Dubliners by James Joyce
she

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 695 occurrences of the word:   she

[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [186] At the first landing she stopped and beckoned us forward
[The Sisters] [212] wine-glasses. She set these on the table and invited us to take a
[The Sisters] [213] little glass of wine. Then, at her sister's bidding, she filled out the
[The Sisters] [214] sherry into the glasses and passed them to us. She pressed me to
[The Sisters] [216] would make too much noise eating them. She seemed to be
[The Sisters] [218] sofa where she sat down behind her sister. No one spoke: we all
[The Sisters] [228] "Did he... peacefully?" she asked.
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [251] She sipped a little more from her glass and said:
[The Sisters] [259] "Ah, poor James!" she said. "God knows we done all we could, as
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [279] "Ah, there's no friends like the old friends," she said, "when all is
[The Sisters] [296] She stopped, as if she were communing with the past and then said
[The Sisters] [304] She laid a finger against her nose and frowned: then she continued:
[The Sisters] [319] she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate
[The Sisters] [322] "He was too scrupulous always," she said. "The duties of the
[The Sisters] [333] and after a long pause she said slowly:
[The Sisters] [344] "That affected his mind," she said. "After that he began to mope by
[The Sisters] [355] She stopped suddenly as if to listen. I too listened; but there was
[An Encounter] [517] observed from the other quay. Some bystander said that she was a
[An Encounter] [645] wall she had escaladed. Desisting from this, he began to wander
[Araby] [731] down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [733] Mangan's steps resignedly. She was waiting for us, her figure
[Araby] [736] her. Her dress swung as she moved her body and the soft rope of
[Araby] [741] that I could not be seen. When she came out on the doorstep my
[Araby] [778] At last she spoke to me. When she addressed the first words to me
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Araby] [781] would be a splendid bazaar, she said she would love to go.
[Araby] [785] While she spoke she turned a silver bracelet round and round her
[Araby] [786] wrist. She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat
[Araby] [788] fighting for their caps and I was alone at the railings. She held one
[Araby] [793] border of a petticoat, just visible as she stood at ease.
[Araby] [795] "It's well for you," she said.
[Araby] [833] over at the dark house where she lived. I may have stood there for
[Araby] [840] fire. She was an old garrulous woman, a pawnbroker's widow, who
[Araby] [843] and still my uncle did not come. Mrs. Mercer stood up to go: she
[Araby] [844] was sorry she couldn't wait any longer, but it was after eight
[Araby] [845] o'clock and she did not like to be out late as the night air was bad
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [909] "Didn't she say that?"
[Araby] [916] to buy anything. The tone of her voice was not encouraging; she
[Eveline] [940] SHE sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue.
[Eveline] [942] nostrils was the odour of dusty cretonne. She was tired.
[Eveline] [945] way home; she heard his footsteps clacking along the concrete
[Eveline] [952] --the Devines, the Waters, the Dunns, little Keogh the cripple, she
[Eveline] [958] besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and
[Eveline] [961] England. Everything changes. Now she was going to go away like
[Eveline] [964] Home! She looked round the room, reviewing all its familiar
[Eveline] [965] objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years,
[Eveline] [966] wondering where on earth all the dust came from. Perhaps she
[Eveline] [967] would never see again those familiar objects from which she had
[Eveline] [968] never dreamed of being divided. And yet during all those years she
[Eveline] [978] She had consented to go away, to leave her home. Was that wise?
[Eveline] [979] She tried to weigh each side of the question. In her home anyway
[Eveline] [980] she had shelter and food; she had those whom she had known all
[Eveline] [981] her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the
[Eveline] [983] when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she
[Eveline] [985] advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an
[Eveline] [992] She would not cry many tears at leaving the Stores.
[Eveline] [995] be like that. Then she would be married--she, Eveline. People
[Eveline] [996] would treat her with respect then. She would not be treated as her
[Eveline] [997] mother had been. Even now, though she was over nineteen, she
[Eveline] [998] sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1007] weary her unspeakably. She always gave her entire wages--seven
[Eveline] [1009] was to get any money from her father. He said she used to
[Eveline] [1010] squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to
[Eveline] [1013] end he would give her the money and ask her had she any intention
[Eveline] [1014] of buying Sunday's dinner. Then she had to rush out as quickly as
[Eveline] [1015] she could and do her marketing, holding her black leather purse
[Eveline] [1016] tightly in her hand as she elbowed her way through the crowds and
[Eveline] [1017] returning home late under her load of provisions. She had hard
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1024] She was about to explore another life with Frank. Frank was very
[Eveline] [1025] kind, manly, open-hearted. She was to go away with him by the
[Eveline] [1027] where he had a home waiting for her. How well she remembered
[Eveline] [1028] the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the
[Eveline] [1029] main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He
[Eveline] [1034] Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the
[Eveline] [1037] lass that loves a sailor, she always felt pleasantly confused. He
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1052] One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to
[Eveline] [1057] father. Ernest had been her favourite but she liked Harry too. Her
[Eveline] [1058] father was becoming old lately, she noticed; he would miss her.
