Dubliners by James Joyce
much

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 47 occurrences of the word:   much

[The Sisters] [60] "I wouldn't like children of mine," he said, "to have too much to
[The Sisters] [126] black snuff-box for his hands trembled too much to allow him to
[The Sisters] [216] would make too much noise eating them. She seemed to be
[The Sisters] [323] priesthood was too much for him. And then his life was, you might
[An Encounter] [419] This rebuke during the sober hours of school paled much of the
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [609] There was nothing he liked, he said, so much as looking at a nice
[Eveline] [1012] much more, for he was usually fairly bad on Saturday night. In the
[After the Race] [1177] Cambridge that he had met Segouin. They were not much more
[After the Race] [1179] society of one who had seen so much of the world and was reputed
[After the Race] [1212] much more so now when he was about to stake the greater part of
[After the Race] [1295] squeezing themselves together amid much laughter. They drove by
[After the Race] [1346] of course. How much had he written away? The men rose to their
[Two Gallants] [1690] "How much is a plate of peas?" he asked.
[The Boarding House] [1954] Bantam Lyons her task would have been much harder. She did not
[A Little Cloud] [2280] Little Chandler allowed his whisky to be very much diluted.
[Counterparts] [3033] Weathers came back. Much to Farrington's relief he drank a glass
[Counterparts] [3044] very often and with much grace; and when, after a little time, she
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3309] she reflected how much more polite he was than the young men
[Clay] [3350] manager. Maria did not understand why Joe laughed so much over
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3412] prelude and said "Now, Maria!" and Maria, blushing very much
[Clay] [3429] her song Joe was very much moved. He said that there was no time
[Clay] [3431] whatever other people might say; and his eyes filled up so much
[A Painful Case] [3590] Mr. Duffy was very much surprised. Her interpretation of his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4260] haven't much entertaining now,' says I. 'Entertaining!' says he. 'He'd
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4359] other man, who was much younger and frailer, had a thin,
[A Mother] [4613] manners were much admired. She sat amid the chilly circle of her
[A Mother] [4622] He was much older than she. His conversation, which was serious,
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4929] "Thank you very much, Mr. Hendrick," said Mr. Holohan. you'll
[Grace] [5292] Mr. Power, a much younger man, was employed in the Royal Irish
[Grace] [5466] "Pain? Not much," answered Mr. Kernan. "But it's so sickening. I
[Grace] [5486] "I'm very much obliged to you, old man," said the invalid.
[Grace] [5783] "And yet they say he wasn't much of a theologian," said Mr
[Grace] [5817] "There's not much difference between us," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[The Dead] [6247] go about much, gave music lessons to beginners on the old square
[The Dead] [6898] top of the Wellington Monument. How much more pleasant it
[The Dead] [6944] his voice proved too much for him.
[The Dead] [7040] "Ever so much, I assure you," said Miss Ivors, "but you really must
[The Dead] [7274] "I like that idea very much but wouldn't a comfortable spring bed
[The Dead] [7336] no tradition which does it so much honour and which it should
[The Dead] [7745] "Good-night, Aunt Kate, and thanks ever so much. Goodnight,
[The Dead] [8114] come up to the convent he was much worse and I wouldn't be let