head. I was very happy.
[An Encounter] [466] explained some improvements which he had made in it. I asked
[An Encounter] [489] the silver badge of a cricket club in his cap. When we came to the
[An Encounter] [512] We crossed the Liffey in the ferryboat, paying our toll to be
[An Encounter] [513] transported in the company of two labourers and a little Jew with a
[An Encounter] [529] Ringsend. The day had grown sultry, and in the windows of the
[An Encounter] [544] before he regained any cheerfulness. The sun went in behind some
[An Encounter] [548] There was nobody but ourselves in the field. When we had lain on
[An Encounter] [552] by the bank slowly. He walked with one hand upon his hip and in
[An Encounter] [554] He was shabbily dressed in a suit of greenish-black and wore what
[An Encounter] [562] something in the grass.
[An Encounter] [575] book he mentioned so that in the end he said:
[An Encounter] [579] different; he goes in for games."
[An Encounter] [587] saw that he had great gaps in his mouth between his yellow teeth.
[An Encounter] [601] His attitude on this point struck me as strangely liberal in a man of
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [603] sweethearts was reasonable. But I disliked the words in his mouth
[An Encounter] [613] speech, his mind was slowly circling round and round in the same
[An Encounter] [636] "In case he asks us for our names," I said "let you be Murphy and I'll
[An Encounter] [668] give him such a whipping as no boy ever got in this world. He said
[An Encounter] [669] that there was nothing in this world he would like so well as that.
[An Encounter] [672] better than anything in this world; and his voice, as he led me
[An Encounter] [686] My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it and I was ashamed
[An Encounter] [688] Mahony saw me and hallooed in answer. How my heart beat as he
[An Encounter] [690] And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a
[Araby] [698] detached from its neighbours in a square ground The other houses
[Araby] [702] The former tenant of our house, a priest, had died in the back
[Araby] [704] in all the rooms, and the waste room behind the kitchen was
[Araby] [712] priest; in his will he had left all his money to institutions and the
[Araby] [716] eaten our dinners. When we met in the street the houses had grown
[Araby] [720] bodies glowed. Our shouts echoed in the silent street. The career
[Araby] [728] the corner we hid in the shadow until we had seen him safely
[Araby] [730] brother in to his tea we watched her from our shadow peer up and
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [739] Every morning I lay on the floor in the front parlour watching her
[Araby] [743] kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near
[Araby] [749] Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to
[Araby] [756] or a ballad about the troubles in our native land. These noises
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [759] to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I
[Araby] [768] One evening I went into the back drawing-room in which the priest
[Araby] [769] had died. It was a dark rainy evening and there was no sound in the
[Araby] [771] upon the earth, the fine incessant needles of water playing in the
[Araby] [787] that week in her convent. Her brother and two other boys were
[Araby] [801] intervening days. I chafed against the work of school. At night in
[Araby] [802] my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between
[Araby] [804] were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated
[Araby] [807] it was not some Freemason affair. I answered few questions in
[Araby] [815] the bazaar in the evening. He was fussing at the hallstand, looking
[Araby] [820] As he was in the hall I could not go into the front parlour and lie at
[Araby] [821] the window. I left the house in bad humour and walked slowly
[Araby] [831] below in the street. Their cries reached me weakened and
[Araby] [851] At nine o'clock I heard my uncle's latchkey in the halldoor. I heard
[Araby] [857] "The people are in bed and after their first sleep now," he said.
[Araby] [865] believed in the old saying: "All work and no play makes Jack a
[Araby] [871] I held a florin tightly in my hand as I strode down Buckingham
[Araby] [874] journey. I took my seat in a third-class carriage of a deserted train.
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Araby] [880] the bare carriage. In a few minutes the train drew up beside an
[Araby] [882] by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten. In front
[Araby] [886] would be closed, I passed in quickly through a turnstile, handing a
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[Araby] [889] closed and the greater part of the hall was in darkness. I recognised
[Araby] [893] over which the words Cafe Chantant were written in coloured
[Araby] [929] make my interest in her wares seem the more real. Then I turned
[Araby] [931] the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a
[Eveline] [941] Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her
[Eveline] [947] new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which
[Eveline] [949] a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it--not
[Eveline] [951] roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field
[Eveline] [954] too grown up. Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field
[Eveline] [976] "He is in Melbourne now."
[Eveline] [979] She tried to weigh each side of the question. In her home anyway
[Eveline] [981] her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the
[Eveline] [982] house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores
[Eveline] [994] But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not
[Eveline] [998] sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew
[Eveline] [1004] dead and Harry, who was in the church decorating business, was
[Eveline] [1005] nearly always down somewhere in the country. Besides, the
[Eveline] [1012] much more, for he was usually fairly bad on Saturday night. In the
[Eveline] [1016] tightly in her hand as she elbowed her way through the crowds and
[Eveline] [1026] night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres
[Eveline] [1028] the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the
[Eveline] [1034] Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the
[Eveline] [1045] had fallen on his feet in Buenos Ayres, he said, and had come over
[Eveline] [1055] The evening deepened in the avenue. The white of two letters in
[Eveline] [1068] dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street
[Eveline] [1072] the last night of her mother's illness; she was again in the close
[Eveline] [1082] closing in final craziness. She trembled as she heard again her
[Eveline] [1087] She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must
[Eveline] [1090] had a right to happiness. Frank would take her in his arms, fold her
[Eveline] [1091] in his arms. He would save her.
[Eveline] [1093] She stood among the swaying crowd in the station at the North
[Eveline] [1098] boat, lying in beside the quay wall, with illumined portholes. She
[Eveline] [1105] distress awoke a nausea in her body and she kept moving her lips
[Eveline] [1106] in silent fervent prayer.
[Eveline] [1118] No! No! No! It was impossible. Her hands clutched the iron in
[After the Race] [1130] THE cars came scudding in towards Dublin, running evenly like
[After the Race] [1131] pellets in the groove of the Naas Road. At the crest of the hill at
[After the Race] [1132] Inchicore sightseers had gathered in clumps to watch the cars
[After the Race] [1144] acknowledged with smiles and nods by those in the car. In one of
[After the Race] [1147] Gallicism: in fact, these four young men were almost hilarious.
[After the Race] [1151] was in good humour because he had unexpectedly received some
[After the Race] [1152] orders in advance (he was about to start a motor establishment in
[After the Race] [1153] Paris) and Riviere was in good humour because he was to be
[After the Race] [1155] (who were cousins) were also in good humour because of the
[After the Race] [1156] success of the French cars. Villona was in good humour because
[After the Race] [1164] early. He had made his money as a butcher in Kingstown and by
[After the Race] [1165] opening shops in Dublin and in the suburbs he had made his
[After the Race] [1167] secure some of the police contracts and in the end he had become
[After the Race] [1168] rich enough to be alluded to in the Dublin newspapers as a
[After the Race] [1169] merchant prince. He had sent his son to England to be educated in
[After the Race] [1178] than acquaintances as yet but Jimmy found great pleasure in the
[After the Race] [1180] to own some of the biggest hotels in France. Such a person (as his
[After the Race] [1187] behind. Decidedly Villona was in excellent spirits; he kept up a
[After the Race] [1192] deft guess at the meaning and shout back a suitable answer in the
[After the Race] [1199] day in the company of these Continentals. At the control Segouin
[After the Race] [1200] had presented him to one of the French competitors and, in answer
[After the Race] [1206] great sum but Jimmy who, in spite of temporary errors, was at
[After the Race] [1210] been so conscious of the labour latent in money when there had
[After the Race] [1217] friendship the mite of Irish money was to be included in the capital
[After the Race] [1218] of the concern. Jimmy had a respect for his father's shrewdness in
[After the Race] [1219] business matters and in this case it had been his father who had
[After the Race] [1220] first suggested the investment; money to be made in the motor
[After the Race] [1223] car in which he sat. How smoothly it ran. In what style they had
[After the Race] [1234] that evening in Segouin's hotel and, meanwhile, Jimmy and his
[After the Race] [1238] northward with a curious feeling of disappointment in the exercise,
[After the Race] [1239] while the city hung its pale globes of light above them in a haze of
[After the Race] [1242] In Jimmy's house this dinner had been pronounced an occasion. A
[After the Race] [1246] well when he was dressed and, as he stood in the hall giving a last
[After the Race] [1258] Cambridge. The young men supped in a snug room lit by electric
[After the Race] [1270] Hungarian was about to prevail in ridicule of the spurious lutes of
[After the Race] [1281] strolled along Stephen's Green in a faint cloud of aromatic smoke.