[Eveline] [1059] Sometimes he could be very nice. Not long before, when she had
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[Eveline] [1066] Her time was running out but she continued to sit by the window,
[Eveline] [1068] dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street
[Eveline] [1069] organ playing. She knew the air Strange that it should come that
[Eveline] [1071] to keep the home together as long as she could. She remembered
[Eveline] [1072] the last night of her mother's illness; she was again in the close
[Eveline] [1073] dark room at the other side of the hall and outside she heard a
[Eveline] [1075] away and given sixpence. She remembered her father strutting
[Eveline] [1080] As she mused the pitiful vision of her mother's life laid its spell on
[Eveline] [1082] closing in final craziness. She trembled as she heard again her
[Eveline] [1087] She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must
[Eveline] [1089] love, too. But she wanted to live. Why should she be unhappy? She
[Eveline] [1093] She stood among the swaying crowd in the station at the North
[Eveline] [1094] Wall. He held her hand and she knew that he was speaking to her,
[Eveline] [1097] doors of the sheds she caught a glimpse of the black mass of the
[Eveline] [1098] boat, lying in beside the quay wall, with illumined portholes. She
[Eveline] [1099] answered nothing. She felt her cheek pale and cold and, out of a
[Eveline] [1100] maze of distress, she prayed to God to direct her, to show her what
[Eveline] [1102] If she went, tomorrow she would be on the sea with Frank,
[Eveline] [1104] Could she still draw back after all he had done for her? Her
[Eveline] [1105] distress awoke a nausea in her body and she kept moving her lips
[Eveline] [1108] A bell clanged upon her heart. She felt him seize her hand:
[Eveline] [1113] her into them: he would drown her. She gripped with both hands at
[Eveline] [1119] frenzy. Amid the seas she sent a cry of anguish.
[Eveline] [1124] shouted at to go on but he still called to her. She set her white face
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1423] brought her into a field there. She told me she used to go with a
[Two Gallants] [1425] and paying the tram out and back. And one night she brought me
[Two Gallants] [1430] "Maybe she thinks you'll marry her," said Lenehan.
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1434] But she thinks I'm a bit of class, you know."
[Two Gallants] [1475] "Is she game for that?" asked Lenehan dubiously. "You can never
[Two Gallants] [1514] She was... a bit of all right," he said regretfully.
[Two Gallants] [1530] "Honest to God!" said Corley. "Didn't she tell me herself?"
[Two Gallants] [1566] she is."
[Two Gallants] [1584] "There she is!" said Corley.
[Two Gallants] [1586] At the corner of Hume Street a young woman was standing. She
[Two Gallants] [1587] wore a blue dress and a white sailor hat. She stood on the
[Two Gallants] [1622] to converse with her. She swung her umbrella more quickly and
[Two Gallants] [1624] her at close quarters she laughed and bent her head.
[Two Gallants] [1630] young woman's appearance. She had her Sunday finery on. Her
[Two Gallants] [1634] She wore a short black jacket with mother-of-pearl buttons and a
[Two Gallants] [1640] were blunt. She had broad nostrils, a straggling mouth which lay
[Two Gallants] [1783] hers from view for a few seconds and then she reappeared running
[The Boarding House] [1821] MRS. MOONEY was a butcher's daughter. She was a woman who
[The Boarding House] [1822] was quite able to keep things to herself: a determined woman. She
[The Boarding House] [1829] business. One night he went for his wife with the cleaver and she
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1833] separation from him with care of the children. She would give him
[The Boarding House] [1844] population was made up of clerks from the city. She governed the
[The Boarding House] [1865] also sing. She sang:
[The Boarding House] [1871] Polly was a slim girl of nineteen; she had light soft hair and a
[The Boarding House] [1873] through them, had a habit of glancing upwards when she spoke
[The Boarding House] [1878] word to his daughter, she had taken her daughter home again and
[The Boarding House] [1886] typewriting when she noticed that something was going on
[The Boarding House] [1887] between Polly and one of the young men. She watched the pair and
[The Boarding House] [1890] Polly knew that she was being watched, but still her mother's
[The Boarding House] [1896] perturbed. At last, when she judged it to be the right moment, Mrs.
[The Boarding House] [1897] Mooney intervened. She dealt with moral problems as a cleaver
[The Boarding House] [1898] deals with meat: and in this case she had made up her mind.
[The Boarding House] [1911] the servant Mary remove the breakfast things. She mad Mary
[The Boarding House] [1914] bread collected, the sugar and butter safe under lock and key, she
[The Boarding House] [1915] began to reconstruct the interview which she had had the night
[The Boarding House] [1916] before with Polly. Things were as she had suspected: she had been
[The Boarding House] [1918] Both had been somewhat awkward, of course. She had been made
[The Boarding House] [1922] her awkward but also because she did not wish it to be thought that
[The Boarding House] [1923] in her wise innocence she had divined the intention behind her
[The Boarding House] [1927] mantelpiece as soon as she had become aware through her revery
[The Boarding House] [1929] seventeen minutes past eleven: she would have lots of time to have
[The Boarding House] [1931] Marlborough Street. She was sure she would win. To begin with
[The Boarding House] [1932] she had all the weight of social opinion on her side: she was an
[The Boarding House] [1933] outraged mother. She had allowed him to live beneath her roof,
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1950] She counted all her cards again before sending Mary up to Doran's
[The Boarding House] [1951] room to say that she wished to speak with him. She felt sure she
[The Boarding House] [1954] Bantam Lyons her task would have been much harder. She did not
[The Boarding House] [1960] well. She knew he had a good screw for one thing and she
[The Boarding House] [1963] Nearly the half-hour! She stood up and surveyed herself in the
[The Boarding House] [1965] her and she thought of some mothers she knew who could not get
[The Boarding House] [1996] imagine his friends talking of the affair and laughing. She was a
[The Boarding House] [1997] little vulgar; some times she said "I seen" and "If I had've known."
