Dubliners by James Joyce
that

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 661 occurrences of the word:   that

[The Sisters] [8] darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head
[The Sisters] [47] I knew that I was under observation so I continued eating as if the
[The Sisters] [55] Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady
[The Sisters] [61] say to a man like that."
[The Sisters] [70] corner. That's what I'm always saying to that Rosicrucian there:
[The Sisters] [74] pick of that leg mutton," he added to my aunt.
[The Sisters] [84] impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it
[The Sisters] [93] that I saw again the heavy grey face of the paralytic. I drew the
[The Sisters] [95] face still followed me. It murmured, and I understood that it
[The Sisters] [100] moist with spittle. But then I remembered that it had died of
[The Sisters] [101] paralysis and I felt that I too was smiling feebly as if to absolve the
[The Sisters] [119] The reading of the card persuaded me that he was dead and I was
[The Sisters] [139] went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [157] surprised when he told me that the fathers of the Church had
[The Sisters] [173] remembered that I had noticed long velvet curtains and a swinging
[The Sisters] [174] lamp of antique fashion. I felt that I had been very far away, in
[The Sisters] [180] that looked to the west reflected the tawny gold of a great bank of
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [198] trodden down all to one side. The fancy came to me that the old
[The Sisters] [202] that he was not smiling. There he lay, solemn and copious, vested
[The Sisters] [246] just looked as if he was asleep, he looked that peaceful and
[The Sisters] [254] know that you did all you could for him. You were both very kind
[The Sisters] [275] "Wasn't that good of him?" said my aunt
[The Sisters] [280] said and done, no friends that a body can trust."
[The Sisters] [282] "Indeed, that's true," said my aunt. "And I'm sure now that he's
[The Sisters] [288] he's gone and all to that...."
[The Sisters] [290] "It's when it's all over that you'll miss him," said my aunt.
[The Sisters] [292] "I know that," said Eliza. "I won't be bringing him in his cup of
[The Sisters] [306] "But still and all he kept on saying that before the summer was
[The Sisters] [310] carriages that makes no noise that Father O'Rourke told him about,
[The Sisters] [313] together of a Sunday evening. He had his mind set on that.... Poor
[The Sisters] [327] that."
[The Sisters] [335] "It was that chalice he broke.... That was the beginning of it. Of
[The Sisters] [336] course, they say it was all right, that it contained nothing, I mean.
[The Sisters] [340] "And was that it?" said my aunt. "I heard something...."
[The Sisters] [344] "That affected his mind," she said. "After that he began to mope by
[The Sisters] [350] and the clerk and Father O'Rourke and another priest that was
[The Sisters] [356] no sound in the house: and I knew that the old priest was lying still
[The Sisters] [363] when they saw that, that made them think that there was something
[An Encounter] [385] Everyone was incredulous when it was reported that he had a
[An Encounter] [449] That night I slept badly. In the morning I was firstcomer to the
[An Encounter] [485] at us, he proposed that we should charge them. I objected that the
[An Encounter] [487] screaming after us: "Swaddlers! Swaddlers!" thinking that we were
[An Encounter] [517] observed from the other quay. Some bystander said that she was a
[An Encounter] [558] We followed him with our eyes and saw that when he had gone on
[An Encounter] [561] ground with his stick, so slowly that I thought he was looking for
[An Encounter] [566] with great care. He began to talk of the weather, saying that it
[An Encounter] [567] would be a very hot summer and adding that the seasons had
[An Encounter] [568] changed gready since he was a boy--a long time ago. He said that
[An Encounter] [570] days and that he would give anything to be young again. While he
[An Encounter] [574] Walter Scott and Lord Lytton. I pretended that I had read every
[An Encounter] [575] book he mentioned so that in the end he said:
[An Encounter] [587] saw that he had great gaps in his mouth between his yellow teeth.