[After the Race] [1285] a car in charge of another fat man. The car drove off and the short
[After the Race] [1297] bells. They took the train at Westland Row and in a few seconds,
[After the Race] [1305] singing Cadet Roussel in chorus, stamping their feet at every:
[After the Race] [1315] There was a yacht piano in the cabin. Villona played a waltz for
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[After the Race] [1349] bundled together. They began then to gather in what they had won.
[After the Race] [1352] He knew that he would regret in the morning but at present he was
[After the Race] [1356] door opened and he saw the Hungarian standing in a shaft of grey
[Two Gallants] [1364] and a mild warm air, a memory of summer, circulated in the
[Two Gallants] [1383] shoulder in toreador fashion. His breeches, his white rubber shoes
[Two Gallants] [1401] was tired for he had been talking all the afternoon in a
[Two Gallants] [1402] public-house in Dorset Street. Most people considered Lenehan a
[Two Gallants] [1403] leech but, in spite of this reputation, his adroitness and eloquence
[Two Gallants] [1406] them in a bar and of holding himself nimbly at the borders of the
[Two Gallants] [1407] company until he was included in a round. He was a sporting
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1427] fellow used to smoke.... I was afraid, man, she'd get in the family
[Two Gallants] [1432] "I told her I was out of a job," said Corley. "I told her I was in
[Two Gallants] [1447] and oily; it sweated in all weathers; and his large round hat, set
[Two Gallants] [1450] parade and, when he wished to gaze after someone in the street, it
[Two Gallants] [1454] walking with policemen in plain clothes, talking earnestly. He
[Two Gallants] [1497] way. I used to spend money on them right enough," he added, in a
[Two Gallants] [1569] Street. Not far from the porch of the club a harpist stood in the
[Two Gallants] [1575] master's hands. One hand played in the bass the melody of Silent,
[Two Gallants] [1576] O Moyle, while the other hand careered in the treble after each
[Two Gallants] [1588] curbstone, swinging a sunshade in one hand. Lenehan grew lively.
[Two Gallants] [1616] "Work it all right now," said Lenehan in farewell.
[Two Gallants] [1620] of his boots had something of the conqueror in them. He
[Two Gallants] [1636] carefully disordered and a big bunch of red flowers was pinned in
[Two Gallants] [1638] stout short muscular body. rank rude health glowed in her face, on
[Two Gallants] [1639] her fat red cheeks and in her unabashed blue eyes. Her features
[Two Gallants] [1641] open in a contented leer, and two projecting front teeth. As he
[Two Gallants] [1649] stepping lightly in his white shoes, down one side of Merrion
[Two Gallants] [1653] the pair in view until he had seen them climbing the stairs of the
[Two Gallants] [1674] ease in the dark quiet street, the sombre look of which suited his
[Two Gallants] [1676] over which the words Refreshment Bar were printed in white
[Two Gallants] [1696] He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility for his entry
[Two Gallants] [1700] examined him point by point before resuming their conversation in
[Two Gallants] [1706] In his imagination he beheld the pair of lovers walking along some
[Two Gallants] [1707] dark road; he heard Corley's voice in deep energetic gallantries and
[Two Gallants] [1711] intrigues. He would be thirty-one in November. Would he never
[Two Gallants] [1719] life, less vanquished in spirit. He might yet be able to settle down
[Two Gallants] [1720] in some snug corner and live happily if he could only come across
[Two Gallants] [1731] some figures in the crowd and sometimes made a critical remark.
[Two Gallants] [1732] One said that he had seen Mac an hour before in Westmoreland
[Two Gallants] [1734] before in Egan's. The young man who had seen Mac in
[Two Gallants] [1737] stood them drinks in Egan's.
[Two Gallants] [1747] took his stand in the shadow of a lamp and brought out one of the
[Two Gallants] [1769] in their walk. They were walking quickly, the young woman taking
[Two Gallants] [1787] Lenehan hurried on in the same direction. Some drops of light rain
[Two Gallants] [1801] He came level with his friend and looked keenly in his face. He
[Two Gallants] [1808] were composed in stern calm. Lenehan kept up with his friend,
[Two Gallants] [1817] coin shone in the palm.
[The Boarding House] [1824] Spring Gardens. But as soon as his father-in-law was dead Mr.
[The Boarding House] [1828] in the presence of customers and by buying bad meat he ruined his
[The Boarding House] [1838] day long he sat in the bailiff's room, waiting to be put on a job.
[The Boarding House] [1840] the butcher business and set up a boarding house in Hardwicke
[The Boarding House] [1851] and lodgings (beer or stout at dinner excluded). They shared in
[The Boarding House] [1855] son, who was clerk to a commission agent in Fleet Street, had the
[The Boarding House] [1857] obscenities: usually he came home in the small hours. When he
[The Boarding House] [1861] songs. On Sunday nights there would often be a reunion in Mrs.
[The Boarding House] [1875] Mrs. Mooney had first sent her daughter to be a typist in a
[The Boarding House] [1893] understanding but, though people in the house began to talk of the
[The Boarding House] [1895] little strange in her manner and the young man was evidently
[The Boarding House] [1898] deals with meat: and in this case she had made up her mind.
[The Boarding House] [1904] sent out constant peals and worshippers, singly or in groups,
[The Boarding House] [1907] volumes in their gloved hands. Breakfast was over in the boarding
[The Boarding House] [1910] bacon-rind. Mrs. Mooney sat in the straw arm-chair and watched
[The Boarding House] [1917] frank in her questions and Polly had been frank in her answers.
[The Boarding House] [1919] awkward by her not wishing to receive the news in too cavalier a
[The Boarding House] [1923] in her wise innocence she had divined the intention behind her
[The Boarding House] [1942] There must be reparation made in such case. It is all very well for
[The Boarding House] [1955] think he would face publicity. All the lodgers in the house knew
[The Boarding House] [1957] Besides, he had been employed for thirteen years in a great
[The Boarding House] [1963] Nearly the half-hour! She stood up and surveyed herself in the
[The Boarding House] [1975] out every ridiculous detail of the affair and in the end had so
[The Boarding House] [1981] else's business. He felt his heart leap warmly in his throat as he
[The Boarding House] [1982] heard in his excited imagination old Mr. Leonard calling out in his
[The Boarding House] [1988] existence of God to his companions in public- houses. But that was
[The Boarding House] [2004] While he was sitting helplessly on the side of the bed in shirt and
[The Boarding House] [2025] shone in the opening of her furry slippers and the blood glowed
[The Boarding House] [2029] On nights when he came in very late it was she who warmed up his
[The Boarding House] [2031] him alone, at night, in the sleeping house. And her thoughtfulness!
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[The Boarding House] [2077] end of the towel in the water-jug and refreshed her eyes with the
[The Boarding House] [2078] cool water. She looked at herself in profile and readjusted a
[The Boarding House] [2081] of them awakened in her mind secret, amiable memories. She
[A Little Cloud] [2109] remain unspoiled by such success. Gallaher's heart was in the right
[A Little Cloud] [2124] As he sat at his desk in the King's Inns he thought what changes
[A Little Cloud] [2140] had bought them in his bachelor days and many an evening, as he
[A Little Cloud] [2141] sat in the little room off the hall, he had been tempted to take one
[A Little Cloud] [2152] street. They stood or ran in the roadway or crawled up the steps
[A Little Cloud] [2156] the gaunt spectral mansions in which the old nobility of Dublin
[A Little Cloud] [2160] He had never been in Corless's but he knew the value of the name.
[A Little Cloud] [2169] walk swiftly in the street even by day and whenever he found
[A Little Cloud] [2170] himself in the city late at night he hurried on his way
[A Little Cloud] [2181] remember many signs of future greatness in his friend. People used
[A Little Cloud] [2184] money on all sides. In the end he had got mixed up in some shady
[A Little Cloud] [2187] something in Ignatius Gallaher that impressed you in spite of
[A Little Cloud] [2191] of Ignatius Gallaher's sayings when he was in a tight corner:
[A Little Cloud] [2199] Little Chandler quickened his pace. For the first time in his life he
[A Little Cloud] [2203] away. You could do nothing in Dublin. As he crossed Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2220] different moods and impressions that he wished to express in
[A Little Cloud] [2225] give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen.
[A Little Cloud] [2230] that, he would put in allusions. He began to invent sentences and
[A Little Cloud] [2241] to overmaster him and he halted before the door in indecision.
