Dubliners by James Joyce
read

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

This is a hypertextual, self-referential edition of
Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

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There are 22 occurrences of the word:   read

[The Sisters] [112] on the crape. I also approached and read:
[An Encounter] [412] you read instead of studying your Roman History? Let me not find
[An Encounter] [573] we had read the poetry of Thomas Moore or the works of Sir
[An Encounter] [574] Walter Scott and Lord Lytton. I pretended that I had read every
[An Encounter] [584] read." Mahony asked why couldn't boys read them--a question
[Araby] [803] me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby
[Eveline] [1060] been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made
[Two Gallants] [1768] delight and keeping close to his lamp-post tried to read the result
[A Little Cloud] [2142] down from the bookshelf and read out something to his wife. But
[A Little Cloud] [2636] began to read the first poem in the book:
[A Little Cloud] [2655] faster while his eyes began to read the second stanza:
[A Little Cloud] [2661] It was useless. He couldn't read. He couldn't do anything. The
[Clay] [3209] eight. She took out her purse with the silver clasps and read again
[A Painful Case] [3610] months after his last interview with Mrs. Sinico, read: Love
[A Painful Case] [3617] having dined moderately in George's Street and read the evening
[A Painful Case] [3624] on his plate and read the paragraph attentively. Then he drank a
[A Painful Case] [3626] down before him between his elbows and read the paragraph over
[A Painful Case] [3640] read the paragraph again by the failing light of the window. He
[A Painful Case] [3641] read it not aloud, but moving his lips as a priest does when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3842] He selected one of the cards and read what was printed on it:
[The Dead] [7699] years; and I read this morning in the newspapers that the snow is