[An Encounter] [589] mentioned lightly that he had three totties. The man asked me how
[An Encounter] [590] many I had. I answered that I had none. He did not believe me and
[An Encounter] [596] The man smiled as before and said that when he was our age he
[An Encounter] [602] his age. In my heart I thought that what he said about boys and
[An Encounter] [605] something or felt a sudden chill. As he proceeded I noticed that his
[An Encounter] [611] gave me the impression that he was repeating something which he
[An Encounter] [612] had learned by heart or that, magnetised by some words of his own
[An Encounter] [615] that everybody knew, and at times he lowered his voice and spoke
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [650] was going to reply indignantly that we were not National School
[An Encounter] [654] round its new centre. He said that when boys were that kind they
[An Encounter] [664] his recent liberalism. He said that if ever he found a boy talking to
[An Encounter] [666] him; and that would teach him not to be talking to girls. And if a
[An Encounter] [669] that there was nothing in this world he would like so well as that.
[An Encounter] [671] unfolding some elaborate mystery. He would love that, he said,
[An Encounter] [674] seemed to plead with me that I should understand him.
[An Encounter] [678] pretending to fix my shoe properly and then, saying that I was
[An Encounter] [680] my heart was beating quickly with fear that he would seize me by
[Araby] [741] that I could not be seen. When she came out on the doorstep my
[Araby] [757] converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I
[Araby] [773] me. I was thankful that I could see so little. All my senses seemed
[Araby] [774] to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Araby] [787] that week in her convent. Her brother and two other boys were
[Araby] [791] her hair that rested there and, falling, lit up the hand upon the
[Araby] [800] thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious
[Araby] [811] serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my
[Araby] [814] On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to
[Araby] [879] saying that it was a special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in
[Araby] [882] by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten. In front
[Araby] [885] I could not find any sixpenny entrance and, fearing that the bazaar
[Araby] [890] a silence like that which pervades a church after a service. I
[Araby] [909] "Didn't she say that?"
[Araby] [918] humbly at the great jars that stood like eastern guards at either side
[Araby] [932] voice call from one end of the gallery that the light was out. The
[Eveline] [951] roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field
[Eveline] [958] besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and
[Eveline] [978] She had consented to go away, to leave her home. Was that wise?
[Eveline] [983] when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she
[Eveline] [995] be like that. Then she would be married--she, Eveline. People
[Eveline] [999] it was that that had given her the palpitations. When they were
[Eveline] [1010] squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to
[Eveline] [1018] work to keep the house together and to see that the two young
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1036] People knew that they were courting and, when he sang about the
[Eveline] [1037] lass that loves a sailor, she always felt pleasantly confused. He
[Eveline] [1052] One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to
[Eveline] [1069] organ playing. She knew the air Strange that it should come that
[Eveline] [1081] the very quick of her being--that life of commonplace sacrifices
[Eveline] [1094] Wall. He held her hand and she knew that he was speaking to her,
[After the Race] [1177] Cambridge that he had met Segouin. They were not much more
[After the Race] [1198] Jimmy's excitement. He had been seen by many of his friends that
[After the Race] [1203] after that honour to return to the profane world of spectators amid
[After the Race] [1216] managed to give the impression that it was by a favour of
[After the Race] [1222] air of wealth. Jimmy set out to translate into days' work that lordly
[After the Race] [1234] that evening in Segouin's hotel and, meanwhile, Jimmy and his
[After the Race] [1280] That night the city wore the mask of a capital. The five young men
[After the Race] [1335] did not know exactly who was winning but he knew that he was
[After the Race] [1344] luck. Jimmy understood that the game lay between Routh and
[After the Race] [1352] He knew that he would regret in the morning but at present he was
[After the Race] [1353] glad of the rest, glad of the dark stupor that would cover up his
[Two Gallants] [1389] When he was quite sure that the narrative had ended he laughed
[Two Gallants] [1392] "Well!... That takes the biscuit!"
[Two Gallants] [1397] "That takes the solitary, unique, and, if I may so call it, recherche
[Two Gallants] [1421] round her and squeezed her a bit that night. Then next Sunday,
[Two Gallants] [1426] two bloody fine cigars--O, the real cheese, you know, that the old
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1438] "Of all the good ones ever I heard," he said, "that emphatically
[Two Gallants] [1475] "Is she game for that?" asked Lenehan dubiously. "You can never
[Two Gallants] [1496] at the theatre or buy them chocolate and sweets or something that
[Two Gallants] [1502] "I know that game," he said, "and it's a mug's game."
[Two Gallants] [1552] that point. Eh? ... What?"