[A Little Cloud] [2260] signs of aging in me--eh, what? A little grey and thin on the top--
[A Little Cloud] [2274] have something new in your stuff. Damn proofs and printers, I say,
[A Little Cloud] [2277] better since I landed again in dear dirty Dublin.... Here you are,
[A Little Cloud] [2294] seems to be in a bad way. What's he doing?"
[A Little Cloud] [2300] "Yes; he's in the Land Commission."
[A Little Cloud] [2302] "I met him one night in London and he seemed to be very flush....
[A Little Cloud] [2312] want to knock about a bit in the world. Have you never been
[A Little Cloud] [2337] succeeded in catching the barman's eye. He ordered the same
[A Little Cloud] [2349] him. There was something vulgar in his friend which he had not
[A Little Cloud] [2350] observed before. But perhaps it was only the result of living in
[A Little Cloud] [2356] "Everything in Paris is gay," said Ignatius Gallaher. "They believe
[A Little Cloud] [2357] in enjoying life--and don't you think they're right? If you want to
[A Little Cloud] [2370] bits in Paris. Go to one of the students' balls, for instance. That's
[A Little Cloud] [2399] cigars and puffed at them in silence until their drinks were served.
[A Little Cloud] [2402] some time from the clouds of smoke in which he had taken refuge,
[A Little Cloud] [2406] Ignatius Gallaher puffed thoughtfully at his cigar and then, in a
[A Little Cloud] [2414] were fashionable in high society and ended by telling, with details,
[A Little Cloud] [2418] "Ah, well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "here we are in old jog- along
[A Little Cloud] [2434] "I hope it's not too late in the day to offer my best wishes," said
[A Little Cloud] [2440] "Well, Tommy," he said, "I wish you and yours every joy in life,
[A Little Cloud] [2477] "O, in that case..."
[A Little Cloud] [2508] finding himself with Gallaher in Corless's surrounded by lights and
[A Little Cloud] [2513] inferior in birth and education. He was sure that he could do
[A Little Cloud] [2516] chance. What was it that stood in his way? His unfortunate timidity
[A Little Cloud] [2517] He wished to vindicate himself in some way, to assert his
[A Little Cloud] [2529] Ignatius Gallaher in the act of drinking closed one eye expressively
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2544] "You'll put your head in the sack," repeated Little Chandler stoutly,
[A Little Cloud] [2548] betrayed himself; but, though the colour had heightened in his
[A Little Cloud] [2567] loudly. Then he looked thoughtfully before him and said in a
[A Little Cloud] [2570] "But I'm in no hurry. They can wait. I don't fancy tying myself up
[A Little Cloud] [2577] Little Chandler sat in the room off the hall, holding a child in his
[A Little Cloud] [2579] Monica came for an hour or so in the morning and an hour or so in
[A Little Cloud] [2583] coffee from Bewley's. Of course she was in a bad humour and gave
[A Little Cloud] [2587] two pounds of sugar. She put the sleeping child deftly in his arms
[A Little Cloud] [2593] light fell over a photograph which was enclosed in a frame of
[A Little Cloud] [2616] pretty. But he found something mean in it. Why was it so
[A Little Cloud] [2618] him. They repelled him and defied him: there was no passion in
[A Little Cloud] [2622] in the photograph?
[A Little Cloud] [2625] the room. He found something mean in the pretty furniture which
[A Little Cloud] [2636] began to read the first poem in the book:
[A Little Cloud] [2646] He paused. He felt the rhythm of the verse about him in the room.
[A Little Cloud] [2648] melancholy of his soul in verse? There were so many things he
[A Little Cloud] [2654] and fro in his arms but its wailing cry grew keener. He rocked it
[A Little Cloud] [2670] down the room with the child in his arms. It began to sob
[A Little Cloud] [2676] caught the child to his breast in fright. If it died!...
[A Little Cloud] [2678] The door was burst open and a young woman ran in, panting.
[A Little Cloud] [2692] his heart closed together as he met the hatred in them. He began to
[A Little Cloud] [2699] clasping the child tightly in her arms and murmuring:
[Counterparts] [2713] furious voice called out in a piercing North of Ireland accent:
[Counterparts] [2734] "Come in!"
[Counterparts] [2771] was passed and, if he could get the copy done in time, Mr. Alleyne
[Counterparts] [2790] He returned to his desk in the lower office and counted the sheets
[Counterparts] [2791] which remained to be copied. He took up his pen and dipped it in
[Counterparts] [2793] written: In no case shall the said Bernard Bodley be... The evening
[Counterparts] [2794] was falling and in a few minutes they would be lighting the gas:
[Counterparts] [2795] then he could write. He felt that he must slake the thirst in his
[Counterparts] [2808] corner and all at once dived into a doorway. He was now safe in
[Counterparts] [2817] counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom,
[Counterparts] [2821] of February and the lamps in Eustace Street had been lit. The man
[Counterparts] [2823] wondering whether he could finish his copy in time. On the stairs a
[Counterparts] [2825] Delacour had come while he was out in O'Neill's. He crammed his
[Counterparts] [2837] "I know that game," he said. "Five times in one day is a little bit...
[Counterparts] [2839] in the Delacour case for Mr. Alleyne."
[Counterparts] [2841] This address in the presence of the public, his run upstairs and the
[Counterparts] [2846] spend it in the bars, drinking with his friends amid the glare of gas
[Counterparts] [2855] she came. She was sitting beside his desk now in an aroma of
[Counterparts] [2857] great black feather in her hat. Mr. Alleyne had swivelled his chair
[Counterparts] [2866] desk. He stared intently at the incomplete phrase: In no case shall
[Counterparts] [2870] letters typed in time for post. The man listened to the clicking of
[Counterparts] [2876] it in time. He longed to execrate aloud, to bring his fist down on
[Counterparts] [2882] His body ached to do something, to rush out and revel in violence.
[Counterparts] [2891] standing outside the counter and all the clerks had turn round in
[Counterparts] [2912] There was a pause in the very breathing of the clerks. Everyone
[Counterparts] [2917] fist in the man's face till it seemed to vibrate like the knob of some
[Counterparts] [2929] He stood in a doorway opposite the office watching to see if the
[Counterparts] [2936] remember the way in which Mr. Alleyne had hounded little Peake
[Counterparts] [2937] out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew. He
[Counterparts] [2941] himself this time. Could he not keep his tongue in his cheek? But
[Counterparts] [2951] could he touch Pat in O'Neill's. He could not touch him for more
[Counterparts] [2956] pawn-office in Fleet Street. That was the dart! Why didn't he think
[Counterparts] [2961] going to have a good night of it. The clerk in Terry Kelly's said A
[Counterparts] [2962] crown! but the consignor held out for six shillings; and in the end
[Counterparts] [2965] his thumb and fingers. In Westmoreland Street the footpaths were
[Counterparts] [2973] in which he would narrate the incident to the boys:
[Counterparts] [2979] Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's
[Counterparts] [2982] drink in his turn. After a while O'Halloran and Paddy Leonard
[Counterparts] [2983] came in and the story was repeated to them. O'Halloran stood
[Counterparts] [2985] made to the chief clerk when he was in Callan's of Fownes's Street;
[Counterparts] [2986] but, as the retort was after the manner of the liberal shepherds in
[Counterparts] [2991] Just as they were naming their poisons who should come in but
[Counterparts] [2992] Higgins! Of course he had to join in with the others. The men
[Counterparts] [2995] exhilarating. Everyone roared laughing when he showed the way in
[Counterparts] [2996] which Mr. Alleyne shook his fist in Farrington's face. Then he
[Counterparts] [3020] hospitality was too Irish. He promised to get them in behind the
[Counterparts] [3024] the company in token that he understood he was being chaffed.
[Counterparts] [3026] and promised to meet them later on at Mulligan's in Poolbeg
[Counterparts] [3036] young man in a check suit came in and sat at a table close by.
[Counterparts] [3038] the Tivoli. Farrington's eyes wandered at every moment in the
[Counterparts] [3040] striking in her appearance. An immense scarf of peacock-blue
[Counterparts] [3041] muslin was wound round her hat and knotted in a great bow under
[Counterparts] [3046] The oblique staring expression in them fascinated him. She
[Counterparts] [3048] room, she brushed against his chair and said "O, pardon!" in a
[Counterparts] [3049] London accent. He watched her leave the room in the hope that she
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3104] twopence in his pocket. He cursed everything. He had done for
[Counterparts] [3105] himself in the office, pawned his watch, spent all his money; and
[Counterparts] [3107] longed to be back again in the hot reeking public-house. He had
[Counterparts] [3110] the woman in the big hat who had brushed against him and said
[Counterparts] [3114] body along in the shadow of the wall of the barracks. He loathed
[Counterparts] [3115] returning to his home. When he went in by the side- door he found
[Counterparts] [3141] "Light the lamp. What do you mean by having the place in
[Counterparts] [3142] darkness? Are the other children in bed?"
