Dubliners by James Joyce
mean

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 22 occurrences of the word:   mean

[The Sisters] [63] "How do you mean, Mr. Cotter?" asked my aunt.
[The Sisters] [65] "What I mean is," said old Cotter, "it's bad for children. My idea is:
[The Sisters] [336] course, they say it was all right, that it contained nothing, I mean.
[The Boarding House] [1958] Catholic wine-merchant's office and publicity would mean for
[A Little Cloud] [2382] insistence--"I mean, compared with London or Dublin?"
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2564] When I go about a thing I mean business, I tell you. You just wait."
[A Little Cloud] [2616] pretty. But he found something mean in it. Why was it so
[A Little Cloud] [2625] the room. He found something mean in the pretty furniture which
[Counterparts] [3141] "Light the lamp. What do you mean by having the place in
[A Painful Case] [3439] because he found all the other suburbs of Dublin mean, modern
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4044] going on properly I won't forget you, you may be sure.' Mean little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4053] Mr. Fanning.... I've spent a lot of money'? Mean little schoolboy of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4463] "What I mean," said Mr. Lyons, "is we have our ideals. Why, now,
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[Grace] [5704] length. "They're an educated order. I believe they mean well, too."
[Grace] [5871] said Mr. Power. "I mean, apart from his being Pope."
[The Dead] [7209] was only one tenor. To please me, I mean. But I suppose none of
[The Dead] [7249] "And do you mean to say," asked Mr. Browne incredulously, "that
[The Dead] [7568] on, sir! What do you mean, sir? Johnny! Johnny! Most
[The Dead] [7676] "O, Mr. D'Arcy," cried Mary Jane, "it's downright mean of you to