[The Boarding House] [2000] she had done. Of course he had done it too. His instinct urged him
[The Boarding House] [2005] trousers she tapped lightly at his door and entered. She told him
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2007] her mother would speak with him that morning. She cried and
[The Boarding House] [2012] She would put an end to herself, she said.
[The Boarding House] [2021] him. Then late one night as he was undressing for she had tapped
[The Boarding House] [2022] at his door, timidly. She wanted to relight her candle at his for hers
[The Boarding House] [2023] had been blown out by a gust. It was her bath night. She wore a
[The Boarding House] [2027] as she lit and steadied her candle a faint perfume arose.
[The Boarding House] [2029] On nights when he came in very late it was she who warmed up his
[The Boarding House] [2075] Polly sat for a little time on the side of the bed, crying. Then she
[The Boarding House] [2076] dried her eyes and went over to the looking-glass. She dipped the
[The Boarding House] [2078] cool water. She looked at herself in profile and readjusted a
[The Boarding House] [2079] hairpin above her ear. Then she went back to the bed again and sat
[The Boarding House] [2080] at the foot. She regarded the pillows for a long time and the sight
[The Boarding House] [2081] of them awakened in her mind secret, amiable memories. She
[The Boarding House] [2086] She waited on patiently, almost cheerfully, without alarm. her
[The Boarding House] [2088] future. Her hopes and visions were so intricate that she no longer
[The Boarding House] [2090] that she was waiting for anything.
[The Boarding House] [2092] At last she heard her mother calling. She started to her feet and ran
[The Boarding House] [2101] Then she remembered what she had been waiting for.
[A Little Cloud] [2554] have a good fat account at the bank or she won't do for me."
[A Little Cloud] [2583] coffee from Bewley's. Of course she was in a bad humour and gave
[A Little Cloud] [2584] him short answers. She said she would do without any tea but
[A Little Cloud] [2586] she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and
[A Little Cloud] [2587] two pounds of sugar. She put the sleeping child deftly in his arms
[A Little Cloud] [2595] at it, pausing at the thin tight lips. She wore the pale blue summer
[A Little Cloud] [2606] when she heard the price she threw the blouse on the table and said
[A Little Cloud] [2608] first she wanted to take it back but when she tried it on she was
[A Little Cloud] [2680] "What is it? What is it?" she cried.
[A Little Cloud] [2687] She flung her parcels on the floor and snatched the child from him.
[A Little Cloud] [2689] "What have you done to him?" she cried, glaring into his face.
[A Little Cloud] [2698] Giving no heed to him she began to walk up and down the room,
[Counterparts] [2854] money. She came to the office often and stayed a long time when
[Counterparts] [2855] she came. She was sitting beside his desk now in an aroma of
[Counterparts] [2869] began to hurry Miss Parker, saying she would never have the
[Counterparts] [3042] her chin; and she wore bright yellow gloves, reaching to the elbow.
[Counterparts] [3043] Farrington gazed admiringly at the plump arm which she moved
[Counterparts] [3044] very often and with much grace; and when, after a little time, she
[Counterparts] [3046] The oblique staring expression in them fascinated him. She
[Counterparts] [3048] room, she brushed against his chair and said "O, pardon!" in a
[Counterparts] [3049] London accent. He watched her leave the room in the hope that she
[Counterparts] [3137] "That's right.... Did she think of leaving any dinner for me?"
[Clay] [3191] Maria was a very, very small person indeed but she had a very long
[Clay] [3192] nose and a very long chin. She talked a little through her nose,
[Clay] [3193] always soothingly: "Yes, my dear," and "No, my dear." She was
[Clay] [3201] compliment. And Ginger Mooney was always saying what she
[Clay] [3205] The women would have their tea at six o'clock and she would be
[Clay] [3208] and twenty minutes to buy the things. She would be there before
[Clay] [3209] eight. She took out her purse with the silver clasps and read again
[Clay] [3210] the words A Present from Belfast. She was very fond of that purse
[Clay] [3213] were two half-crowns and some coppers. She would have five
[Clay] [3215] would have, all the children singing! Only she hoped that Joe
[Clay] [3219] Often he had wanted her to go and live with them;-but she would
[Clay] [3221] with her) and she had become accustomed to the life of the
[Clay] [3222] laundry. Joe was a good fellow. She had nursed him and Alphy
[Clay] [3228] Dublin by Lamplight laundry, and she liked it. She used to have
[Clay] [3229] such a bad opinion of Protestants but now she thought they were
[Clay] [3231] people to live with. Then she had her plants in the conservatory
[Clay] [3232] and she liked looking after them. She had lovely ferns and
[Clay] [3233] wax-plants and, whenever anyone came to visit her, she always
[Clay] [3235] one thing she didn't like and that was the tracts on the walks; but
[Clay] [3238] When the cook told her everything was ready she went into the
[Clay] [3249] many Hallow Eves, Maria had to laugh and say she didn't want any
[Clay] [3250] ring or man either; and when she laughed her grey-green eyes
[Clay] [3254] with their mugs on the table, and said she was sorry she hadn't a
[Clay] [3257] nearly shook itself asunder because she knew that Mooney meant
[Clay] [3258] well though, of course, she had the notions of a common woman.