[Counterparts] [3161] "I'll teach you to let the fire out!" he said, rolling up his sleeve in
[Counterparts] [3173] clasped his hands together in the air and his voice shook with
[Clay] [3185] in the big copper boilers. The fire was nice and bright and on one
[Clay] [3195] always succeeded in making peace. One day the matron had said to
[Clay] [3212] Alphy had gone to Belfast on a Whit-Monday trip. In the purse
[Clay] [3216] wouldn't come in drunk. He was so different when he took any
[Clay] [3220] have felt herself in the way (though Joe's wife was ever so nice
[Clay] [3227] After the break-up at home the boys had got her that position in the
[Clay] [3231] people to live with. Then she had her plants in the conservatory
[Clay] [3239] women's room and began to pull the big bell. In a few minutes the
[Clay] [3240] women began to come in by twos and threes, wiping their
[Clay] [3241] steaming hands in their petticoats and pulling down the sleeves of
[Clay] [3244] with hot tea, already mixed with milk and sugar in huge tin cans.
[Clay] [3255] sup of porter to drink it in. And Maria laughed again till the tip of
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3276] people, with her toes barely touching the floor. She arranged in her
[Clay] [3278] to be independent and to have your own money in your pocket.
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3295] Henry Street. Here she was a long time in suiting herself and the
[Clay] [3304] She thought she would have to stand in the Drumcondra tram
[Clay] [3324] children had their Sunday dresses on. There were two big girls in
[Clay] [3334] look for her plumcake. She tried in Downes's bag and then in the
[Clay] [3340] Mrs. Donnelly said it was plain that Maria had left it behind her in
[Clay] [3348] was very nice with her. He told her all that went on in his office,
[Clay] [3361] Donnelly said there was port wine too in the house if she would
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3388] her hand out in the air as she was told to do. She moved her hand
[Clay] [3389] about here and there in the air and descended on one of the
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3417] I dreamt that I dwelt in marble halls
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3437] MR. JAMES DUFFY lived in Chapelizod because he wished to
[A Painful Case] [3440] and pretentious. He lived in an old sombre house and from his
[A Painful Case] [3444] every article of furniture in the room: a black iron bedstead, an
[A Painful Case] [3447] bookcase had been made in an alcove by means of shelves of
[A Painful Case] [3456] were always on the desk. In the desk lay a manuscript translation
[A Painful Case] [3458] were written in purple ink, and a little sheaf of papers held
[A Painful Case] [3459] together by a brass pin. In these sheets a sentence was inscribed
[A Painful Case] [3460] from time to time and, in an ironical moment, the headline of an
[A Painful Case] [3472] character; but there was no harshness in the eyes which, looking at
[A Painful Case] [3474] a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often
[A Painful Case] [3477] autobiographical habit which led him to compose in his mind from
[A Painful Case] [3478] time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in
[A Painful Case] [3479] the third person and a predicate in the past tense. He never gave
[A Painful Case] [3482] He had been for many years cashier of a private bank in Baggot
[A Painful Case] [3483] Street. Every morning he came in from Chapelizod by tram. At
[A Painful Case] [3486] he was set free. He dined in an eating-house in George's Street
[A Painful Case] [3488] and where there was a certain plain honesty in the bill of fare. His
[A Painful Case] [3499] regulate the civic life. He allowed himself to think that in certain
[A Painful Case] [3503] One evening he found himself sitting beside two ladies in the
[A Painful Case] [3513] permanently in his memory. When he learned that the young girl
[A Painful Case] [3525] He met her again a few weeks afterwards at a concert in Earlsfort
[A Painful Case] [3536] met always in the evening and chose the most quiet quarters for
[A Painful Case] [3540] encouraged his visits, thinking that his daughter's hand was in
[A Painful Case] [3543] interest in her. As the husband was often away and the daughter
[A Painful Case] [3551] Sometimes in return for his theories she gave out some fact of her
[A Painful Case] [3556] sober workmen in a garret lit by an inefficient oil-lamp. When the
[A Painful Case] [3558] and in its own garret, he had discontinued his attendances. The
[A Painful Case] [3560] they took in the question of wages was inordinate. He felt that they
[A Painful Case] [3577] room, their isolation, the music that still vibrated in their ears
[A Painful Case] [3581] that in her eyes he would ascend to an angelical stature; and, as he
[A Painful Case] [3594] confessional they meet in a little cakeshop near the Parkgate. It
[A Painful Case] [3595] was cold autumn weather but in spite of the cold they wandered up
[A Painful Case] [3598] sorrow. When they came out of the Park they walked in silence
[A Painful Case] [3606] pieces of music encumbered the music-stand in the lower room
[A Painful Case] [3608] Zarathustra and The Gay Science. He wrote seldom in the sheaf of
[A Painful Case] [3609] papers which lay in his desk. One of his sentences, written two
[A Painful Case] [3617] having dined moderately in George's Street and read the evening
[A Painful Case] [3622] themselves on a paragraph in the evening paper which he had
[A Painful Case] [3638] condensed in the wintry air. When he reached his house he went
[A Painful Case] [3649] Today at the City of Dublin Hospital the Deputy Coroner (in the
[A Painful Case] [3658] James Lennon, driver of the engine, stated that he had been in the
[A Painful Case] [3660] the guard's whistle he set the train in motion and a second or two
[A Painful Case] [3661] afterwards brought it to rest in response to loud cries. The train
[A Painful Case] [3682] the head had been injured in the fall. The injuries were not
[A Painful Case] [3683] sufficient to have caused death in a normal person. Death, in his
[A Painful Case] [3690] by the bridges, both by placing notices in every station and by the
[A Painful Case] [3692] been in the habit of crossing the lines late at night from platform to
[A Painful Case] [3693] platform and, in view of certain other circumstances of the case,
[A Painful Case] [3698] wife. He was not in Dublin at the time of the accident as he had
[A Painful Case] [3701] ago when his wife began to be rather intemperate in her habits.
