Dubliners by James Joyce
so

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 172 occurrences of the word:   so

[The Sisters] [37] "Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear."
[The Sisters] [47] I knew that I was under observation so I continued eating as if the
[The Sisters] [83] "It's bad for children," said old Cotter, "because their mind are so
[The Sisters] [99] wondered why it smiled continually and why the lips were so
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [337] But still.... They say it was the boy's fault. But poor James was so
[The Sisters] [345] himself, talking to no one and wandering about by himself. So one
[The Sisters] [348] couldn't see a sight of him anywhere. So then the clerk suggested
[The Sisters] [349] to try the chapel. So then they got the keys and opened the chapel
[The Sisters] [362] "Wide-awake and laughing-like to himself.... So then, of course,
[An Encounter] [477] "That's forfeit," said Mahony. "And so much the better for us--a
[An Encounter] [486] boys were too small and so we walked on, the ragged troop
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [561] ground with his stick, so slowly that I thought he was looking for
[An Encounter] [575] book he mentioned so that in the end he said:
[An Encounter] [608] girls were not so good as they seemed to be if one only knew.
[An Encounter] [609] There was nothing he liked, he said, so much as looking at a nice
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [660] so I met the gaze of a pair of bottle-green eyes peering at me from
[An Encounter] [669] that there was nothing in this world he would like so well as that.
[Araby] [740] door. The blind was pulled down to within an inch of the sash so
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Eveline] [957] have been rather happy then. Her father was not so bad then; and
[Eveline] [965] objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years,
[After the Race] [1179] society of one who had seen so much of the world and was reputed
[After the Race] [1196] Rapid motion through space elates one; so does notoriety; so does
[After the Race] [1210] been so conscious of the labour latent in money when there had
[After the Race] [1212] much more so now when he was about to stake the greater part of
[Two Gallants] [1397] "That takes the solitary, unique, and, if I may so call it, recherche
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1666] through which he passed they did so morosely. He found trivial all
[Two Gallants] [1703] ate his food greedily and found it so good that he made a note of
[The Boarding House] [1834] neither money nor food nor house-room; and so he was obliged to
[The Boarding House] [1884] away: none of them meant business. Things went on so for a long
[The Boarding House] [1935] her hospitality. He was thirty-four or thirty-five years of age, so
[The Boarding House] [1946] sum of money; she had known cases of it. But she would not do so.
[The Boarding House] [1969] made two attempts to shave but his hand had been so unsteady that
[The Boarding House] [1972] so that he had to take them off and polish them with his
[The Boarding House] [1975] out every ridiculous detail of the affair and in the end had so
[The Boarding House] [2053] Going down the stairs his glasses became so dimmed with
[The Boarding House] [2073] down his throat, so he would.
[The Boarding House] [2088] future. Her hopes and visions were so intricate that she no longer
[A Little Cloud] [2143] shyness had always held him back; and so the books had remained
[A Little Cloud] [2218] mind. He was not so old--thirty-two. His temperament might be
[A Little Cloud] [2219] said to be just at the point of maturity. There were so many
[A Little Cloud] [2239] He pursued his revery so ardently that he passed his street and had
[A Little Cloud] [2286] odd half-one or so when I meet any of the old crowd: that's all."
[A Little Cloud] [2326] "And is it really so beautiful as they say?" asked Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2332] the flavour of his drink. "It's not so beautiful, you know. Of course,
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2435] Ignatius Gallaher. "I didn't know your address or I'd have done so
[A Little Cloud] [2542] "You think so?" he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2579] Monica came for an hour or so in the morning and an hour or so in
[A Little Cloud] [2616] pretty. But he found something mean in it. Why was it so
[A Little Cloud] [2648] melancholy of his soul in verse? There were so many things he
[Counterparts] [2738] shot his head up over a pile of documents. The head itself was so
[Counterparts] [2842] porter he had gulped down so hastily confused the man and, as he
[Counterparts] [2877] something violently. He was so enraged that he wrote Bernard
[Counterparts] [2889] His imagination had so abstracted him that his name was called
[Counterparts] [2895] he had made a faithful copy. The tirade continued: it was so bitter
[Counterparts] [2975] "So, I just looked at him--coolly, you know, and looked at her.
[Counterparts] [2993] asked him to give his version of it, and he did so with great
[Counterparts] [3003] money but neither of the other two seemed to have any; so the
[Counterparts] [3053] there was one thing that he hated it was a sponge. He was so angry
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Clay] [3203] for Maria. Everyone was so fond of Maria.
[Clay] [3216] wouldn't come in drunk. He was so different when he took any
[Clay] [3220] have felt herself in the way (though Joe's wife was ever so nice
[Clay] [3236] the matron was such a nice person to deal with, so genteel.
