Dubliners by James Joyce
order

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 16 occurrences of the word:   order

[Two Gallants] [1696] He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility for his entry
[Counterparts] [2772] might give him an order on the cashier. He stood still, gazing
[Counterparts] [2937] out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew. He
[Counterparts] [3162] order to give his arm free play.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4479] only man that could keep that bag of cats in order. 'Down, ye dogs!
[A Mother] [5106] up and down the room, in order to cool himself for he his skin on
[Grace] [5170] called for some brandy. The constable repeated the order in an
[Grace] [5388] order.
[Grace] [5704] length. "They're an educated order. I believe they mean well, too."
[Grace] [5706] "They're the grandest order in the Church, Tom," said Mr.
[Grace] [5717] Order. Every other order of the Church had to be reformed at some
[Grace] [5718] time or other but the Jesuit Order was never once reformed. It
[The Dead] [7264] "That's the rule of the order," said Aunt Kate firmly.
[The Dead] [7537] gentleman's mill, walking round and round in order to drive the
[The Dead] [7898] the street in order that his emotion might calm a little. Then he