[Clay] [3262] She went into her little bedroom and, remembering that the next
[Clay] [3264] seven to six. Then she took off her working skirt and her
[Clay] [3266] dress-boots beside the foot of the bed. She changed her blouse too
[Clay] [3267] and, as she stood before the mirror, she thought of how she used to
[Clay] [3268] dress for mass on Sunday morning when she was a young girl; and
[Clay] [3269] she looked with quaint affection at the diminutive body which she
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3273] When she got outside the streets were shining with rain and she
[Clay] [3274] was glad of her old brown waterproof. The tram was full and she
[Clay] [3276] people, with her toes barely touching the floor. She arranged in her
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3279] She hoped they would have a nice evening. She was sure they
[Clay] [3280] would but she could not help thinking what a pity it was Alphy and
[Clay] [3285] She got out of her tram at the Pillar and ferreted her way quickly
[Clay] [3286] among the crowds. She went into Downes's cake-shop but the shop
[Clay] [3287] was so full of people that it was a long time before she could get
[Clay] [3288] herself attended to. She bought a dozen of mixed penny cakes, and
[Clay] [3289] at last came out of the shop laden with a big bag. Then she thought
[Clay] [3290] what else would she buy: she wanted to buy something really nice.
[Clay] [3292] to know what to buy and all she could think of was cake. She
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3295] Henry Street. Here she was a long time in suiting herself and the
[Clay] [3297] annoyed by her, asked her was it wedding-cake she wanted to buy.
[Clay] [3304] She thought she would have to stand in the Drumcondra tram
[Clay] [3309] she reflected how much more polite he was than the young men
[Clay] [3316] she was getting out at the Canal Bridge she thanked him and
[Clay] [3318] agreeably, and while she was going up along the terrace, bending
[Clay] [3319] her tiny head under the rain, she thought how easy it was to know a
[Clay] [3322] Everybody said: "0, here's Maria!" when she came to Joe's house.
[Clay] [3332] But Maria said she had brought something special for papa and
[Clay] [3333] mamma, something they would be sure to like, and she began to
[Clay] [3334] look for her plumcake. She tried in Downes's bag and then in the
[Clay] [3336] could she find it. Then she asked all the children had any of them
[Clay] [3344] little surprise and of the two and fourpence she had thrown away
[Clay] [3345] for nothing she nearly cried outright.
[Clay] [3351] the answer he had made but she said that the manager must have
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3360] her. Then Joe asked would she take a bottle of stout and Mrs.
[Clay] [3361] Donnelly said there was port wine too in the house if she would
[Clay] [3362] prefer that. Maria said she would rather they didn't ask her to take
[Clay] [3366] old times and Maria thought she would put in a good word for
[Clay] [3368] he spoke a word to his brother again and Maria said she was sorry
[Clay] [3369] she had mentioned the matter. Mrs. Donnelly told her husband it
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[Clay] [3388] her hand out in the air as she was told to do. She moved her hand
[Clay] [3390] saucers. She felt a soft wet substance with her fingers and was
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3397] to do it over again: and this time she got the prayer-book.
[Clay] [3402] convent before the year was out because she had got the
[Clay] [3404] that night, so full of pleasant talk and reminiscences. She said they
[Clay] [3408] would she not sing some little song before she went, one of the old
[Clay] [3411] children be quiet and listen to Maria's song. Then she played the
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3414] Dwelt, and when she came to the second verse she sang again:
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[A Painful Case] [3512] she seemed so little awkward. While they talked he tried to fix her
[A Painful Case] [3527] diverted to become intimate. She alluded once or twice to her
[A Painful Case] [3535] appointment. She came. This was the first of many meetings; they
[A Painful Case] [3545] enjoying the lady's society. Neither he nor she had had any such
[A Painful Case] [3549] her. She listened to all.