[A Painful Case] [3703] Miss Mary Sinico said that of late her mother had been in the habit
[A Painful Case] [3707] a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence and exonerated
[A Painful Case] [3713] possibility of similar accidents in the future. No blame attached to
[A Painful Case] [3723] in some house on the Lucan road. What an end! The whole
[A Painful Case] [3737] outburst of that night and interpreted it in a harsher sense than he
[A Painful Case] [3738] had ever done. He had no difficulty now in approving of the course
[A Painful Case] [3746] public-house at Chapelizod Bridge he went in and ordered a hot
[A Painful Case] [3750] There were five or six workingmen in the shop discussing the
[A Painful Case] [3751] value of a gentleman's estate in County Kildare They drank at
[A Painful Case] [3762] alternately the two images in which he now conceived her, he
[A Painful Case] [3769] must have been, sitting night after night alone in that room. His
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[A Painful Case] [3784] redly and hospitably in the cold night. He looked down the slope
[A Painful Case] [3785] and, at the base, in the shadow of the wall of the Park, he saw
[A Painful Case] [3797] out of sight; but still he heard in his ears the laborious drone of the
[A Painful Case] [3801] pounding in his ears. He began to doubt the reality of what
[A Painful Case] [3803] to die away. He could not feel her near him in the darkness nor her
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3808] IVY DAY IN THE COMMITTEE ROOM
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3830] "Did Mr. Tierney say when he'd be back?" he asked in a sky
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3851] in the Royal Exchange Ward.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3856] let in the wet, he spent a great part of the day sitting by the fire in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3857] the Committee Room in Wicklow Street with Jack, the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3896] Mr. O'Connor shook his head in sympathy, and the old man fell
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3904] "What are you doing in the dark?" asked a voice.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3908] "Yes. What are you doing in the dark?" said Mr. Hynes. advancing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3922] of an election address. In the middle of the room was a small table
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3929] "Not yet," said Mr. O'Connor. "I hope to God he'll not leave us in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3952] Hasn't the working-man as good a right to be in the Corporation as
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3954] always hat in hand before any fellow with a handle to his name?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3960] He goes in to represent the labour classes. This fellow you're
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3969] working-man is not going to drag the honour of Dublin in the mud
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3979] in on the Nationalist ticket."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3989] down the collar of his coat, displaying, as he did so, an ivy leaf in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3998] some life in it then."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4001] snuffling nose and very cold ears pushed in the door. He walked
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4055] hand-me-down shop in Mary's Lane."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4060] men used to go in on Sunday morning before the houses were open
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4062] old father always had a tricky little black bottle up in a corner. Do
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4071] "I can't help it," said Mr. Henchy. "I expect to find the bailiffs in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4086] Mr. Henchy waited a few moments and then nodded in the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4089] "Tell me," he said across the fire, "what brings our friend in here?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4106] "Poor old Larry Hynes! Many a good turn he did in his day! But I'm
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4124] are in the pay of the Castle."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4142] "Come in!" said Mr. Henchy.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4144] A person resembling a poor clergyman or a poor actor appeared in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4157] that you? Come in!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4162] "Won't you come in and sit down?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4164] "No, no, no!" said Father Keon, speaking in a discreet, indulgent,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4169] come in and sit down a minute?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4200] "Fanning and himself seem to me very thick. They're often in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4223] leaning on the counter in his shirt-sleeves having a deep goster
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4234] "There's some deal on in that quarter," said Mr. O'Connor
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4248] "Driving out of the Mansion House," said Mr. Henchy, "in all my
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4249] vermin, with Jack here standing up behind me in a powdered wig
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4272] At this point there was a knock at the door, and a boy put in his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4277] "From the Black Eagle," said the boy, walking in sideways and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4312] loan of him. He means well, you know, in his own tinpot way."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4342] in a long breath of satisfaction.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4349] "Yes. I got him one or two sure things in Dawson Street, Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4356] whose blue serge clothes seemed to be in danger of falling from
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4358] face in expression, staring blue eyes and a grizzled moustache. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4373] and I out in the cold and rain looking for votes?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4375] "Why, blast your soul," said Mr. Henchy, "I'd get more votes in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4376] five minutes than you two'd get in a week."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4397] sufficient in itself, was that he had nothing to say; the second
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4404] In a few minutes an apologetic "Pok!" was heard as the cork flew
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4416] 'He's a respectable man,' said I. 'He's in favour of whatever will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4418] house property in the city and three places of business and isn't it
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4427] "Listen to me," said Mr. Henchy. "What we want in thus country,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4431] idle! Look at all the money there is in the country if we only
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4460] "In the name of God," said Mr. Henchy, "where's the analogy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4474] capture he said in a deep voice:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4479] only man that could keep that bag of cats in order. 'Down, ye dogs!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4480] Lie down, ye curs!' That's the way he treated them. Come in, Joe!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4481] Come in!" he called out, catching sight of Mr. Hynes in the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4484] Mr. Hynes came in slowly.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4524] rehearsing the piece in his mind. After a rather long pause he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4543] In palace, cabin or in cot
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4562] Of one who spurned them in his pride.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4577] Pledge in the cup she lifts to Joy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4584] it had ceased all the auditors drank from their bottles in silence.
[A Mother] [4605] the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in
[A Mother] [4609] educated in a high-class convent, where she had learned French
[A Mother] [4610] and music. As she was naturally pale and unbending in manner she
[A Mother] [4617] romantic desires by eating a great deal of Turkish Delight in
[A Mother] [4623] took place at intervals in his great brown beard. After the first year
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4629] him. At some party in a strange house when she lifted her eyebrow
[A Mother] [4637] paid her fees at the Academy. Every year in the month of July Mrs.
[A Mother] [4654] crossing of so man hands, and said good-bye to one another in
[A Mother] [4658] in the language movement. Mrs. Kearney was well content at this.
[A Mother] [4662] in the Antient Concert Rooms. She brought him into the
[A Mother] [4669] As Mr. Holohan was a novice in such delicate matters as the
[A Mother] [4675] slipped the doubtful items in between the old favourites. Mr.
[A Mother] [4677] point. She was invariably friendly and advising--homely, in fact.
[A Mother] [4687] blush-pink charmeuse in Brown Thomas's to let into the front of
[A Mother] [4698] look of things. A few young men, wearing bright blue badges in
[A Mother] [4699] their coats, stood idle in the vestibule; none of them wore evening
[A Mother] [4705] In the dressing-room behind the stage she was introduced to the
[A Mother] [4709] and that his accent was flat. He held a programme in his hand, and,
[A Mother] [4715] their music. When it was nearly half-past eight, the few people in
[A Mother] [4717] Fitzpatrick came in, smiled vacantly at the room, and said:
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4739] another on the platform and the few people in the hall grew fewer
[A Mother] [4741] expense for such a concert. There was something she didn't like in
[A Mother] [4753] jutting out his head and exchanging a laugh with two friends in the
[A Mother] [4754] corner of the balcony. In the course of the evening, Mrs. Kearney
[A Mother] [4765] Mr. Holohan seemed to be in a hurry; he advised her to speak to
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4784] appeared in all the evening papers, reminding the music loving
[A Mother] [4785] public of the treat which was in store for it on the following
[A Mother] [4789] her on Saturday night. She agreed. She respected her husband in
[A Mother] [4800] her daughter's clothes and music in charge of her husband and
[A Mother] [4803] member of the committee in the hall and, after a great deal of
[A Mother] [4825] in an office in the city and, as a boy, he had sung prolonged bass
[A Mother] [4826] notes in the resounding hall. From this humble state he had raised
[A Mother] [4827] himself until he had become a first-rate artiste. He had appeared in
[A Mother] [4829] had undertaken the part of the king in the opera of Maritana at the
[A Mother] [4832] marred the good impression by wiping his nose in his gloved hand
[A Mother] [4844] "Are you in it too? "
[A Mother] [4854] rapidly and a pleasant noise circulated in the auditorium. She came
[A Mother] [4869] Madam Glynn from London. Madam Glynn took her stand in a
[A Mother] [4880] while she strove to be polite, her eyes followed Mr. Holohan in his
[A Mother] [4905] suffused. The room was lively. Two men in outdoor dress had
[A Mother] [4908] O'Madden Burke. The Freeman man had come in to say that he
[A Mother] [4910] an American priest was giving in the Mansion House. He said they
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4914] in his hand and the aroma of cigar smoke floated near him. He had
[A Mother] [4917] Miss Healy stood in front of him, talking and laughing. He was old
[A Mother] [4919] in spirit to turn the moment to account. The warmth, fragrance and
[A Mother] [4927] Holohan, "and I'll see it in."
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [4947] ask her to lower her voice. The conversation of the others in the
[A Mother] [4958] Mr. Holohan and Mr. O'Madden Burke came into the room In a
[A Mother] [4961] the noise in the hall grew louder. Mr. Holohan became very red
[A Mother] [4975] After a swift struggle of tongues Mr. Holohan hobbled out in haste.
[A Mother] [4988] The noise in the auditorium had risen to a clamour when Mr.
[A Mother] [4990] panting. The clapping and stamping in the hall were punctuated by
[A Mother] [4991] whistling. Mr. Fitzpatrick held a few banknotes in his hand. He
[A Mother] [4997] But Kathleen gathered in her skirt and said: "Now. Mr. Bell," to
[A Mother] [4999] accompanist went out together. The noise in hall died away. There
[A Mother] [5003] Glynn's item. The poor lady sang Killarney in a bodiless gasping
[A Mother] [5015] All this time the dressing-room was a hive of excitement. In one
[A Mother] [5020] in Dublin after that, he said. The baritone was asked what did he
[A Mother] [5030] In another corner of the room were Mrs. Kearney and he: husband,
[A Mother] [5052] following Tuesday and that, in case her daughter did not play for
[A Mother] [5087] the second part to begin in the hope that the secretaries would
[A Mother] [5106] up and down the room, in order to cool himself for he his skin on
[A Mother] [5112] poised upon his umbrella in approval.
[Grace] [5116] TWO GENTLEMEN who were in the lavatory at the time tried to
[Grace] [5118] of the stairs down which he had fallen. They succeeded in turning
[Grace] [5126] stairs and laid him down again on the floor of the bar. In two
[Grace] [5149] who had carried him upstairs held a dinged silk hat in his hand.
[Grace] [5154] struggling to look in through the glass panels.
[Grace] [5161] licked the lead of his pencil and made ready to indite. He asked in
[Grace] [5166] A young man in a cycling-suit cleared his way through the ring of
[Grace] [5170] called for some brandy. The constable repeated the order in an
[Grace] [5172] brandy was forced down the man's throat. In a few seconds he
[Grace] [5176] "You're all right now?" asked the young man in the cycling- suit.
