Dubliners by James Joyce
put

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 53 occurrences of the word:   put

[The Sisters] [78] My aunt brought the dish from the safe and put it on the table.
[The Sisters] [163] put me through the responses of the Mass which he had made me
[The Sisters] [319] she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate
[Araby] [849] "I'm afraid you may put off your bazaar for this night of Our Lord."
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[The Boarding House] [1838] day long he sat in the bailiff's room, waiting to be put on a job.
[The Boarding House] [1961] suspected he had a bit of stuff put by.
[The Boarding House] [2012] She would put an end to herself, she said.
[The Boarding House] [2048] He stood up to put on his coat and waistcoat, more helpless than
[The Boarding House] [2072] that sort of a game on with his sister he'd bloody well put his teeth
[A Little Cloud] [2230] that, he would put in allusions. He began to invent sentences and
[A Little Cloud] [2270] denial. Ignatius Galaher put on his hat again.
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2544] "You'll put your head in the sack," repeated Little Chandler stoutly,
[A Little Cloud] [2587] two pounds of sugar. She put the sleeping child deftly in his arms
[Counterparts] [2805] man pulled a shepherd's plaid cap out of his pocket, put it on his
[Counterparts] [2816] a gulp and asked for a caraway seed. He put his penny on the
[Counterparts] [2859] knee. The man put the correspondence on the desk and bowed
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [3072] "You're not to put the weight of your body behind it. Play fair," he
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3377] such good spirits. The next-door girls put some saucers on the
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[A Painful Case] [3620] One evening as he was about to put a morsel of corned beef and
[A Painful Case] [3743] was now attacking his nerves. He put on his overcoat and hat
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3835] Mr. O'Connor put his cigarette into his mouth and began search his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3890] "Why don't you put him to something?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4096] nearly put out the fire, which uttered a hissing protest.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4187] Mr. Henchy returned with the candlestick and put it on the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4272] At this point there was a knock at the door, and a boy put in his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4281] to the table and counted the full tally. After the transfer the boy put
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4331] put the bottle back on the table and wiped his mouth with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4386] put them on the hob. Then he sat dow-n again by the fire and took
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4487] there's no corkscrew! Here, show me one here and I'll put it at the
[A Mother] [4625] wear better than a romantic person, but she never put her own
[A Mother] [4631] troubled him, she put the eider-down quilt over his feet and made a
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [5058] hand or a foot she won't put on that platform."
[Grace] [5301] Kernan was helped into the house. His wife put him to bed while
[Grace] [5439] was bounded by her kitchen, but, if she was put to it, she could
[Grace] [5560] mutually honourable and resented any affront put upon him by
[Grace] [5811] said, but our belief is the same. Struck me as very well put."
[The Dead] [6422] underfoot I must put on my galoshes. Tonight even, he wanted me
[The Dead] [6423] to put them on, but I wouldn't. The next thing he'll buy me will be
[The Dead] [6993] choirs that have slaved there all their lives and put little
[The Dead] [7026] Miss Ivors, who had put on her hat and was buttoning her cloak,
[The Dead] [7216] was ever put into a man's throat."
[The Dead] [7250] a chap can go down there and put up there as if it were a hotel and
[The Dead] [7546] Johnny and put on his very best tall hat and his very best stock
[The Dead] [7688] He went into the pantry hastily and put on his overcoat. The others,
[The Dead] [7961] quaintness of her phrase, put his hands on her hair and began