[A Painful Case] [3551] Sometimes in return for his theories she gave out some fact of her
[A Painful Case] [3552] own life. With almost maternal solicitude she urged him to let his
[A Painful Case] [3553] nature open to the full: she became his confessor. He told her that
[A Painful Case] [3566] She asked him why did he not write out his thoughts. For what, he
[A Painful Case] [3575] warm soil about an exotic. Many times she allowed the dark to fall
[A Painful Case] [3586] these discourses was that one night during which she had shown
[A Painful Case] [3599] towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that,
[A Painful Case] [3666] her and shouted, but, before he could reach her, she was caught by
[A Painful Case] [3704] of going out at night to buy spirits. She, witness, had often tried to
[A Painful Case] [3705] reason with her mother and had induced her to join a League. She
[A Painful Case] [3728] vulgar death attacked his stomach. Not merely had she degraded
[A Painful Case] [3729] herself; she had degraded him. He saw the squalid tract of her vice,
[A Painful Case] [3732] to be filled by the barman. Just God, what an end! Evidently she
[A Painful Case] [3735] reared. But that she could have sunk so low! Was it possible he
[A Painful Case] [3763] realised that she was dead, that she had ceased to exist, that she
[A Painful Case] [3768] blame? Now that she was gone he understood how lonely her life
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3876] done many a time before. The mother, you know, she cocks him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4577] Pledge in the cup she lifts to Joy
[A Mother] [4608] Miss Devlin had become Mrs. Kearney out of spite. She had been
[A Mother] [4609] educated in a high-class convent, where she had learned French
[A Mother] [4610] and music. As she was naturally pale and unbending in manner she
[A Mother] [4611] made few friends at school. When she came to the age of marriage
[A Mother] [4612] she was sent out to many houses, where her playing and ivory
[A Mother] [4613] manners were much admired. She sat amid the chilly circle of her
[A Mother] [4615] a brilliant life. But the young men whom she met were ordinary
[A Mother] [4616] and she gave them no encouragement, trying to console her
[A Mother] [4618] secret. However, when she drew near the limit and her friends
[A Mother] [4619] began to loosen their tongues about her, she silenced them by
[A Mother] [4622] He was much older than she. His conversation, which was serious,
[A Mother] [4625] wear better than a romantic person, but she never put her own
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4629] him. At some party in a strange house when she lifted her eyebrow
[A Mother] [4631] troubled him, she put the eider-down quilt over his feet and made a
[A Mother] [4636] good convent, where she learned French and music, and afterward
[A Mother] [4656] often on people's lips. People said that she was very clever at
[A Mother] [4657] music and a very nice girl and, moreover, that she was a believer
[A Mother] [4659] Therefore she was not surprised when one day Mr. Holohan came
[A Mother] [4662] in the Antient Concert Rooms. She brought him into the
[A Mother] [4664] and the silver biscuit-barrel. She entered heart and soul into the
[A Mother] [4671] Kearney helped him. She had tact. She knew what artistes should
[A Mother] [4672] go into capitals and what artistes should go into small type. She
[A Mother] [4674] Meade's comic turn. To keep the audience continually diverted she
[A Mother] [4677] point. She was invariably friendly and advising--homely, in fact.
[A Mother] [4678] She pushed the decanter towards him, saying:
[A Mother] [4682] And while he was helping himself she said:
[A Mother] [4689] when a little expense is justifiable. She took a dozen of
[A Mother] [4691] friends who could not be trusted to come otherwise. She forgot
[A Mother] [4697] Antient Concert Rooms on Wednesday night she did not like the
[A Mother] [4700] dress. She passed by with her daughter and a quick glance through
[A Mother] [4702] idleness. At first she wondered had she mistaken the hour. No, it
[A Mother] [4705] In the dressing-room behind the stage she was introduced to the
[A Mother] [4706] secretary of the Society, Mr. Fitzpatrick. She smiled and shook his
[A Mother] [4707] hand. He was a little man, with a white, vacant face. She noticed
[A Mother] [4727] When she had an opportunity, she called Mr. Holohan aside and
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [4741] expense for such a concert. There was something she didn't like in
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4757] bumper house on Saturday night. When she heard this, she sought
[A Mother] [4758] out Mr. Holohan. She buttonholed him as he was limping out
[A Mother] [4762] "But, of course, that doesn't alter the contract," she said. "The
[A Mother] [4767] She called Mr. Fitzpatrick away from his screen and told him that
[A Mother] [4769] according to the terms of the contract, she should receive the sum
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4789] her on Saturday night. She agreed. She respected her husband in
[A Mother] [4790] the same way as she respected the General Post Office, as
[A Mother] [4791] something large, secure and fixed; and though she knew the small
[A Mother] [4792] number of his talents she appreciated his abstract value as a male.
[A Mother] [4793] She was glad that he had suggested coming with her. She thought
[A Mother] [4802] Fitzpatrick. She could find neither. She asked the stewards was any
[A Mother] [4805] to whom Mrs. Kearney explained that she wanted to see one of the
[A Mother] [4807] could she do anything. Mrs. Kearney looked searchingly at the
[A Mother] [4813] The little woman hoped they would have a good house. She looked
[A Mother] [4815] trustfulness and enthusiasm from her twisted features. Then she
[A Mother] [4854] rapidly and a pleasant noise circulated in the auditorium. She came
[A Mother] [4856] evidently about Kathleen for they both glanced at her often as she
[A Mother] [4861] that she was Madam Glynn, the soprano.
[A Mother] [4868] who was the unknown woman. Mr. Holohan said that she was
[A Mother] [4879] them amiably. She wanted to be on good terms with them but,
[A Mother] [4880] while she strove to be polite, her eyes followed Mr. Holohan in his
[A Mother] [4881] limping and devious courses. As soon as she could she excused
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4889] she didn't know anything about Mr. Fitzpatrick. Her daughter had
[A Mother] [4890] signed a contract for eight guineas and she would have to be paid.
[A Mother] [4904] When she came back to the dressing-room her cheeks were slightly
[A Mother] [4965] "She won't go on. She must get her eight guineas."
[A Mother] [4973] "She won't go on without her money."