[Two Gallants] [1561] temper, to be sent to the devil and told that his advice was not
[Two Gallants] [1573] His harp, too, heedless that her coverings had fallen about her
[Two Gallants] [1657] Now that he was alone his face looked older. His gaiety seemed to
[Two Gallants] [1667] that was meant to charm him and did not answer the glances which
[Two Gallants] [1668] invited him to be bold. He knew that he would have to speak a
[Two Gallants] [1703] ate his food greedily and found it so good that he made a note of
[Two Gallants] [1727] and stopped to converse with them. He was glad that he could rest
[Two Gallants] [1729] what was the latest. He replied that he had spent the day with
[Two Gallants] [1732] One said that he had seen Mac an hour before in Westmoreland
[Two Gallants] [1733] Street. At this Lenehan said that he had been with Mac the night
[Two Gallants] [1735] Westmoreland Street asked was it true that Mac had won a bit over
[Two Gallants] [1736] a billiard match. Lenehan did not know: he said that Holohan had
[Two Gallants] [1758] that perhaps Corley had seen her home by another way and given
[Two Gallants] [1761] the College of Surgeons. Would Corley do a thing like that? He lit
[Two Gallants] [1789] house which the young woman had entered to see that he was not
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1859] always sure to be on to a good thing-that is to say, a likely horse or
[The Boarding House] [1881] feel that there is a young woman not very far away. Polly, of
[The Boarding House] [1883] shrewd judge, knew that the young men were only passing the time
[The Boarding House] [1886] typewriting when she noticed that something was going on
[The Boarding House] [1890] Polly knew that she was being watched, but still her mother's
[The Boarding House] [1921] awkward not merely because allusions of that kind always made
[The Boarding House] [1922] her awkward but also because she did not wish it to be thought that
[The Boarding House] [1928] that the bells of George's Church had stopped ringing. It was
[The Boarding House] [1934] assuming that he was a man of honour and he had simply abused
[The Boarding House] [1936] that youth could not be pleaded as his excuse; nor could ignorance
[The Boarding House] [1939] inexperience: that was evident. The question was: What reparation
[The Boarding House] [1951] room to say that she wished to speak with him. She felt sure she
[The Boarding House] [1969] made two attempts to shave but his hand had been so unsteady that
[The Boarding House] [1972] so that he had to take them off and polish them with his
[The Boarding House] [1976] magnified his sin that he was almost thankful at being afforded a
[The Boarding House] [1988] existence of God to his companions in public- houses. But that was
[The Boarding House] [1992] money enough to settle down on; it was not that. But the family
[The Boarding House] [1995] certain fame. He had a notion that he was being had. He could
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2007] her mother would speak with him that morning. She cried and
[The Boarding House] [2014] He comforted her feebly, telling her not to cry, that it would be all
[The Boarding House] [2018] It was not altogether his fault that it had happened. He
[The Boarding House] [2043] back. But the sin was there; even his sense of honour told him that
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[The Boarding House] [2054] moisture that he had to take them off and polish them. He longed
[The Boarding House] [2070] little paler than usual, kept smiling and saying that there was no
[The Boarding House] [2071] harm meant: but Jack kept shouting at him that if any fellow tried
[The Boarding House] [2072] that sort of a game on with his sister he'd bloody well put his teeth
[The Boarding House] [2088] future. Her hopes and visions were so intricate that she no longer
[The Boarding House] [2090] that she was waiting for anything.
[A Little Cloud] [2106] and wished him godspeed. Gallaher had got on. You could tell that
[A Little Cloud] [2111] friend like that.
[A Little Cloud] [2155] through all that minute vermin-like life and under the shadow of
[A Little Cloud] [2161] He knew that people went there after the theatre to eat oysters and
[A Little Cloud] [2162] drink liqueurs; and he had heard that the waiters there spoke
[A Little Cloud] [2173] as he walked boldly forward, the silence that was spread about his
[A Little Cloud] [2180] before? Still, now that he reviewed the past, Little Chandler could
[A Little Cloud] [2182] to say that Ignatius Gallaher was wild Of course, he did mix with a
[A Little Cloud] [2183] rakish set of fellows at that time. drank freely and borrowed
[A Little Cloud] [2185] affair, some money transaction: at least, that was one version of his
[A Little Cloud] [2187] something in Ignatius Gallaher that impressed you in spite of
[A Little Cloud] [2196] That was Ignatius Gallaher all out; and, damn it, you couldn't but
[A Little Cloud] [2213] thought that a poetic moment had touched him took life within
[A Little Cloud] [2220] different moods and impressions that he wished to express in
[A Little Cloud] [2226] He would never be popular: he saw that. He could not sway the
[A Little Cloud] [2230] that, he would put in allusions. He began to invent sentences and
[A Little Cloud] [2239] He pursued his revery so ardently that he passed his street and had
[A Little Cloud] [2247] to be full of people and he felt that the people were observing him
[A Little Cloud] [2250] he saw that nobody had turned to look at him: and there, sure
[A Little Cloud] [2310] very same serious person that used to lecture me on Sunday
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2387] Tommy, don't make punch of that whisky: liquor up."
