Dubliners by James Joyce
me

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 182 occurrences of the word:   me

[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [14] the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some
[The Sisters] [15] maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed
[The Sisters] [35] uncle saw me staring and said to me:
[The Sisters] [48] news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [56] black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [76] "No, no, not for me," said old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [95] face still followed me. It murmured, and I understood that it
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [119] The reading of the card persuaded me that he was dead and I was
[The Sisters] [123] great-coat. Perhaps my aunt would have given me a packet of High
[The Sisters] [143] before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish
[The Sisters] [144] college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin
[The Sisters] [145] properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about
[The Sisters] [146] Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of
[The Sisters] [149] difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain
[The Sisters] [151] or only imperfections. His questions showed me how complex and
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [157] surprised when he told me that the fathers of the Church had
[The Sisters] [163] put me through the responses of the Mass which he had made me
[The Sisters] [168] which had made me feel uneasy in the beginning of our
[The Sisters] [178] In the evening my aunt took me with her to visit the house of
[The Sisters] [189] to beckon to me again repeatedly with her hand.
[The Sisters] [196] mutterings distracted me. I noticed how clumsily her skirt was
[The Sisters] [198] trodden down all to one side. The fancy came to me that the old
[The Sisters] [214] sherry into the glasses and passed them to us. She pressed me to
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [293] beef-tea any me, nor you, ma'am, sending him his snuff. Ah, poor
[The Sisters] [308] again where we were all born down in Irishtown and take me and
[An Encounter] [412] you read instead of studying your Roman History? Let me not find
[An Encounter] [420] glory of the Wild West for me and the confused puffy face of Leo
[An Encounter] [424] disorder alone seemed to offer me. The mimic warfare of the
[An Encounter] [425] evening became at last as wearisome to me as the routine of school
[An Encounter] [464] clambered up beside me on the bridge. While we were waiting he
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [508] had been scantily dosed to me at school gradually taking substance
[An Encounter] [585] which agitated and pained me because I was afraid the man would
[An Encounter] [589] mentioned lightly that he had three totties. The man asked me how
[An Encounter] [590] many I had. I answered that I had none. He did not believe me and
[An Encounter] [601] His attitude on this point struck me as strangely liberal in a man of
[An Encounter] [611] gave me the impression that he was repeating something which he
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [660] so I met the gaze of a pair of bottle-green eyes peering at me from
[An Encounter] [670] He described to me how he would whip such a boy as if he were
[An Encounter] [672] better than anything in this world; and his voice, as he led me
[An Encounter] [674] seemed to plead with me that I should understand him.
[An Encounter] [680] my heart was beating quickly with fear that he would seize me by
[An Encounter] [688] Mahony saw me and hallooed in answer. How my heart beat as he
[An Encounter] [689] came running across the field to me! He ran as if to bring me aid.
[Araby] [749] Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Araby] [778] At last she spoke to me. When she addressed the first words to me
[Araby] [780] me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It
[Araby] [789] of the spikes, bowing her head towards me. The light from the
[Araby] [803] me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby
[Araby] [804] were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [811] serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my
[Araby] [812] desire, seemed to me child's play, ugly monotonous child's play.
[Araby] [816] for the hat-brush, and answered me curtly:
[Araby] [823] misgave me.
[Araby] [827] its ticking began to irritate me, I left the room. I mounted the
[Araby] [829] empty gloomy rooms liberated me and I went from room to room
[Araby] [831] below in the street. Their cries reached me weakened and
[Araby] [854] When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me
[Araby] [866] dull boy." He asked me where I was going and, when I had told
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Araby] [873] buyers and glaring with gas recalled to me the purpose of my
[Araby] [883] of me was a large building which displayed the magical name.
[Araby] [915] Observing me the young lady came over and asked me did I wish
[Araby] [917] seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty. I looked
[Araby] [925] subject. Once or twice the young lady glanced at me over her
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1423] brought her into a field there. She told me she used to go with a
[Two Gallants] [1424] dairyman.... It was fine, man. Cigarettes every night she'd bring me
[Two Gallants] [1425] and paying the tram out and back. And one night she brought me
[Two Gallants] [1470] "Well... tell me, Corley, I suppose you'll be able to pull it off all
[Two Gallants] [1479] man. She's a bit gone on me."
[Two Gallants] [1523] "There was others at her before me," said Corley philosophically.
[Two Gallants] [1528] "You know you can't kid me, Corley," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1530] "Honest to God!" said Corley. "Didn't she tell me herself?"
[Two Gallants] [1550] "But tell me," said Lenehan again, "are you sure you can bring it
[Two Gallants] [1558] "I'll pull it off," he said. "Leave it to me, can't you?"
[Two Gallants] [1595] "Are you trying to get inside me?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1694] "Bring me a plate of peas," he said, "and a bottle of ginger beer."
[A Little Cloud] [2260] signs of aging in me--eh, what? A little grey and thin on the top--
[A Little Cloud] [2310] very same serious person that used to lecture me on Sunday
[A Little Cloud] [2360] from Ireland they were ready to eat me, man."