[Grace] [5213] The young man in the cycling-suit took the man by the other arm
[Grace] [5229] in to the laneway. The manager brought the constable to the stairs
[Grace] [5264] sheltering it in the shell of his hands, peered again into the mouth
[Grace] [5277] believed in the dignity of its calling. He had never been seen in the
[Grace] [5283] to allow him a little office in Crowe Street, on the window blind of
[Grace] [5292] Mr. Power, a much younger man, was employed in the Royal Irish
[Grace] [5293] Constabulary Office in Dublin Castle. The arc of his social rise
[Grace] [5298] debts were a byword in his circle; he was a debonair young man.
[Grace] [5302] Mr. Power sat downstairs in the kitchen asking the children where
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5321] long as he has money in his pocket to keep him out from his wife
[Grace] [5327] "I'm so sorry," she continued, "that I've nothing in the house to
[Grace] [5364] accompaniment. In her days of courtship, Mr. Kernan had seemed
[Grace] [5368] the Sea Church in Sandymount, leaning on the arm of a jovial
[Grace] [5369] well-fed man, who was dressed smartly in a frock-coat and
[Grace] [5376] sons were launched. One was in a draper's shop in Glasgow and
[Grace] [5377] the other was clerk to a tea- merchant in Belfast. They were good
[Grace] [5381] Mr. Kernan sent a letter to his office next day and remained in bed.
[Grace] [5394] irritable during the day, became more polite. He sat propped up in
[Grace] [5395] the bed by pillows and the little colour in his puffy cheeks made
[Grace] [5402] disclosed to Mrs. Kernan in the parlour. The idea been Mr.
[Grace] [5406] not been in the pale of the Church for twenty years. He was fond,
[Grace] [5419] association with cases in the police courts, had been tempered by
[Grace] [5420] brief immersions in the waters of general philosophy. He was well
[Grace] [5426] "I leave it all in your hands, Mr. Cunningham."
[Grace] [5431] She was tempted to see a curious appropriateness in his accident
[Grace] [5437] believed steadily in the Sacred Heart as the most generally useful
[Grace] [5440] believe also in the banshee and in the Holy Ghost.
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5458] driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland
[Grace] [5461] commission, a private inquiry agent, a clerk in the office of the
[Grace] [5463] Coroner. His new office made him professionally interested in Mr.
[Grace] [5476] "It keeps coming like from down in my throat; sickening."
[Grace] [5504] was known that the speaker had secret sources of information. In
[Grace] [5513] the partner of a very fat, short gentleman, Mr. Goldberg, in the
[Grace] [5516] smarted in person or by proxy under his exactions, spoke of him
[Grace] [5526] Mr. Harford's manners in drinking were silent. Mr. Power said
[Grace] [5552] made a crusade in search of valises and portmanteaus to enable
[Grace] [5553] Mrs. M'Coy to fulfil imaginary engagements in the country. More
[Grace] [5571] He assumed a thick, provincial accent and said in a tone of
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5582] you know, to drill. The sergeant makes them stand in a row against
[Grace] [5601] "It's like everything else in this world," he said. "You get some bad
[Grace] [5641] "We can meet in M'Auley's," said Mr. M'Coy. "That'll be the most
[Grace] [5656] "What's in the wind?"
[Grace] [5663] "No, no," said Mr. Cunningham in an evasive tone, "it's just a
[Grace] [5691] "D'ye know what, Tom, has just occurred to me? You night join in
[Grace] [5699] to his dignity to show a stiff neck. He took no part in the
[Grace] [5706] "They're the grandest order in the Church, Tom," said Mr.
[Grace] [5712] have influence. I'll tell you a case in point...."
[Grace] [5735] "They're all good men," said Mr. Cunningham, "each in his own
[Grace] [5745] "Of course I'm right," said Mr. Cunningham. "I haven't been in the
[Grace] [5750] Kernan seemed to be weighing something in his mind. He was
[Grace] [5771] friendly talk, you know, in a common-sense way."
[Grace] [5794] his discourse now. Crofton and I were in the back of the... pit, you
[Grace] [5799] "Yes, in the back near the door. I forget now what.... O yes, it was
[Grace] [5808] Orangeman too. We went into Butler's in Moore Street--faith, was
[Grace] [5813] "There's a good deal in that," said Mr. Power. "There used always
[Grace] [5814] be crowds of Protestants in the chapel where Father Tom was
[Grace] [5819] "We both believe in----"
[Grace] [5823] "... in the Redeemer. Only they don't believe in the Pope and in the
[Grace] [5839] "O, come in! come in!"
[Grace] [5842] trailing moustache was repeated in the fair eyebrows looped above
[Grace] [5844] had failed in business in a licensed house in the city because his
[Grace] [5870] "I often heard he was one of the most intellectual men in Europe,"
[Grace] [5877] was Lux in Tenebris, I think--Light in Darkness."
[Grace] [5916] Leo's poems was on the invention of the photograph--in Latin, of
[Grace] [5933] Mr. Kernan seemed to be troubled in mind. He made an effort to
[Grace] [5934] recall the Protestant theology on some thorny points and in the end
[Grace] [5967] scene in the whole history of the Church."
[Grace] [5973] "In the sacred college, you know, of cardinals and archbishops and
[Grace] [6016] in the minds of his hearers. His deep, raucous voice had thrilled
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6080] lighted candles in our hands and renew our baptismal vows."
[Grace] [6113] The transept of the Jesuit Church in Gardiner Street was almost
[Grace] [6120] marble and on lugubrious canvases. The gentlemen sat in the
[Grace] [6122] and laid their hats in security. They sat well back and gazed
[Grace] [6126] In one of the benches near the pulpit sat Mr. Cunningham and Mr.
[Grace] [6127] Kernan. In the bench behind sat Mr. M'Coy alone: and in the bench
[Grace] [6129] unsuccessfully to find a place in the bench with the others, and,
[Grace] [6130] when the party had settled down in the form of a quincunx, he had
[Grace] [6134] stimulus. In a whisper, Mr. Cunningham drew Mr. Kernan's
[Grace] [6140] Hogan's nephew, who was up for the job in the Town Clerk's
[Grace] [6141] office. Farther in front sat Mr. Hendrick, the chief reporter of The
[Grace] [6155] upright in the pulpit, two-thirds of its bulk, crowned by a massive
[Grace] [6167] "For the children of this world are wiser in their generation than
[Grace] [6173] one of the most difficult texts in all the Scriptures, he said, to
[Grace] [6178] the life of the world and who yet wished to lead that life not in the
[Grace] [6183] forced to live in the world, and, to a certain extent, for the world:
[Grace] [6184] and in this sentence He designed to give them a word of counsel,
[Grace] [6185] setting before them as exemplars in the religious life those very
[Grace] [6187] in matters religious.
[Grace] [6192] speak to them in a businesslike way. If he might use the metaphor,
[Grace] [6203] accounts tallied in every point to say:
[The Dead] [6220] scamper along the bare hallway to let in another guest. It was well
[The Dead] [6233] gone off in splendid style, as long as anyone could remember; ever
[The Dead] [6235] the house in Stoney Batter and taken Mary Jane, their only niece,
[The Dead] [6236] to live with them in the dark, gaunt house on Usher's Island, the
[The Dead] [6239] it was a day. Mary Jane, who was then a little girl in short clothes,
[The Dead] [6240] was now the main prop of the household, for she had the organ in
[The Dead] [6242] pupils' concert every year in the upper room of the Antient Concert
[The Dead] [6246] leading soprano in Adam and Eve's, and Kate, being too feeble to
[The Dead] [6248] piano in the back room. Lily, the caretaker's daughter, did
[The Dead] [6250] believed in eating well; the best of everything: diamond-bone
[The Dead] [6252] seldom made a mistake in the orders, so that she got on well with
[The Dead] [6298] surname and glanced at her. She was a slim; growing girl, pale in
[The Dead] [6299] complexion and with hay-coloured hair. The gas in the pantry
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6329] pushed upwards even to his forehead, where it scattered itself in a
[The Dead] [6333] glossy black hair was parted in the middle and brushed in a long
[The Dead] [6350] the stairs and waving his hand to her in deprecation.
[The Dead] [6371] had failed with the girl in the pantry. He had taken up a wrong
[The Dead] [6379] shadows, was her large flaccid face. Though she was stout in build
[The Dead] [6384] apple, and her hair, braided in the same old-fashioned way, had not
[The Dead] [6397] east wind blowing in after we passed Merrion. Very jolly it was.