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3270] had so often adorned, In spite of its years she found it a nice tidy
[Clay] [3287] was so full of people that it was a long time before she could get
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3350] manager. Maria did not understand why Joe laughed so much over
[Clay] [3352] been a very overbearing person to deal with. Joe said he wasn't so
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3365] So Maria let him have his way and they sat by the fire talking over
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3403] prayer-book. Maria had never seen Joe so nice to her as he was
[Clay] [3404] that night, so full of pleasant talk and reminiscences. She said they
[Clay] [3409] songs. Mrs. Donnelly said "Do, please, Maria!" and so Maria had
[Clay] [3431] whatever other people might say; and his eyes filled up so much
[A Painful Case] [3508] "What a pity there is such a poor house tonight! It's so hard on
[A Painful Case] [3512] she seemed so little awkward. While they talked he tried to fix her
[A Painful Case] [3514] beside her was her daughter he judged her to be a year or so
[A Painful Case] [3541] question. He had dismissed his wife so sincerely from his gallery
[A Painful Case] [3599] towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that,
[A Painful Case] [3735] reared. But that she could have sunk so low! Was it possible he
[A Painful Case] [3736] had deceived himself so utterly about her? He remembered her
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3862] cigarette. As he did so the flame lit up a leaf of dark glossy ivy the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3955] Isn't that so, Mat?" said Mr. Hynes, addressing Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3989] down the collar of his coat, displaying, as he did so, an ivy leaf in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4029] "Why so?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4095] Mr. Henchy snuffled vigorously and spat so copiously that he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4179] "No, but the stairs is so dark."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4246] "So far as owing money goes...."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4301] "Ah, well, he's not so bad after all. He's as good as his word,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4347] "That so, John?"
[A Mother] [4630] ever so slightly he stood up to take his leave and, when his cough
[A Mother] [4654] crossing of so man hands, and said good-bye to one another in
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4834] spoke little. He said yous so softly that it passed unnoticed and he
[A Mother] [4946] Kearney was speaking so animatedly to her husband that he had to
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[Grace] [5282] mimicry. Modern business methods had spared him only so far as
[Grace] [5320] his, not like some of the others he does be with. They're all right so
[Grace] [5327] "I'm so sorry," she continued, "that I've nothing in the house to
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5466] "Pain? Not much," answered Mr. Kernan. "But it's so sickening. I
[Grace] [5686] "So we're going to wash the pot together," said Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5721] "Is that so?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5786] "Is that so?" said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5873] "So he was," said Mr. Cunningham, "if not the most so. His motto,
[Grace] [5894] "Is that so?" said Mr. Fogarty.
[Grace] [6059] So she said:
[Grace] [6169] of the mammon of iniquity so that when you die they may receive
[The Dead] [6252] seldom made a mistake in the orders, so that she got on well with
[The Dead] [6377] women. Aunt Julia was an inch or so the taller. Her hair, drawn
[The Dead] [6427] Aunt Kate nearly doubled herself, so heartily did she enjoy the
[The Dead] [6507] Miss Morkan, the reason they are so fond of me is----"
[The Dead] [6545] had assumed a very low Dublin accent so that the young ladies,
[The Dead] [6571] two dances, but really we're so short of ladies tonight."
[The Dead] [6613] "He's not so bad, is he?" said Aunt Kate to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6772] fellows and so----"
[The Dead] [6852] over so that we'll have the table to ourselves."
[The Dead] [6859] "No row. Why? Did she say so?"
[The Dead] [6925] longer smiling, half turned so as to pitch her voice fairly into the
[The Dead] [6934] from the invisible supper-table. It sounded so genuine that a little
[The Dead] [6946] "I was just telling my mother," he said, "I never heard you sing so
[The Dead] [6947] well, never. No, I never heard your voice so good as it is tonight.
[The Dead] [6949] word and honour that's the truth. I never heard your voice sound so
[The Dead] [6950] fresh and so... so clear and fresh, never."
[The Dead] [6964] discovery. All I can say is I never heard her sing half so well as
[The Dead] [7021] "So that we had better go to supper," said Mary Jane, "and finish
[The Dead] [7040] "Ever so much, I assure you," said Miss Ivors, "but you really must
[The Dead] [7130] so that he compromised by taking a long draught of stout for he
[The Dead] [7135] them to sit down and eat their suppers and so did Gabriel but they
[The Dead] [7136] said there was time enough, so that, at last, Freddy Malins stood up
[The Dead] [7203] "Maybe so," said Mr. Browne. "But I may tell you I doubt it
[The Dead] [7244] son was going down to Mount Melleray in a week or so. The table
[The Dead] [7336] no tradition which does it so much honour and which it should
[The Dead] [7337] guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is
[The Dead] [7344] good ladies aforesaid--and I wish from my heart it may do so for
[The Dead] [7462] standing so that Aunt Kate said:
[The Dead] [7545] "Amen," said Gabriel. "So the old gentleman, as I said, harnessed
[The Dead] [7704] "So do I," said Miss O'Callaghan. "I think Christmas is never really
[The Dead] [7745] "Good-night, Aunt Kate, and thanks ever so much. Goodnight,
[The Dead] [7775] She was walking on before him so lightly and so erect that he
[The Dead] [7778] him so frail that he longed to defend her against something and
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7856] now, after the kindling again of so many memories, the first touch
[The Dead] [7907] shaft of light towards him. Her face looked so serious and weary
[The Dead] [7936] He was trembling now with annoyance. Why did she seem so
[The Dead] [7968] had fallen to him so easily, he wondered why he had been so
[The Dead] [8025] "I can see him so plainly," she said, after a moment. "Such eyes as
[The Dead] [8052] seventeen. Isn't it a terrible thing to die so young as that?"
[The Dead] [8082] "And what did he die of so young, Gretta? Consumption, was it?"
[The Dead] [8115] see him so I wrote him a letter saying I was going up to Dublin and
[The Dead] [8124] window. The window was so wet I couldn't see, so I ran downstairs
[The Dead] [8156] her deep-drawn breath. So she had had that romance in her life: a
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her