Dubliners by James Joyce
man

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 228 occurrences of the word:   man

[The Sisters] [61] say to a man like that."
[The Sisters] [326] "Yes," said my aunt. "He was a disappointed man. You could see
[An Encounter] [413] any more of this wretched stuff in this college. The man who wrote
[An Encounter] [523] was a tall man who amused the crowd on the quay by calling out
[An Encounter] [549] the bank for some time without speaking I saw a man approaching
[An Encounter] [585] which agitated and pained me because I was afraid the man would
[An Encounter] [586] think I was as stupid as Mahony. The man, however, only smiled. I
[An Encounter] [589] mentioned lightly that he had three totties. The man asked me how
[An Encounter] [593] "Tell us," said Mahony pertly to the man, "how many have you
[An Encounter] [596] The man smiled as before and said that when he was our age he
[An Encounter] [601] His attitude on this point struck me as strangely liberal in a man of
[An Encounter] [640] whether I would go away or not when the man came back and sat
[An Encounter] [643] pursued her across the field. The man and I watched the chase. The
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [663] The man continued his monologue. He seemed to have forgotten
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[Eveline] [944] Few people passed. The man out of the last house passed on his
[Eveline] [949] a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it--not
[After the Race] [1150] Villona and a neatly groomed young man named Doyle. Segouin
[After the Race] [1284] Grafton Street a short fat man was putting two handsome ladies on
[After the Race] [1285] a car in charge of another fat man. The car drove off and the short
[After the Race] [1286] fat man caught sight of the party.
[After the Race] [1299] Station. The ticket-collector saluted Jimmy; he was an old man:
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[Two Gallants] [1417] "One night, man," he said, "I was going along Dame Street and I
[Two Gallants] [1422] man, I met her by appointment. We vent out to Donnybrook and I
[Two Gallants] [1424] dairyman.... It was fine, man. Cigarettes every night she'd bring me
[Two Gallants] [1427] fellow used to smoke.... I was afraid, man, she'd get in the family
[Two Gallants] [1479] man. She's a bit gone on me."
[Two Gallants] [1494] "girls off the South Circular. I used to take them out, man, on the
[Two Gallants] [1734] before in Egan's. The young man who had seen Mac in
[The Boarding House] [1835] enlist himself as a sheriff's man. He was a shabby stooped little
[The Boarding House] [1842] population made up of tourists from Liverpool and the Isle of Man
[The Boarding House] [1876] corn-factor's office but, as a disreputable sheriff's man used to
[The Boarding House] [1895] little strange in her manner and the young man was evidently
[The Boarding House] [1934] assuming that he was a man of honour and he had simply abused
[The Boarding House] [1937] be his excuse since he was a man who had seen something of the
[The Boarding House] [1943] the man: he can go his ways as if nothing had happened, having
[The Boarding House] [1952] would win. He was a serious young man, not rakish or loud-voiced
[The Boarding House] [1986] diligence thrown away! As a young man he had sown his wild oats,
[A Little Cloud] [2117] gave one the idea of being a little man. His hands were white and
[A Little Cloud] [2315] "I've been to the Isle of Man," said Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2319] "The Isle of Man!" he said. "Go to London or Paris: Paris, for
[A Little Cloud] [2360] from Ireland they were ready to eat me, man."
[A Little Cloud] [2473] "I'm awfully sorry, old man. You see I'm over here with another
[A Little Cloud] [2558] "Why, man alive," said Ignatius Gallaher, vehemently, "do you
[A Little Cloud] [2701] "My little man! My little mannie! Was 'ou frightened, love?...
[Counterparts] [2717] Miss Parker returned to her machine, saying to a man who was
[Counterparts] [2722] The man muttered "Blast him!" under his breath and pushed back
[Counterparts] [2736] The man entered Mr. Alleyne's room. Simultaneously Mr. Alleyne,
[Counterparts] [2737] a little man wearing gold-rimmed glasses on a cleanshaven face,
[Counterparts] [2765] Mr. Alleyne bent his head again upon his pile of papers. The man
[Counterparts] [2769] sharp sensation of thirst. The man recognised the sensation and felt
[Counterparts] [2786] The man walked heavily towards the door and, as he went out of
[Counterparts] [2800] "It's all right, Mr. Shelley," said the man, pointing with his finger
[Counterparts] [2805] man pulled a shepherd's plaid cap out of his pocket, put it on his
[Counterparts] [2815] The curate brought him a glass of plain porter. The man drank it at
[Counterparts] [2821] of February and the lamps in Eustace Street had been lit. The man
[Counterparts] [2832] The man glanced at the two clients who were standing at the
[Counterparts] [2842] porter he had gulped down so hastily confused the man and, as he
[Counterparts] [2859] knee. The man put the correspondence on the desk and bowed
[Counterparts] [2865] The man returned to the lower office and sat down again at his
[Counterparts] [2870] letters typed in time for post. The man listened to the clicking of
[Counterparts] [2892] anticipation of something. The man got up from his desk. Mr.
