Dubliners by James Joyce
see

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 82 occurrences of the word:   see

[The Sisters] [7] dead, I thought, I would see the reflection of candles on the
[The Sisters] [84] impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it
[The Sisters] [260] poor as we are--we wouldn't see him want anything while he was
[The Sisters] [307] over he'd go out for a drive one fine day just to see the old house
[The Sisters] [326] "Yes," said my aunt. "He was a disappointed man. You could see
[The Sisters] [348] couldn't see a sight of him anywhere. So then the clerk suggested
[An Encounter] [437] to the ships, then to cross in the ferryboat and walk out to see the
[An Encounter] [520] foreign sailors to see had any of them green eyes for I had some
[An Encounter] [538] see the Dodder.
[An Encounter] [577] "Ah, I can see you are a bookworm like myself. Now," he added,
[Araby] [731] down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Eveline] [967] would never see again those familiar objects from which she had
[Eveline] [988] "Miss Hill, don't you see these ladies are waiting?"
[Eveline] [1018] work to keep the house together and to see that the two young
[Eveline] [1033] every evening and see her home. He took her to see The Bohemian
[After the Race] [1174] circles. Then he had been sent for a term to Cambridge to see a
[Two Gallants] [1750] expected to see Corley and the young woman return.
[Two Gallants] [1789] house which the young woman had entered to see that he was not
[Two Gallants] [1795] Corley turned his head to see who had called him, and then
[Two Gallants] [1802] could see nothing there.
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[A Little Cloud] [2221] verse. He felt them within him. He tried weigh his soul to see if it
[A Little Cloud] [2259] saw you last? Dear God, how old we're getting! Do you see any
[A Little Cloud] [2309] "Tommy," he said, "I see you haven't changed an atom. You're the
[A Little Cloud] [2473] "I'm awfully sorry, old man. You see I'm over here with another
[A Little Cloud] [2534] and see a bit of life and the world before I put my head in the sack
[A Little Cloud] [2563] You wait a while my boy. See if I don't play my cards properly.
[A Little Cloud] [2604] parcel to see if it was securely tied. When he brought the blouse
[Counterparts] [2781] "I was waiting to see..."
[Counterparts] [2783] "Very good, you needn't wait to see. Go downstairs and do your
[Counterparts] [2921] work of you! Wait till you see! You'll apologise to me for your
[Counterparts] [2929] He stood in a doorway opposite the office watching to see if the
[Clay] [3184] kitchen was spick and span: the cook said you could see yourself
[Clay] [3187] barmbracks seemed uncut; but if you went closer you would see
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3981] "Won't he?" said Mr. Hynes. "Wait till you see whether he will or
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4043] shoeboy, but he said: 'Oh, now, Mr. Henchy, when I see work
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4078] off for the present. See you later. 'Bye, 'bye."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4181] "No, no, I can see.... Thank you, indeed."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4383] you ever see this little trick?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4443] one never went to see these wild Irish. By Christ, I'll go myself and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[A Mother] [4676] Holohan called to see her every day to have her advice on some
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4805] to whom Mrs. Kearney explained that she wanted to see one of the
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4927] Holohan, "and I'll see it in."
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[Grace] [5204] "It's all right, constable. I'll see him home."
[Grace] [5263] Kernan's mouth but he could not see. He struck a match and,
[Grace] [5390] Two nights after, his friends came to see him. She brought them up
[Grace] [5431] She was tempted to see a curious appropriateness in his accident
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5653] There was a short silence. Mr. Kernan waited to see whether he
[Grace] [5678] "You see, we may as well all admit we're a nice collection of
[Grace] [5928] "O, of course," said Mr. Power, "great minds can see things."
[Grace] [6195] spiritual life, and see if they tallied accurately with conscience.
[The Dead] [6260] worlds that any of Mary Jane's pupils should see him under the
[The Dead] [6483] "Slip down, Gabriel, like a good fellow and see if he's all right, and
[The Dead] [6540] "Well, you see, I'm like the famous Mrs. Cassidy, who is reported
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6869] "O, do go, Gabriel," she cried. "I'd love to see Galway again."
[The Dead] [6910] not be sorry to see him fail in his speech. An idea came into his
[The Dead] [7049] "If you will allow me, Miss Ivors, I'll see you home if you are
[The Dead] [7623] near the top of the first flight, in the shadow also. He could not see
[The Dead] [7624] her face but he could see the terra-cotta and salmon-pink panels of
[The Dead] [7685] "Can't you see that I'm as hoarse as a crow?" said Mr. D'Arcy
[The Dead] [7748] "O, good-night, Gretta, I didn't see you."
[The Dead] [7834] "I see a white man this time," said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [7940] brutal. No, he must see some ardour in her eyes first. He longed to
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8046] "How do I know? To see him, perhaps."
[The Dead] [8068] lest she might see the shame that burned upon his forehead.
[The Dead] [8115] see him so I wrote him a letter saying I was going up to Dublin and
[The Dead] [8124] window. The window was so wet I couldn't see, so I ran downstairs
[The Dead] [8131] his death in the rain. But he said he did not want to live. I can see