Dubliners by James Joyce
table

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 68 occurrences of the word:   table

[The Sisters] [78] My aunt brought the dish from the safe and put it on the table.
[The Sisters] [212] wine-glasses. She set these on the table and invited us to take a
[The Sisters] [330] I approached the table and tasted my sherry and then returned
[Araby] [842] gossip of the tea-table. The meal was prolonged beyond an hour
[After the Race] [1329] Cards! cards! The table was cleared. Villona returned quietly to his
[After the Race] [1354] folly. He leaned his elbows on the table and rested his head
[Two Gallants] [1686] breakfast-time. He sat down at an uncovered wooden table
[Two Gallants] [1699] elbows on the table. The mechanic and the two work-girls
[The Boarding House] [1908] house and the table of the breakfast-room was covered with plates
[The Boarding House] [1913] Tuesday's bread- pudding. When the table was cleared, the broken
[A Little Cloud] [2592] A little lamp with a white china shade stood upon the table and its
[A Little Cloud] [2606] when she heard the price she threw the blouse on the table and said
[A Little Cloud] [2634] A volume of Byron's poems lay before him on the table. He opened
[Counterparts] [3036] young man in a check suit came in and sat at a table close by.
[Counterparts] [3062] it was agreed to have a trial of strength. The table was cleared and
[Counterparts] [3065] on to the table. Farrington looked very serious and determined.
[Counterparts] [3068] opponent's hand slowly down on to the table. Farrington's dark
[Counterparts] [3083] on to the table. There was a murmur of applause from the
[Counterparts] [3084] spectators. The curate, who was standing beside the table, nodded
[Counterparts] [3147] lamp was lit he banged his fist on the table and shouted:
[Counterparts] [3164] The little boy cried "O, pa!" and ran whimpering round the table,
[Clay] [3254] with their mugs on the table, and said she was sorry she hadn't a
[Clay] [3378] table and then led the children up to the table, blindfold. One got
[Clay] [3382] insisted then on blindfolding Maria and leading her up to the table
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[A Painful Case] [3446] fender and irons and a square table on which lay a double desk. A
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3920] table. A denuded room came into view and the fire lost all its
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3922] of an election address. In the middle of the room was a small table
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4187] Mr. Henchy returned with the candlestick and put it on the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4281] to the table and counted the full tally. After the transfer the boy put
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4331] put the bottle back on the table and wiped his mouth with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4385] He took two bottles from the table and, carrying them to the fire,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4388] table, pushed his hat towards the nape of his neck and began to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4405] out of Mr. Lyons' bottle. Mr. Lyons jumped off the table, went to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4406] the fire, took his bottle and carried it back to the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4498] Mr. Hynes sat on the side of the table near Mr. Lyons but said
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4523] off his hat, laid it on the table and stood up. He seemed to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4581] Mr. Hynes sat down again on the table. When he had finished his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4587] remained sitting flushed and bare-headed on the table. He did not
[Grace] [5286] battalion of canisters was drawn up and on the table before the
[Grace] [5588] before him on the table and a bloody big spoon like a shovel. He
[Grace] [5610] Mrs. Kernan entered the room and, placing a tray on the table,
[Grace] [5632] the table and paused. Then Mr. Cunningham turned towards Mr.
[Grace] [5853] He inquired politely for Mr. Kernan, placed his gift on the table
[The Dead] [6588] Julia, who was carrying in a column of table-napkins, turned to her
[The Dead] [6852] over so that we'll have the table to ourselves."
[The Dead] [6899] would be there than at the supper-table!
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6934] from the invisible supper-table. It sounded so genuine that a little
[The Dead] [7079] A fat brown goose lay at one end of the table and at the other end,
[The Dead] [7091] celery stalks. In the centre of the table there stood, as sentries to a
[The Dead] [7101] Gabriel took his seat boldly at the head of the table and, having
[The Dead] [7105] table.
[The Dead] [7133] the table, walking on each other's heels, getting in each other's way
[The Dead] [7153] which the table covered Lily's removal of the plates. The subject of
[The Dead] [7163] table.
[The Dead] [7171] Browne familiarly to the table.
[The Dead] [7176] Nobody answered this question and Mary Jane led the table back
[The Dead] [7227] table. The clatter of forks and spoons began again. Gabriel's wife
[The Dead] [7229] the table. Midway down they were held up by Mary Jane, who
[The Dead] [7244] son was going down to Mount Melleray in a week or so. The table
[The Dead] [7280] the table during which Mrs. Malins could be heard saying to her
[The Dead] [7286] chocolates and sweets were now passed about the table and Aunt
[The Dead] [7294] coughed once or twice and then a few gentlemen patted the table
[The Dead] [7350] A hearty murmur of assent ran round the table. It shot through
[The Dead] [7393] The table burst into applause and laughter at this allusion. Aunt
[The Dead] [7879] set his unstable candle down on a toilet-table and asked at what