[Counterparts] [2894] missing. The man answered that he knew nothing about them, that
[Counterparts] [2896] and violent that the man could hardly restrain his fist from
[Counterparts] [2906] The man glanced from the lady's face to the little egg-shaped head
[Counterparts] [2932] say a word to him when he was with the chief clerk. The man felt
[Counterparts] [2946] money, but sure Higgins never had anything for himself. A man
[Counterparts] [2968] evening editions. The man passed through the crowd, looking on
[Counterparts] [3023] he was a married man; and Farrington's heavy dirty eyes leered at
[Counterparts] [3036] young man in a check suit came in and sat at a table close by.
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3100] A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O'Connell Bridge
[Counterparts] [3108] lost his reputation as a strong man, having been defeated twice by
[Counterparts] [3125] "Who is that?" said the man, peering through the darkness.
[Counterparts] [3144] The man sat down heavily on one of the chairs while the little boy
[Counterparts] [3153] The man jumped up furiously and pointed to the fire.
[Counterparts] [3165] but the man followed him and caught him by the coat. The little
[Counterparts] [3169] "Now, you'll let the fire out the next time!" said the man striking at
[Clay] [3250] ring or man either; and when she laughed her grey-green eyes
[A Painful Case] [3474] a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often
[A Painful Case] [3611] between man and man is impossible because there must not be
[A Painful Case] [3612] sexual intercourse and friendship between man and woman is
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3823] Mr. O'Connor, a grey-haired young man, whose face was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3838] "I'll get you a match," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3863] lapel of his coat. The old man watched him attentively and then,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3874] "Only I'm an old man now I'd change his tune for him. I'd take the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3888] "Nineteen," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3896] Mr. O'Connor shook his head in sympathy, and the old man fell
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3902] "Who's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3911] He was a tall, slender young man with a light brown moustache.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3917] Mr. O'Connor shook his head. The old man left the hearth and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3940] man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3942] The old man returned to his seat by the fire, saying:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3948] "Colgan," said the old man scornfully.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3952] Hasn't the working-man as good a right to be in the Corporation as
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3959] "One man is a plain honest man with no hunker-sliding about him.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3964] old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3966] "The working-man," said Mr. Hynes, "gets all kicks and no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3969] working-man is not going to drag the honour of Dublin in the mud
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3972] "How's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3978] "Our man won't vote for the address," said Mr. O'Connor. "He goes
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3987] The three men fell silent. The old man began to rake more cinders
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3992] "If this man was alive," he said, pointing to the leaf, "we'd have no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3997] "Musha, God be with them times!" said the old man. "There was
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4000] The room was silent again. Then a bustling little man with a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4007] "Sit down here, Mr. Henchy," said the old man, offering him his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4013] the old man vacated.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4040] The old man went out of the room.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4052] pay up like a man instead of: 'O, now, Mr. Henchy, I must speak to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4065] The old man returned with a few lumps of coal which he placed
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4081] man said anything, but, just as the door was closing, Mr. O'Connor,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4099] man from the other camp. He's a spy of Colgan's, if you ask me.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4105] "His father was a decent, respectable man," Mr. Henchy admitted.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4113] the old man. "Let him work for his own side and not come spying
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4126] "There's no knowing," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4205] unfortunate man of some kind...."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4219] "I'm dry too," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4257] "Faith, Mr. Henchy," said the old man, "you'd keep up better style
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4275] "What is it?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4280] The old man helped the boy to transfer the bottles from the basket
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4286] "What bottles?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4292] "Come back tomorrow," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4304] "There's no tumblers," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4307] good man before now drank out of the bottle."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4314] The boy came back with the corkscrew. The old man opened three
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4322] The old man opened another bottle grudgingly, and handed it to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4329] As the old man said nothing further, the boy took the bottle. said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4335] "That's the way it begins," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4339] The old man distributed the three bottles which he had opened and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4355] Here two men entered the room. One of them was a very fat man
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4359] other man, who was much younger and frailer, had a thin,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4363] "Hello, Crofton!" said Mr. Henchy to the fat man. "Talk of the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4366] "Where did the boose come from?" asked the young man. "Did the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4380] "How can I?" said the old man, "when there's no corkscrew? "
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4400] Conservatives had withdrawn their man and, choosing the lesser of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4416] 'He's a respectable man,' said I. 'He's in favour of whatever will
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4440] him out of it till the man was grey. He's a man of the world, and he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4452] "Let bygones be bygones," said Mr. Henchy. "I admire the man
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4465] he did Parnell was a fit man to lead us? And why, then, would we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4479] only man that could keep that bag of cats in order. 'Down, ye dogs!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4490] The old man handed him another bottle and he placed it on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4503] him like a man!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4518] "Out with it, man!" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4590] "Good man, Joe!" said Mr. O'Connor, taking out his cigarette
[A Mother] [4624] of married life, Mrs. Kearney perceived that such a man would
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4654] crossing of so man hands, and said good-bye to one another in
[A Mother] [4707] hand. He was a little man, with a white, vacant face. She noticed
[A Mother] [4823] already come. The bass, Mr. Duggan, was a slender young man
[A Mother] [4836] Bell, the second tenor, was a fair-haired little man who competed
[A Mother] [4907] Miss Healy and the baritone. They were the Freeman man and Mr.