[A Mother] [4981] The baritone had not seen her but he had been told that she was
[A Mother] [4992] counted out four into Mrs. Kearney's hand and said she would get
[A Mother] [5005] pronunciation which she believed lent elegance to her singing. She
[A Mother] [5006] looked as if she had been resurrected from an old stage-wardrobe
[A Mother] [5033] her scandalously. She had spared neither trouble nor expense and
[A Mother] [5034] this was how she was repaid.
[A Mother] [5037] they could ride roughshod over her. But she would show them
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[A Mother] [5040] her rights: she wouldn't be fooled. If they didn't pay her to the last
[A Mother] [5041] farthing she would make Dublin ring. Of course she was sorry for
[A Mother] [5042] the sake of the artistes. But what else could she do? She appealed
[A Mother] [5043] to the second tenor who said he thought she had not been well
[A Mother] [5044] treated. Then she appealed to Miss Healy. Miss Healy wanted to
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[A Mother] [5057] daughter has her contract. She will get four pounds eight into her
[A Mother] [5058] hand or a foot she won't put on that platform."
[A Mother] [5065] Her face was inundated with an angry colour and she looked as if
[A Mother] [5066] she would attack someone with her hands.
[A Mother] [5068] "I'm asking for my rights." she said.
[A Mother] [5075] She tossed her head and assumed a haughty voice:
[A Mother] [5084] everyone approved of what the committee had done. She stood at
[A Mother] [5086] daughter, gesticulating with them. She waited until it was time for
[A Mother] [5090] baritone and his accompanist to pass up to the platform. She stood
[A Mother] [5092] notes of the song struck her ear, she caught up her daughter's cloak
[A Mother] [5098] daughter and followed him. As she passed through the doorway
[A Mother] [5099] she stopped and glared into Mr. Holohan's face.
[A Mother] [5101] "I'm not done with you yet," she said.
[Grace] [5327] "I'm so sorry," she continued, "that I've nothing in the house to
[Grace] [5340] She saw him to the door. The carman was stamping up and down
[Grace] [5343] "It's very kind of you to bring him home," she said.
[Grace] [5358] Then she withdrew them, went into the house and emptied her
[Grace] [5361] She was an active, practical woman of middle age. Not long before
[Grace] [5362] she had celebrated her silver wedding and renewed her intimacy
[Grace] [5365] to her a not ungallant figure: and she still hurried to the chapel
[Grace] [5367] recalled with vivid pleasure how she had passed out of the Star of
[Grace] [5371] his other arm. After three weeks she had found a wife's life
[Grace] [5372] irksome and, later on, when she was beginning to find it
[Grace] [5373] unbearable, she had become a mother. The part of mother
[Grace] [5375] years she had kept house shrewdly for her husband. Her two eldest
[Grace] [5382] She made beef-tea for him and scolded him roundly. She accepted
[Grace] [5386] since the boys had grown up, and she knew that he would walk to
[Grace] [5390] Two nights after, his friends came to see him. She brought them up
[Grace] [5413] drunkard. He had set up house for her six times; and each time she
[Grace] [5428] After a quarter of a century of married life, she had very few
[Grace] [5429] illusions left. Religion for her was a habit, and she suspected that a
[Grace] [5431] She was tempted to see a curious appropriateness in his accident
[Grace] [5432] and, but that she did not wish to seem bloody-minded, would have
[Grace] [5436] it could do no harm. Her beliefs were not extravagant. She
[Grace] [5439] was bounded by her kitchen, but, if she was put to it, she could
[Grace] [5615] Mr. Power stood up to officiate, offering her his chair. She
[Grace] [5616] declined it, saying she was ironing downstairs, and, after having
[Grace] [6018] Kernan came into the room, drying her hands she came into a
[Grace] [6019] solemn company. She did not disturb the silence, but leaned over
[Grace] [6059] So she said:
[The Dead] [6217] Hardly had she brought one gentleman into the little pantry behind
[The Dead] [6219] than the wheezy hall-door bell clanged again and she had to
[The Dead] [6221] for her she had not to attend to the ladies also. But Miss Kate and
[The Dead] [6240] was now the main prop of the household, for she had the organ in
[The Dead] [6241] Haddington Road. She had been through the Academy and gave a
[The Dead] [6245] did their share. Julia, though she was quite grey, was still the
[The Dead] [6252] seldom made a mistake in the orders, so that she got on well with
[The Dead] [6267] "O, Mr. Conroy," said Lily to Gabriel when she opened the door
[The Dead] [6280] them kissed Gabriel's wife, said she must be perished alive, and
[The Dead] [6296] She had preceded him into the pantry to help him off with his
[The Dead] [6297] overcoat. Gabriel smiled at the three syllables she had given his
[The Dead] [6298] surname and glanced at her. She was a slim; growing girl, pale in
[The Dead] [6300] made her look still paler. Gabriel had known her when she was a
[The Dead] [6313] "O no, sir," she answered. "I'm done schooling this year and more."
[The Dead] [6379] shadows, was her large flaccid face. Though she was stout in build
[The Dead] [6381] appearance of a woman who did not know where she was or where
[The Dead] [6382] she was going. Aunt Kate was more vivacious. Her face, healthier
[The Dead] [6402] "Quite right, Gabriel, quite right," she said. "You can't be too
[The Dead] [6406] snow if she were let."