[A Little Cloud] [2443] know that?"
[A Little Cloud] [2445] "I know that," said Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2475] little card-party. Only for that..."
[A Little Cloud] [2477] "O, in that case..."
[A Little Cloud] [2480] I may take a little skip over here now that I've broken the ice. It's
[A Little Cloud] [2513] inferior in birth and education. He was sure that he could do
[A Little Cloud] [2516] chance. What was it that stood in his way? His unfortunate timidity
[A Little Cloud] [2533] "No blooming fear of that, my boy. I'm going to have my fling first
[A Little Cloud] [2547] He had slightly emphasised his tone and he was aware that he had
[A Little Cloud] [2598] nervousness it had cost him! How he had suffered that day, waiting
[A Little Cloud] [2632] it published, that might open the way for him.
[A Little Cloud] [2647] How melancholy it was! Could he, too, write like that, express the
[A Little Cloud] [2650] Bridge, for example. If he could get back again into that mood....
[A Little Cloud] [2659] That clay where once...
[Counterparts] [2744] that contract between Bodley and Kirwan? I told you it must be
[Counterparts] [2751] another for shirking work. Let me tell you that if the contract is not
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2770] that he must have a good night's drinking. The middle of the month
[Counterparts] [2775] he had been unaware of the man's presence till that moment, he
[Counterparts] [2787] the room, he heard Mr. Alleyne cry after him that if the contract
[Counterparts] [2795] then he could write. He felt that he must slake the thirst in his
[Counterparts] [2810] that looked into the bar with his inflamed face, the colour of dark
[Counterparts] [2833] counter as if to intimate that their presence prevented him from
[Counterparts] [2837] "I know that game," he said. "Five times in one day is a little bit...
[Counterparts] [2849] discover that the last two letters were missing.
[Counterparts] [2867] the said Bernard Bodley be... and thought how strange it was that
[Counterparts] [2877] something violently. He was so enraged that he wrote Bernard
[Counterparts] [2889] His imagination had so abstracted him that his name was called
[Counterparts] [2893] Alleyne began a tirade of abuse, saying that two letters were
[Counterparts] [2894] missing. The man answered that he knew nothing about them, that
[Counterparts] [2896] and violent that the man could hardly restrain his fist from
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2933] that his position was bad enough. He had been obliged to offer an
[Counterparts] [2944] North of Ireland accent to amuse Higgins and Miss Parker: that
[Counterparts] [2956] pawn-office in Fleet Street. That was the dart! Why didn't he think
[Counterparts] [2960] muttering to himself that they could all go to hell because he was
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [2987] the eclogues, he had to admit that it was not as clever as
[Counterparts] [2989] that and have another.
[Counterparts] [3002] When that round was over there was a pause. O'Halloran had
[Counterparts] [3019] Farrington stood another round, Weathers protesting that the
[Counterparts] [3021] scenes and introduce them to some nice girls. O'Halloran said that
[Counterparts] [3022] he and Leonard would go, but that Farrington wouldn't go because
[Counterparts] [3024] the company in token that he understood he was being chaffed.
[Counterparts] [3037] Weathers saluted them and told the company that they were out of
[Counterparts] [3049] London accent. He watched her leave the room in the hope that she
[Counterparts] [3053] there was one thing that he hated it was a sponge. He was so angry
[Counterparts] [3054] that he lost count of the conversation of his friends.
[Counterparts] [3056] When Paddy Leonard called him he found that they were talking
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Counterparts] [3125] "Who is that?" said the man, peering through the darkness.