[A Mother] [4908] O'Madden Burke. The Freeman man had come in to say that he
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4939] by instinct. He was a suave, elderly man who balanced his
[A Mother] [4945] While Mr. Holohan was entertaining the Freeman man Mrs.
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[Grace] [5151] man was or where had his friends gone. The door of the bar
[Grace] [5157] a young man with thick immobile features, listened. He moved his
[Grace] [5164] "Who is the man? What's his name and address?"
[Grace] [5166] A young man in a cycling-suit cleared his way through the ring of
[Grace] [5167] bystanders. He knelt down promptly beside the injured man and
[Grace] [5169] man washed the blood from the injured man's mouth and then
[Grace] [5176] "You're all right now?" asked the young man in the cycling- suit.
[Grace] [5178] "Sha,'s nothing," said the injured man, trying to stand up.
[Grace] [5186] The man, without answering, began to twirl the ends of his
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5197] "Hallo, Tom, old man! What's the trouble?"
[Grace] [5199] "Sha,'s nothing," said the man.
[Grace] [5213] The young man in the cycling-suit took the man by the other arm
[Grace] [5218] "The gentleman fell down the stairs," said the young man.
[Grace] [5220] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir," said the injured man.
[Grace] [5236] an outsider. The injured man said again as well as he could.
[Grace] [5243] "Don't mention it," said the young man.
[Grace] [5247] his gratitude to the young man and regretted that they could not
[Grace] [5250] "Another time," said the young man.
[Grace] [5279] grace of these two articles of clothing, he said, a man could always
[Grace] [5292] Mr. Power, a much younger man, was employed in the Royal Irish
[Grace] [5298] debts were a byword in his circle; he was a debonair young man.
[Grace] [5337] a new leaf. I'll talk to Martin. He's the man. We'll come here one of
[Grace] [5349] "We'll make a new man of him," he said. "Good-night, Mrs.
[Grace] [5369] well-fed man, who was dressed smartly in a frock-coat and
[Grace] [5409] Mr. Cunningham was the very man for such a case. He was an
[Grace] [5417] thoroughly sensible man, influential and intelligent. His blade of
[Grace] [5430] man of her husband's age would not change greatly before death.
[Grace] [5434] being shortened. However, Mr. Cunningham was a capable man;
[Grace] [5443] that he had once known a similar case. A man of seventy had
[Grace] [5486] "I'm very much obliged to you, old man," said the invalid.
[Grace] [5762] "Fine, jolly fellow! He's a man of the world like ourselves."
[Grace] [5766] "That's the man."
[Grace] [5791] "Ah!... he was a splendid man," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5859] "I wouldn't doubt you, old man. Open that, Jack, will you?"
[Grace] [5904] "There was many a good man went to the penny-a-week school
[Grace] [5938] course, not our present man, or his predecessor, but some of the
[Grace] [5994] "John of Tuam," repeated Mr. Cunningham, "was the man."
[Grace] [6048] "Well, Mrs. Kernan, we're going to make your man here a good
[Grace] [6190] no extravagant purpose; but as a man of the world speaking to his
[Grace] [6208] the truth, to be frank and say like a man:
[The Dead] [6316] wedding one of these fine days with your young man, eh? "
[The Dead] [6328] He was a stout, tallish young man. The high colour of his cheeks
[The Dead] [6496] A tall wizen-faced man, with a stiff grizzled moustache and
[The Dead] [6505] "I'm the man for the ladies," said Mr. Browne, pursing his lips until
[The Dead] [6594] Malins across the landing. The latter, a young man of about forty,
[The Dead] [6674] man-o-war suit, lay at her feet. It was she who had chosen the
[The Dead] [6883] day he caught a beautiful big fish and the man in the hotel cooked
[The Dead] [7155] Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor, a dark- complexioned young man
[The Dead] [7786] in the cold, looking in through a grated window at a man making
[The Dead] [7789] the man at the furnace:
[The Dead] [7793] But the man could not hear with the noise of the furnace. It was
[The Dead] [7834] "I see a white man this time," said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7845] man a shilling over his fare. The man saluted and said:
[The Dead] [7864] An old man was dozing in a great hooded chair in the hall. He lit a
[The Dead] [7889] that handsome article, like a good man."
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how
[The Dead] [8160] man and wife. His curious eyes rested long upon her face and on
[The Dead] [8197] partial darkness he imagined he saw the form of a young man