Dubliners by James Joyce
looking

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

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The concordance for Dubliners ordered alphanumerically,
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There are 36 occurrences of the word:   looking

[The Sisters] [57] looking up from my plate. He returned to his pipe and finally spat
[The Sisters] [266] "There's poor Nannie," said Eliza, looking at her, "she's wore out.
[An Encounter] [507] looking at the high masts, saw, or imagined, the geography which
[An Encounter] [561] ground with his stick, so slowly that I thought he was looking for
[An Encounter] [609] There was nothing he liked, he said, so much as looking at a nice
[An Encounter] [682] without looking at him, called loudly across the field:
[Araby] [735] teased her before he obeyed and I stood by the railings looking at
[Araby] [815] the bazaar in the evening. He was fussing at the hallstand, looking
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[After the Race] [1162] moustache and rather innocent-looking grey eyes. His father, who
[Two Gallants] [1675] mood. He paused at last before the window of a poor-looking shop
[The Boarding House] [2076] dried her eyes and went over to the looking-glass. She dipped the
[A Little Cloud] [2234] was not more Irish-looking. Perhaps it would be better to insert his
[A Little Cloud] [2273] looking for copy and sometimes not finding it: and then, always to
[Counterparts] [2968] evening editions. The man passed through the crowd, looking on
[Clay] [3232] and she liked looking after them. She had lovely ferns and
[Clay] [3308] moustache. Maria thought he was a colonel-looking gentleman and
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3472] character; but there was no harshness in the eyes which, looking at
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3968] not looking for fat jobs for his sons and nephews and cousins. The
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4165] velvety voice. "Don't let me disturb you now! I'm just looking for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4373] and I out in the cold and rain looking for votes?"
[A Mother] [4801] went all over the building looking for Mr. Holohan or Mr.
[Grace] [6033] crabbed-looking old chap, looking at him from under his bushy
[Grace] [6073] "Get behind me, Satan!" said Mr. Fogarty, laughing and looking at
[Grace] [6150] A powerful-looking figure, the upper part of which was draped
[The Dead] [6325] looking at her, kicked off his goloshes and flicked actively with his
[The Dead] [6582] when Aunt Julia wandered slowly into the room, looking behind
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6931] looking at the singer's face, was to feel and share the excitement of
[The Dead] [7494] struggling into his overcoat and, looking round the hall, said:
[The Dead] [7786] in the cold, looking in through a grated window at a man making
[The Dead] [7823] looking out of the window and seemed tired. The others spoke
[The Dead] [7919] She went on to the window and stood there, looking out. Gabriel
[The Dead] [7955] looking at him strangely. Then, suddenly raising herself on tiptoe