[Counterparts] [3155] "On that fire! You let the fire out! By God, I'll teach you to do that
[Counterparts] [3170] him vigorously with the stick. "Take that, you little whelp!"
[Clay] [3188] that they had been cut into long thick even slices and were ready to
[Clay] [3210] the words A Present from Belfast. She was very fond of that purse
[Clay] [3215] would have, all the children singing! Only she hoped that Joe
[Clay] [3227] After the break-up at home the boys had got her that position in the
[Clay] [3235] one thing she didn't like and that was the tracts on the walks; but
[Clay] [3246] that every woman got her four slices. There was a great deal of
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3257] nearly shook itself asunder because she knew that Mooney meant
[Clay] [3262] She went into her little bedroom and, remembering that the next
[Clay] [3287] was so full of people that it was a long time before she could get
[Clay] [3298] That made Maria blush and smile at the young lady; but the young
[Clay] [3313] said it was only right that the youngsters should enjoy themselves
[Clay] [3340] Mrs. Donnelly said it was plain that Maria had left it behind her in
[Clay] [3348] was very nice with her. He told her all that went on in his office,
[Clay] [3351] the answer he had made but she said that the manager must have
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3362] prefer that. Maria said she would rather they didn't ask her to take
[Clay] [3367] Alphy. But Joe cried that God might strike him stone dead if ever
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3371] blood but Joe said that Alphy was no brother of his and there was
[Clay] [3391] surprised that nobody spoke or took off her bandage. There was a
[Clay] [3395] next-door girls and told her to throw it out at once: that was no
[Clay] [3396] play. Maria understood that it was wrong that time and so she had
[Clay] [3399] After that Mrs. Donnelly played Miss McCloud's Reel for the
[Clay] [3404] that night, so full of pleasant talk and reminiscences. She said they
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3417] I dreamt that I dwelt in marble halls
[Clay] [3420] That I was the hope and the pride.
[Clay] [3425] That you loved me still the same.
[Clay] [3429] her song Joe was very much moved. He said that there was no time
[Clay] [3432] with tears that he could not find what he was looking for and in the
[A Painful Case] [3499] regulate the civic life. He allowed himself to think that in certain
[A Painful Case] [3511] He took the remark as an invitation to talk. He was surprised that
[A Painful Case] [3513] permanently in his memory. When he learned that the young girl
[A Painful Case] [3538] underhand ways and, finding that they were compelled to meet
[A Painful Case] [3540] encouraged his visits, thinking that his daughter's hand was in
[A Painful Case] [3542] of pleasures that he did not suspect that anyone else would take an
[A Painful Case] [3553] nature open to the full: she became his confessor. He told her that
[A Painful Case] [3560] they took in the question of wages was inordinate. He felt that they
[A Painful Case] [3561] were hard-featured realists and that they resented an exactitude
[A Painful Case] [3577] room, their isolation, the music that still vibrated in their ears
[A Painful Case] [3581] that in her eyes he would ascend to an angelical stature; and, as he
[A Painful Case] [3586] these discourses was that one night during which she had shown
[A Painful Case] [3599] towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that,
[A Painful Case] [3652] Parade Station yesterday evening. The evidence showed that the
[A Painful Case] [3658] James Lennon, driver of the engine, stated that he had been in the
[A Painful Case] [3664] P. Dunne, railway porter, stated that as the train was about to start
[A Painful Case] [3673] Police Sergeant Croly deposed that when he arrived he found the
[A Painful Case] [3680] stated that the deceased had two lower ribs fractured and had
[A Painful Case] [3697] deceased, also gave evidence. He stated that the deceased was his
[A Painful Case] [3699] arrived only that morning from Rotterdam. They had been married
[A Painful Case] [3703] Miss Mary Sinico said that of late her mother had been in the habit
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[A Painful Case] [3735] reared. But that she could have sunk so low! Was it possible he
[A Painful Case] [3737] outburst of that night and interpreted it in a harsher sense than he
[A Painful Case] [3763] realised that she was dead, that she had ceased to exist, that she
[A Painful Case] [3768] blame? Now that she was gone he understood how lonely her life
[A Painful Case] [3769] must have been, sitting night after night alone in that room. His
[A Painful Case] [3787] with despair. He gnawed the rectitude of his life; he felt that he
[A Painful Case] [3790] sentenced her to ignominy, a death of shame. He knew that the
[A Painful Case] [3806] again: perfectly silent. He felt that he was alone.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3877] up with this and that...."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3883] I've a sup taken. What's the world coming to when sons speaks that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3902] "Who's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3906] "Is that you, Hynes?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3953] anyone else--ay, and a better right than those shoneens that are
