Dubliners by James Joyce
street

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 87 occurrences of the word:   Street

[The Sisters] [105] house in Great Britain Street. It was an unassuming shop,
[The Sisters] [116] Meath Street), aged sixty-five years.
[The Sisters] [137] knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street,
[An Encounter] [376] went to eight- o'clock mass every morning in Gardiner Street and
[Araby] [695] NORTH RICHMOND STREET being blind, was a quiet street
[Araby] [699] of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one
[Araby] [716] eaten our dinners. When we met in the street the houses had grown
[Araby] [718] ever-changing violet and towards it the lamps of the street lifted
[Araby] [720] bodies glowed. Our shouts echoed in the silent street. The career
[Araby] [726] the buckled harness. When we returned to the street light from the
[Araby] [731] down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go
[Araby] [755] street-singers, who sang a come-all-you about O'Donovan Rossa,
[Araby] [831] below in the street. Their cries reached me weakened and
[Araby] [872] Street towards the station. The sight of the streets thronged with
[Eveline] [1068] dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street
[After the Race] [1229] They drove down Dame Street. The street was busy with unusual
[After the Race] [1236] car steered out slowly for Grafton Street while the two young men
[After the Race] [1284] Grafton Street a short fat man was putting two handsome ladies on
[Two Gallants] [1402] public-house in Dorset Street. Most people considered Lenehan a
[Two Gallants] [1417] "One night, man," he said, "I was going along Dame Street and I
[Two Gallants] [1420] me she was a slavey in a house in Baggot Street. I put my arm
[Two Gallants] [1450] parade and, when he wished to gaze after someone in the street, it
[Two Gallants] [1518] "She's on the turf now. I saw her driving down Earl Street one
[Two Gallants] [1568] They walked along Nassau Street and then turned into Kildare
[Two Gallants] [1569] Street. Not far from the porch of the club a harpist stood in the
[Two Gallants] [1579] The two young men walked up the street without speaking, the
[Two Gallants] [1586] At the corner of Hume Street a young woman was standing. She
[Two Gallants] [1614] "Corner of Merrion Street. We'll be coming back."
[Two Gallants] [1628] obliquely. As he approached Hume Street corner he found the air
[Two Gallants] [1665] Street. Though his eyes took note of many elements of the crowd
[Two Gallants] [1674] ease in the dark quiet street, the sombre look of which suited his
[Two Gallants] [1681] after glancing warily up and down the street, went into the shop
[Two Gallants] [1724] the shop to begin his wandering again. He went into Capel Street
[Two Gallants] [1726] Street. At the corner of George's Street he met two friends of his
[Two Gallants] [1733] Street. At this Lenehan said that he had been with Mac the night
[Two Gallants] [1735] Westmoreland Street asked was it true that Mac had won a bit over
[Two Gallants] [1739] He left his friends at a quarter to ten and went up George's Street.
[Two Gallants] [1741] Grafton Street. The crowd of girls and young men had thinned and
[Two Gallants] [1742] on his way up the street he heard many groups and couples bidding
[Two Gallants] [1746] return too soon. When he reached the corner of Merrion Street he
[Two Gallants] [1759] him the slip. His eyes searched the street: there was no sign of
[Two Gallants] [1775] They turned down Baggot Street and he followed them at once,
[Two Gallants] [1807] Corley swerved to the left and went up the side street. His features
[The Boarding House] [1841] Street, was a big imposing woman. Her house had a floating
[The Boarding House] [1855] son, who was clerk to a commission agent in Fleet Street, had the
[The Boarding House] [1903] the street beneath the raised sashes. The belfry of George's Church
[The Boarding House] [1931] Marlborough Street. She was sure she would win. To begin with
[A Little Cloud] [2150] swiftly down Henrietta Street. The golden sunset was waning and
[A Little Cloud] [2152] street. They stood or ran in the roadway or crawled up the steps
[A Little Cloud] [2169] walk swiftly in the street even by day and whenever he found
[A Little Cloud] [2178] He turned to the right towards Capel Street. Ignatius Gallaher on
[A Little Cloud] [2201] soul revolted against the dull inelegance of Capel Street. There
[A Little Cloud] [2239] He pursued his revery so ardently that he passed his street and had
[Counterparts] [2806] head and ran quickly down the rickety stairs. From the street door
[Counterparts] [2821] of February and the lamps in Eustace Street had been lit. The man
[Counterparts] [2956] pawn-office in Fleet Street. That was the dart! Why didn't he think
[Counterparts] [2965] his thumb and fingers. In Westmoreland Street the footpaths were
[Counterparts] [2985] made to the chief clerk when he was in Callan's of Fownes's Street;
[Counterparts] [3005] Duke Street Higgins and Nosey Flynn bevelled off to the left while
[Counterparts] [3027] Street.
[Clay] [3295] Henry Street. Here she was a long time in suiting herself and the
[A Painful Case] [3483] Street. Every morning he came in from Chapelizod by tram. At
[A Painful Case] [3486] he was set free. He dined in an eating-house in George's Street
[A Painful Case] [3617] having dined moderately in George's Street and read the evening
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3857] the Committee Room in Wicklow Street with Jack, the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4015] "Did you serve Aungier Street?" he asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4236] Suffolk Street corner."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4349] "Yes. I got him one or two sure things in Dawson Street, Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4414] Ward of Dawson Street. Fine old chap he is, too--regular old toff,
[A Mother] [4605] the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in
[A Mother] [4650] would assemble after mass at the corner of Cathedral Street. They
[A Mother] [4814] out at the rain until the melancholy of the wet street effaced all the
[Grace] [5235] When they came out into Grafton Street, Mr. Power whistled for
[Grace] [5252] The car drove off towards Westmoreland Street. As it passed
[Grace] [5283] to allow him a little office in Crowe Street, on the window blind of
[Grace] [5387] the end of Thomas Street and back again to book even a small
[Grace] [5808] Orangeman too. We went into Butler's in Moore Street--faith, was
[Grace] [6113] The transept of the Jesuit Church in Gardiner Street was almost
[The Dead] [7821] At the corner of Winetavern Street they met a cab. He was glad of
[The Dead] [7824] only a few words, pointing out some building or street. The horse
[The Dead] [7887] "We don't want any light. We have light enough from the street.
[The Dead] [7895] A ghastly light from the street lamp lay in a long shaft from one
[The Dead] [7898] the street in order that his emotion might calm a little. Then he
[The Dead] [7951] in Henry Street."