[The Dead] [6410] "Don't mind him, Aunt Kate," she said. "He's really an awful
[The Dead] [6413] poor child! And she simply hates the sight of it!... O, but you'll
[The Dead] [6416] She broke out into a peal of laughter and glanced at her husband,
[The Dead] [6427] Aunt Kate nearly doubled herself, so heartily did she enjoy the
[The Dead] [6430] pause she asked:
[The Dead] [6447] because she says the word reminds her of Christy Minstrels."
[The Dead] [6463] don't know what has come over her lately. She's not the girl she
[The Dead] [6467] she broke off suddenly to gaze after her sister, who had wandered
[The Dead] [6470] "Now, I ask you," she said almost testily, "where is Julia going?
[The Dead] [6548] name of the pretty waltz she had played; and Mr. Browne, seeing
[The Dead] [6620] "Now, isn't he a terrible fellow!" she said. "And his poor mother
[The Dead] [6624] Before leaving the room with Gabriel she signalled to Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [6626] Browne nodded in answer and, when she had gone, said to Freddy
[The Dead] [6648] drawing-room. He liked music but the piece she was playing had
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6670] of the Morkan family. Both she and Julia had always seemed a
[The Dead] [6672] stood before the pierglass. She held an open book on her knees and
[The Dead] [6674] man-o-war suit, lay at her feet. It was she who had chosen the
[The Dead] [6675] name of her sons for she was very sensible of the dignity of family
[The Dead] [6680] phrases she had used still rankled in his memory; she had once
[The Dead] [6685] He knew that Mary Jane must be near the end of her piece for she
[The Dead] [6690] Mary Jane as, blushing and rolling up her music nervously, she
[The Dead] [6697] Ivors. She was a frank-mannered talkative young lady, with a
[The Dead] [6698] freckled face and prominent brown eyes. She did not wear a
[The Dead] [6702] When they had taken their places she said abruptly:
[The Dead] [6708] She nodded her head gravely.
[The Dead] [6715] understand, when she said bluntly:
[The Dead] [6749] When they were together again she spoke of the University
[The Dead] [6751] her his review of Browning's poems. That was how she had found
[The Dead] [6752] out the secret: but she liked the review immensely. Then she said
[The Dead] [6760] she?"
[The Dead] [6817] was surprised to feel his hand firmly pressed. She looked at him
[The Dead] [6819] Then, just as the chain was about to start again, she stood on tiptoe
[The Dead] [6825] of the room where Freddy Malins' mother was sitting. She was a
[The Dead] [6827] like her son's and she stuttered slightly. She had been told that
[The Dead] [6829] her whether she had had a good crossing. She lived with her
[The Dead] [6831] year. She answered placidly that she had had a beautiful crossing
[The Dead] [6832] and that the captain had been most attentive to her. She spoke also
[The Dead] [6836] with Miss Ivors. Of course the girl or woman, or whatever she was,
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6839] call him a West Briton before people, even in joke. She had tried
[The Dead] [6844] couples. When she reached him she said into his ear:
[The Dead] [6859] "No row. Why? Did she say so?"
[The Dead] [6864] "There was no row," said Gabriel moodily, "only she wanted me to
[The Dead] [6869] "O, do go, Gabriel," she cried. "I'd love to see Galway again."
[The Dead] [6873] She looked at him for a moment, then turned to Mrs. Malins and
[The Dead] [6878] While she was threading her way back across the room Mrs.
[The Dead] [6886] Gabriel hardly heard what she said. Now that supper was coming
[The Dead] [6905] Ivors had praised the review. Was she sincere? Had she really any
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6909] while he spoke with her critical quizzing eyes. Perhaps she would
[The Dead] [6929] embellish the air and though she sang very rapidly she did not miss
[The Dead] [6935] colour struggled into Aunt Julia's face as she bent to replace in the
[The Dead] [6953] compliments as she released her hand from his grasp. Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [6974] "I often told Julia," said Aunt Kate emphatically, "that she was
[The Dead] [6975] simply thrown away in that choir. But she never would be said by
[The Dead] [6978] She turned as if to appeal to the good sense of the others against a
[The Dead] [6982] "No," continued Aunt Kate, "she wouldn't be said or led by anyone,
[The Dead] [6998] She had worked herself into a passion and would have continued
[The Dead] [7027] would not stay. She did not feel in the least hungry and she had
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7060] "Beannacht libh," cried Miss Ivors, with a laugh, as she ran down
[The Dead] [7066] departure. But she did not seem to be in ill humour: she had gone
[The Dead] [7072] "Where is Gabriel?" she cried. "Where on earth is Gabriel? There's
[The Dead] [7119] Jane's idea and she had also suggested apple sauce for the goose
[The Dead] [7121] sauce had always been good enough for her and she hoped she
[The Dead] [7146] came forward with three potatoes which she had reserved for him.
[The Dead] [7157] of the company but Miss Furlong thought she had a rather vulgar
[The Dead] [7178] Mignon. Of course it was very fine, she said, but it made her think
[The Dead] [7232] she received praises for it from all quarters She herself said that it
[The Dead] [7351] Gabriel's mind that Miss Ivors was not there and that she had gone
[The Dead] [7399] Aunt Julia did not understand but she looked up, smiling, at
[The Dead] [7473] "Really," she said archly, "he is very attentive."