[The Dead] [6405] "But as for Gretta there," said Gabriel, "she'd walk home in the
[The Dead] [6452] "0, the room is all right," replied Gabriel. "I've taken one in the
[The Dead] [6488] hear two persons talking in the pantry. Then he recognised Freddy
[The Dead] [6492] here. I always feel easier in my mind when he's here.... Julia,
[The Dead] [6502] Miss Furlong. Take them in, Julia, with Miss Daly and Miss
[The Dead] [6506] his moustache bristled and smiling in all his wrinkles. "You know,
[The Dead] [6516] a sideboard for viands and sweets. At a smaller sideboard in one
[The Dead] [6519] Mr. Browne led his charges thither and invited them all, in jest, to
[The Dead] [6530] ladies laughed in musical echo to his pleasantry, swaying their
[The Dead] [6546] with one instinct, received his speech in silence. Miss Furlong,
[The Dead] [6552] A red-faced young woman, dressed in pansy, came into the room,
[The Dead] [6573] "I don't mind in the least, Miss Morkan."
[The Dead] [6588] Julia, who was carrying in a column of table-napkins, turned to her
[The Dead] [6593] In fact right behind her Gabriel could be seen piloting Freddy
[The Dead] [6600] scanty hair made him look sleepy. He was laughing heartily in a
[The Dead] [6607] Freddy Malins bade the Misses Morkan good-evening in what
[The Dead] [6608] seemed an offhand fashion by reason of the habitual catch in his
[The Dead] [6611] repeat in an undertone the story he had just told to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6625] by frowning and shaking her forefinger in warning to and fro. Mr.
[The Dead] [6626] Browne nodded in answer and, when she had gone, said to Freddy
[The Dead] [6634] Malins' attention to a disarray in his dress, filled out and handed
[The Dead] [6636] glass mechanically, his right hand being engaged in the
[The Dead] [6640] reached the climax of his story, in a kink of high-pitched
[The Dead] [6652] refreshment-room to stand in the doorway at the sound of the
[The Dead] [6653] piano, had gone away quietly in couples after a few minutes. The
[The Dead] [6656] the pauses like those of a priestess in momentary imprecation, and
[The Dead] [6661] A picture of the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet hung there and
[The Dead] [6662] beside it was a picture of the two murdered princes in the Tower
[The Dead] [6663] which Aunt Julia had worked in red, blue and brown wools when
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6673] was pointing out something in it to Constantine who, dressed in a
[The Dead] [6676] life. Thanks to her, Constantine was now senior curate in
[The Dead] [6678] in the Royal University. A shadow passed over his face as he
[The Dead] [6680] phrases she had used still rankled in his memory; she had once
[The Dead] [6683] long illness in their house at Monkstown.
[The Dead] [6688] down in his heart. The piece ended with a trill of octaves in the
[The Dead] [6689] treble and a final deep octave in the bass. Great applause greeted
[The Dead] [6692] the four young men in the doorway who had gone away to the
[The Dead] [6699] low-cut bodice and the large brooch which was fixed in the front
[The Dead] [6727] wrote a literary column every Wednesday in The Daily Express,
[The Dead] [6732] every day when his teaching in the college was ended he used to
[The Dead] [6735] Quay, or to O'Clohissey's in the bystreet. He did not know how to
[The Dead] [6741] lamely that he saw nothing political in writing reviews of books.
[The Dead] [6744] inattentive. Miss Ivors promptly took his hand in a warm grasp and
[The Dead] [6745] said in a soft friendly tone:
[The Dead] [6757] splendid out in the Atlantic. You ought to come. Mr. Clancy is
[The Dead] [6782] "Well," said Gabriel, "it's partly to keep in touch with the
[The Dead] [6785] "And haven't you your own language to keep in touch with--
[The Dead] [6814] Gabriel tried to cover his agitation by taking part in the dance with
[The Dead] [6816] expression on her face. But when they met in the long chain he
[The Dead] [6826] stout feeble old woman with white hair. Her voice had a catch in it
[The Dead] [6830] married daughter in Glasgow and came to Dublin on a visit once a
[The Dead] [6833] of the beautiful house her daughter kept in Glasgow, and of all the
[The Dead] [6839] call him a West Briton before people, even in joke. She had tried
[The Dead] [6851] "She's sending in the younger ones first as soon as this waltz is
[The Dead] [6880] Gabriel what beautiful places there were in Scotland and beautiful
[The Dead] [6881] scenery. Her son-in-law brought them every year to the lakes and
[The Dead] [6882] they used to go fishing. Her son-in-law was a splendid fisher. One
[The Dead] [6883] day he caught a beautiful big fish and the man in the hotel cooked
[The Dead] [6892] who still remained in the drawing room seemed tired of dancing
[The Dead] [6893] and were conversing quietly in little groups. Gabriel's warm
[The Dead] [6903] He repeated to himself a phrase he had written in his review: "One
[The Dead] [6910] not be sorry to see him fail in his speech. An idea came into his
[The Dead] [6920] A murmur in the room attracted his attention. Mr. Browne was
[The Dead] [6928] strong and clear in tone, attacked with great spirit the runs which
[The Dead] [6933] others at the close of the song and loud applause was borne in
[The Dead] [6935] colour struggled into Aunt Julia's face as she bent to replace in the
[The Dead] [6940] who nodded her head gravely and slowly in acquiescence. At last,
[The Dead] [6942] across the room to Aunt Julia whose hand he seized and held in
[The Dead] [6943] both his hands, shaking it when words failed him or the catch in
[The Dead] [6955] near him in the manner of a showman introducing a prodigy to an
[The Dead] [6975] simply thrown away in that choir. But she never would be said by
[The Dead] [6979] refractory child while Aunt Julia gazed in front of her, a vague
[The Dead] [6983] slaving there in that choir night and day, night and day. Six o'clock
[The Dead] [6999] in defence of her sister for it was a sore subject with her but Mary
[The Dead] [7012] were in Julia's place I'd tell that Father Healey straight up to his
[The Dead] [7027] would not stay. She did not feel in the least hungry and she had
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7066] departure. But she did not seem to be in ill humour: she had gone
[The Dead] [7070] almost wringing her hands in despair.
[The Dead] [7073] everyone waiting in there, stage to let, and nobody to carve the
[The Dead] [7090] in gold and silver papers and a glass vase in which stood some tall
[The Dead] [7091] celery stalks. In the centre of the table there stood, as sentries to a
[The Dead] [7095] piano a pudding in a huge yellow dish lay in waiting and behind it
[The Dead] [7118] of hot floury potatoes wrapped in a white napkin. This was Mary
[The Dead] [7133] the table, walking on each other's heels, getting in each other's way
[The Dead] [7152] He set to his supper and took no part in the conversation with
[The Dead] [7159] chieftain singing in the second part of the Gaiety pantomime who
[The Dead] [7183] something like singing to be heard in Dublin. He told too of how
[The Dead] [7187] gallery boys would sometimes in their enthusiasm unyoke the
[The Dead] [7199] "In London, Paris, Milan," said Mr. Bartell D'Arcy warmly. "I
[The Dead] [7215] was in his prime and I think he had then the purest tenor voice that
[The Dead] [7244] son was going down to Mount Melleray in a week or so. The table
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7261] two in the morning and slept in their coffins. He asked what they
[The Dead] [7271] committed by all the sinners in the outside world. The explanation
[The Dead] [7279] As the subject had grown lugubrious it was buried in a silence of
[The Dead] [7281] neighbour in an indistinct undertone:
[The Dead] [7298] The patting at once grew louder in encouragement and then ceased
[The Dead] [7303] the drawing-room door. People, perhaps, were standing in the
[The Dead] [7305] listening to the waltz music. The air was pure there. In the distance
[The Dead] [7314] "It has fallen to my lot this evening, as in years past, to perform a
[The Dead] [7322] while I endeavour to express to you in words what my feelings are
[The Dead] [7331] He made a circle in the air with his arm and paused. Everyone
[The Dead] [7347] have handed down to us and which we in turn must hand down to
[The Dead] [7352] away discourteously: and he said with confidence in himself:
[The Dead] [7356] "A new generation is growing up in our midst, a generation
[The Dead] [7359] misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7368] least, that in gatherings such as this we shall still speak of them
[The Dead] [7369] with pride and affection, still cherish in our hearts the memory of
[The Dead] [7376] inflection, "there are always in gatherings such as this sadder
[The Dead] [7388] everyday routine. We are met here as friends, in the spirit of
[The Dead] [7389] good-fellowship, as colleagues, also to a certain extent, in the true
[The Dead] [7394] Julia vainly asked each of her neighbours in turn to tell her what
[The Dead] [7400] Gabriel, who continued in the same vein:
[The Dead] [7407] For when I view them in turn, whether it be our chief hostess
[The Dead] [7426] in their profession and the position of honour and affection which
[The Dead] [7427] they hold in our hearts."