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2427] nature.... But tell me something about yourself. Hogan told me you
[A Little Cloud] [2554] have a good fat account at the bank or she won't do for me."
[Counterparts] [2751] another for shirking work. Let me tell you that if the contract is not
[Counterparts] [2753] Do you hear me now?"
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2761] mind me now?"
[Counterparts] [2902] Alleyne. "Tell me," he added, glancing first for approval to the
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2921] work of you! Wait till you see! You'll apologise to me for your
[Counterparts] [2923] telling you, or you'll apologise to me!"
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [3127] "Me, pa."
[Counterparts] [3137] "That's right.... Did she think of leaving any dinner for me?"
[Counterparts] [3176] "O, pa!" he cried. "Don't beat me, pa! And I'll... I'll say a Hail Mary
[Counterparts] [3177] for you.... I'll say a Hail Mary for you, pa, if you don't beat me....
[Clay] [3424] But I also dreamt, which pleased me most,
[Clay] [3425] That you loved me still the same.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3882] it, only impudence. He takes th'upper hand of me whenever he sees
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4031] "He asked me who the nominators were; and I told him. I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4055] hand-me-down shop in Mary's Lane."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4089] "Tell me," he said across the fire, "what brings our friend in here?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4099] man from the other camp. He's a spy of Colgan's, if you ask me.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4112] "He doesn't get a warm welcome from me when he comes," said
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4165] velvety voice. "Don't let me disturb you now! I'm just looking for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4191] "Tell me, John," said Mr. O'Connor, lighting his cigarette with
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4198] "Ask me an easier one," said Mr. Henchy.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4200] "Fanning and himself seem to me very thick. They're often in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4214] account.... God forgive me," he added, "I thought he was the dozen
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4249] vermin, with Jack here standing up behind me in a powdered wig
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4252] "And make me your private secretary, John."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4262] me? Now, I declare to God I didn't believe him."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4427] "Listen to me," said Mr. Henchy. "What we want in thus country,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4441] means well by us. He's a jolly fine decent fellow, if you ask me,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4453] personally. He's just an ordinary knockabout like you and me. He's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[A Mother] [5063] "And what way did you treat me?" asked Mrs. Kearney.
[Grace] [5319] "O, you needn't tell me that, Mr. Power. I know you're a friend of
[Grace] [5620] "And have you nothing for me, duckie?"
[Grace] [5691] "D'ye know what, Tom, has just occurred to me? You night join in
[Grace] [5768] "And tell me, Martin.... Is he a good preacher?"
[Grace] [5803] remember Crofton saying to me when we came out----"
[Grace] [5811] said, but our belief is the same. Struck me as very well put."
[Grace] [5881] "Allow me," said Mr. Cunningham positively, "it was Lux upon
[Grace] [5937] "Tell me, Martin," he said. "Weren't some of the popes--of
[Grace] [6073] "Get behind me, Satan!" said Mr. Fogarty, laughing and looking at
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6391] "Gretta tells me you're not going to take a cab back to Monkstown
[The Dead] [6414] never guess what he makes me wear now!"
[The Dead] [6422] underfoot I must put on my galoshes. Tonight even, he wanted me
[The Dead] [6423] to put them on, but I wouldn't. The next thing he'll buy me will be
[The Dead] [6434] "Goloshes, Julia!" exclaimed her sister "Goodness me, don't you
[The Dead] [6449] "But tell me, Gabriel," said Aunt Kate, with brisk tact. "Of course,
[The Dead] [6507] Miss Morkan, the reason they are so fond of me is----"
[The Dead] [6527] "God help me," he said, smiling, "it's the doctor's orders."
[The Dead] [6541] to have said: 'Now, Mary Grimes, if I don't take it, make me take it,
[The Dead] [6706] "With me?" said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6864] "There was no row," said Gabriel moodily, "only she wanted me to
[The Dead] [6916] generation that is growing up around us seems to me to lack." Very
[The Dead] [6976] me."
[The Dead] [7041] let me run off now."
[The Dead] [7049] "If you will allow me, Miss Ivors, I'll see you home if you are
[The Dead] [7055] suppers and don't mind me. I'm quite well able to take care of
[The Dead] [7185] of how one night an Italian tenor had sung five encores to Let me
[The Dead] [7208] "For me," said Aunt Kate, who had been picking a bone, "there
[The Dead] [7209] was only one tenor. To please me, I mean. But I suppose none of
[The Dead] [7221] hearing of old Parkinson but he's too far back for me."
[The Dead] [7321] will for the deed and to lend me your attention for a few moments
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7482] goodness he didn't hear me."
[The Dead] [7512] "It makes me feel cold to look at you two gentlemen muffled up
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7932] Gabriel in a false voice. "He gave me back that sovereign I lent
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [8084] "I think he died for me," she answered.
[The Dead] [8105] "Poor fellow," she said. "He was very fond of me and he was such
[The Dead] [8113] "And then when it came to the time for me to leave Galway and