[The Dead] [7478] She laughed herself this time good-humouredly and then added
[The Dead] [7587] the seat, Mr. Browne helping him with advice. At last she was
[The Dead] [7626] his wife. She was leaning on the banisters, listening to something.
[The Dead] [7634] and mystery in her attitude as if she were a symbol of something.
[The Dead] [7667] before she reached it the singing stopped and the piano was closed
[The Dead] [7670] "O, what a pity!" she cried. "Is he coming down, Gretta?"
[The Dead] [7714] did not join in the conversation. She was standing right under the
[The Dead] [7717] She was in the same attitude and seemed unaware of the talk about
[The Dead] [7718] her. At last she turned towards them and Gabriel saw that there was
[The Dead] [7722] "Mr. D'Arcy," she said, "what is the name of that song you were
[The Dead] [7728] "The Lass of Aughrim," she repeated. "I couldn't think of the
[The Dead] [7737] Seeing that all were ready to start she shepherded them to the door,
[The Dead] [7768] She was walking on before him with Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, her shoes
[The Dead] [7770] skirt up from the slush. She had no longer any grace of attitude,
[The Dead] [7775] She was walking on before him so lightly and so erect that he
[The Dead] [7777] say something foolish and affectionate into her ear. She seemed to
[The Dead] [7811] her. When the others had gone away, when he and she were in the
[The Dead] [7817] Perhaps she would not hear at once: she would be undressing.
[The Dead] [7818] Then something in his voice would strike her. She would turn and
[The Dead] [7822] its rattling noise as it saved him from conversation. She was
[The Dead] [7851] She leaned for a moment on his arm in getting out of the cab and
[The Dead] [7853] She leaned lightly on his arm, as lightly as when she had danced
[The Dead] [7855] happy that she was his, proud of her grace and wifely carriage. But
[The Dead] [7867] thickly carpeted stairs. She mounted the stairs behind the porter,
[The Dead] [7900] light. She had taken off her hat and cloak and was standing before
[The Dead] [7906] She turned away from the mirror slowly and walked along the
[The Dead] [7913] "I am a little," she answered.
[The Dead] [7919] She went on to the window and stood there, looking out. Gabriel
[The Dead] [7936] He was trembling now with annoyance. Why did she seem so
[The Dead] [7937] abstracted? He did not know how he could begin. Was she
[The Dead] [7938] annoyed, too, about something? If she would only turn to him or
[The Dead] [7939] come to him of her own accord! To take her as she was would be
[The Dead] [7943] "When did you lend him the pound?" she asked, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7954] come from the window. She stood before him for an instant,
[The Dead] [7956] and resting her hands lightly on his shoulders, she kissed him.
[The Dead] [7958] "You are a very generous person, Gabriel," she said.
[The Dead] [7964] over with happiness. Just when he was wishing for it she had come
[The Dead] [7966] with his. Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in
[The Dead] [7967] him, and then the yielding mood had come upon her. Now that she
[The Dead] [7977] She did not answer nor yield wholly to his arm. He said again,
[The Dead] [7983] She did not answer at once. Then she said in an outburst of tears:
[The Dead] [7987] She broke loose from him and ran to the bed and, throwing her
[The Dead] [7998] She raised her head from her arms and dried her eyes with the
[The Dead] [8010] my grandmother," she said.
[The Dead] [8018] "It was a young boy I used to know," she answered, "named
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8031] "I used to go out walking with him," she said, "when I was in
[The Dead] [8039] She looked at him and asked in surprise:
[The Dead] [8048] She looked away from him along the shaft of light towards the
[The Dead] [8051] "He is dead," she said at length. "He died when he was only
[The Dead] [8056] "He was in the gasworks," she said.
[The Dead] [8061] full of tenderness and joy and desire, she had been comparing him
[The Dead] [8068] lest she might see the shame that burned upon his forehead.
[The Dead] [8076] "I was great with him at that time," she said.
[The Dead] [8084] "I think he died for me," she answered.
[The Dead] [8091] again, for he felt that she would tell him of herself. Her hand was
[The Dead] [8096] "It was in the winter," she said, "about the beginning of the winter
[The Dead] [8103] She paused for a moment and sighed.
[The Dead] [8105] "Poor fellow," she said. "He was very fond of me and he was such
[The Dead] [8119] She paused for a moment to get her voice under control, and then
[The Dead] [8141] She stopped, choking with sobs, and, overcome by emotion, flung
[The Dead] [8152] She was fast asleep.
[The Dead] [8156] her deep-drawn breath. So she had had that romance in her life: a
[The Dead] [8159] while she slept, as though he and she had never lived together as
[The Dead] [8161] her hair: and, as he thought of what she must have been then, in
[The Dead] [8167] Perhaps she had not told him all the story. His eyes moved to the
[The Dead] [8168] chair over which she had thrown some of her clothes. A petticoat
[The Dead] [8175] Julia! She, too, would soon be a shade with the shade of Patrick
[The Dead] [8177] face for a moment when she was singing Arrayed for the Bridal.
[The Dead] [8190] wither dismally with age. He thought of how she who lay beside