[The Dead] [7429] All the guests stood up, glass in hand, and turning towards the
[The Dead] [7430] three seated ladies, sang in unison, with Mr. Browne as leader:
[The Dead] [7439] pudding-fork and the singers turned towards one another, as if in
[The Dead] [7475] "He has been laid on here like the gas," said Aunt Kate in the same
[The Dead] [7481] "But tell him to come in, Mary Jane, and close the door. I hope to
[The Dead] [7484] At that moment the hall-door was opened and Mr. Browne came in
[The Dead] [7486] dressed in a long green overcoat with mock astrakhan cuffs and
[The Dead] [7489] whistling was borne in.
[The Dead] [7491] "Teddy will have all the cabs in Dublin out," he said.
[The Dead] [7516] a rattling fine walk in the country or a fast drive with a good
[The Dead] [7529] explained Gabriel, "commonly known in his later years as the old
[The Dead] [7536] by the name of Johnny. And Johnny used to work in the old
[The Dead] [7537] gentleman's mill, walking round and round in order to drive the
[The Dead] [7540] out with the quality to a military review in the park."
[The Dead] [7547] collar and drove out in grand style from his ancestral mansion
[The Dead] [7553] "O, now, Gabriel, he didn't live in Back Lane, really. Only the mill
[The Dead] [7558] Johnny came in sight of King Billy's statue: and whether he fell in
[The Dead] [7560] was back again in the mill, anyhow he began to walk round the
[The Dead] [7563] Gabriel paced in a circle round the hall in his goloshes amid the
[The Dead] [7573] Mary Jane ran to open it and let in Freddy Malins. Freddy Malins,
[The Dead] [7581] "Yes," said Aunt Kate. "Better not keep Mrs. Malins standing in
[The Dead] [7586] Malins clambered in after her and spent a long time settling her on
[The Dead] [7598] was speechless with laughter. He popped his head in and out of the
[The Dead] [7621] Gabriel had not gone to the door with the others. He was in a dark
[The Dead] [7623] near the top of the first flight, in the shadow also. He could not see
[The Dead] [7632] He stood still in the gloom of the hall, trying to catch the air that
[The Dead] [7634] and mystery in her attitude as if she were a symbol of something.
[The Dead] [7635] He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the
[The Dead] [7637] painter he would paint her in that attitude. Her blue felt hat would
[The Dead] [7650] hand for them to be silent. The song seemed to be in the old Irish
[The Dead] [7677] break off like that when we were all in raptures listening to you."
[The Dead] [7699] years; and I read this morning in the newspapers that the snow is
[The Dead] [7711] in a repentant tone told them the history of his cold. Everyone gave
[The Dead] [7713] careful of his throat in the night air. Gabriel watched his wife, who
[The Dead] [7714] did not join in the conversation. She was standing right under the
[The Dead] [7717] She was in the same attitude and seemed unaware of the talk about
[The Dead] [7731] "It's a very nice air," said Mary Jane. "I'm sorry you were not in
[The Dead] [7764] lamps were still burning redly in the murky air and, across the
[The Dead] [7769] in a brown parcel tucked under one arm and her hands holding her
[The Dead] [7782] Birds were twittering in the ivy and the sunny web of the curtain
[The Dead] [7786] in the cold, looking in through a grated window at a man making
[The Dead] [7787] bottles in a roaring furnace. It was very cold. Her face, fragrant in
[The Dead] [7797] coursing in warm flood along his arteries. Like the tender fire of
[The Dead] [7804] all their souls' tender fire. In one letter that he had written to her
[The Dead] [7811] her. When the others had gone away, when he and she were in the
[The Dead] [7812] room in the hotel, then they would be alone together. He would
[The Dead] [7818] Then something in his voice would strike her. She would turn and
[The Dead] [7826] old rattling box after his heels, and Gabriel was again in a cab with
[The Dead] [7843] When the cab drew up before the hotel, Gabriel jumped out and, in
[The Dead] [7851] She leaned for a moment on his arm in getting out of the cab and
[The Dead] [7864] An old man was dozing in a great hooded chair in the hall. He lit a
[The Dead] [7865] candle in the office and went before them to the stairs. They
[The Dead] [7866] followed him in silence, their feet falling in soft thuds on the
[The Dead] [7868] her head bowed in the ascent, her frail shoulders curved as with a
[The Dead] [7872] palms of his hands held the wild impulse of his body in check. The
[The Dead] [7874] halted, too, on the steps below him. In the silence Gabriel could
[The Dead] [7880] hour they were to be called in the morning.
[The Dead] [7895] A ghastly light from the street lamp lay in a long shaft from one
[The Dead] [7898] the street in order that his emotion might calm a little. Then he
[The Dead] [7932] Gabriel in a false voice. "He gave me back that sovereign I lent
[The Dead] [7940] brutal. No, he must see some ardour in her eyes first. He longed to
[The Dead] [7951] in Henry Street."
[The Dead] [7953] He was in such a fever of rage and desire that he did not hear her
[The Dead] [7966] with his. Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in
[The Dead] [7983] She did not answer at once. Then she said in an outburst of tears:
[The Dead] [7989] moment in astonishment and then followed her. As he passed in
[The Dead] [7990] the way of the cheval-glass he caught sight of himself in full
[The Dead] [7992] always puzzled him when he saw it in a mirror, and his
[The Dead] [8009] "It was a person I used to know in Galway when I was living with
[The Dead] [8014] began to glow angrily in his veins.
[The Dead] [8016] "Someone you were in love with?" he asked ironically.
[The Dead] [8023] interested in this delicate boy.
[The Dead] [8026] he had: big, dark eyes! And such an expression in them--an
[The Dead] [8029] "O, then, you are in love with him?" said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [8031] "I used to go out walking with him," she said, "when I was in
[The Dead] [8039] She looked at him and asked in surprise:
[The Dead] [8049] window in silence.
[The Dead] [8056] "He was in the gasworks," she said.
[The Dead] [8059] evocation of this figure from the dead, a boy in the gasworks.
[The Dead] [8062] in her mind with another. A shameful consciousness of his own
[The Dead] [8067] of in the mirror. Instinctively he turned his back more to the light
[The Dead] [8073] "I suppose you were in love with this Michael Furey, Gretta," he
[The Dead] [8088] being was coming against him, gathering forces against him in its
[The Dead] [8096] "It was in the winter," she said, "about the beginning of the winter
[The Dead] [8098] the convent. And he was ill at the time in his lodgings in Galway
[The Dead] [8099] and wouldn't be let out, and his people in Oughterard were written
[The Dead] [8100] to. He was in decline, they said, or something like that. I never
[The Dead] [8107] Gabriel, like the way they do in the country. He was going to study
[The Dead] [8116] would be back in the summer, and hoping he would be better
[The Dead] [8122] "Then the night before I left, I was in my grandmother's house in
[The Dead] [8131] his death in the rain. But he said he did not want to live. I can see
[The Dead] [8137] "Yes, he went home. And when I was only a week in the convent
[The Dead] [8138] he died and he was buried in Oughterard, where his people came
[The Dead] [8142] herself face downward on the bed, sobbing in the quilt. Gabriel
[The Dead] [8156] her deep-drawn breath. So she had had that romance in her life: a
[The Dead] [8158] poor a part he, her husband, had played in her life. He watched her
[The Dead] [8161] her hair: and, as he thought of what she must have been then, in
[The Dead] [8173] and dancing, the merry-making when saying good-night in the hall,
[The Dead] [8174] the pleasure of the walk along the river in the snow. Poor Aunt
[The Dead] [8178] Soon, perhaps, he would be sitting in that same drawing-room,
[The Dead] [8179] dressed in black, his silk hat on his knees. The blinds would be
[The Dead] [8182] would cast about in his mind for some words that might console
[The Dead] [8189] that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her
[The Dead] [8196] be love. The tears gathered more thickly in his eyes and in the
[The Dead] [8203] time reared and lived in, was dissolving and dwindling.