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3955] Isn't that so, Mat?" said Mr. Hynes, addressing Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3972] "How's that?" said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4057] "But is that a fact?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4059] "God, yes," said Mr. Henchy. "Did you never hear that? And the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4063] you mind now? That's that. That's where he first saw the light."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4095] Mr. Henchy snuffled vigorously and spat so copiously that he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4118] He's a clever chap, too, with the pen. Do you remember that thing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4130] above that.... But there's a certain little nobleman with a cock-eye
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4157] that you? Come in!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4221] "I asked that little shoeboy three times," said Mr. Henchy, "would
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4229] Cowley. I just waited till I caught his eye, and said: 'About that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4234] "There's some deal on in that quarter," said Mr. O'Connor
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4267] sending out for a pound of chops for his dinner? How's that for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4306] "O, don't let that trouble you, Jack," said Mr. Henchy. "Many's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4347] "That so, John?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4372] "Is that the way you chaps canvass," said Mr. Lyons, "and Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4397] sufficient in itself, was that he had nothing to say; the second
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4398] reason was that he considered his companions beneath him. He
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4408] "I was just telling them, Crofton," said Mr. Henchy, that we got a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4445] comes over here on a friendly visit? Eh? Isn't that right, Crofton?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4469] stir up any bad blood. We all respect him now that he's dead and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4479] only man that could keep that bag of cats in order. 'Down, ye dogs!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4501] "There's one of them, anyhow," said Mr. Henchy, "that didn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4505] "0, Joe," said Mr. O'Connor suddenly. "Give us that thing you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4508] "0, ay!" said Mr. Henchy. "Give us that. Did you ever hear that.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4516] "O, that thing is it.... Sure, that's old now."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4553] To clutch that idol, treachery
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4556] That smote their Lord or with a kiss
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4575] The day that brings us Freedom's reign.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4576] And on that day may Erin well
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4593] "What do you think of that, Crofton?" cried Mr. Henchy. "Isn't that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4596] Crofton said that it was a very fine piece of writing.
[A Mother] [4624] of married life, Mrs. Kearney perceived that such a man would
[A Mother] [4656] often on people's lips. People said that she was very clever at
[A Mother] [4657] music and a very nice girl and, moreover, that she was a believer
[A Mother] [4660] to her and proposed that her daughter should be the accompanist at
[A Mother] [4673] knew that the first tenor would not like to come on after Mr.
[A Mother] [4692] nothing, and, thanks to her, everything that was to be done was
[A Mother] [4708] that he wore his soft brown hat carelessly on the side of his head
[A Mother] [4709] and that his accent was flat. He held a programme in his hand, and,
[A Mother] [4729] what it meant. He said that the committee had made a mistake in
[A Mother] [4735] Mr. Holohan admitted that the artistes were no good but the
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [4748] Kearney saw at once that the house was filled with paper. The
[A Mother] [4751] quite unconscious that Mrs. Kearney was taking angry note of his
[A Mother] [4755] learned that the Friday concert was to be abandoned and that the
[A Mother] [4762] "But, of course, that doesn't alter the contract," she said. "The
[A Mother] [4767] She called Mr. Fitzpatrick away from his screen and told him that
[A Mother] [4768] her daughter had signed for four concerts and that, of course,
[A Mother] [4772] quickly, seemed unable to resolve the difficulty and said that he
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4788] carefully and said that perhaps it would be better if he went with
[A Mother] [4793] She was glad that he had suggested coming with her. She thought
[A Mother] [4805] to whom Mrs. Kearney explained that she wanted to see one of the
[A Mother] [4834] spoke little. He said yous so softly that it passed unnoticed and he
[A Mother] [4861] that she was Madam Glynn, the soprano.
[A Mother] [4867] dressing-room at that moment and the two young ladies asked him
[A Mother] [4868] who was the unknown woman. Mr. Holohan said that she was
[A Mother] [4888] said that Mr. Fitzpatrick had charge of that. Mrs. Kearney said that
[A Mother] [4891] Mr. Holohan said that it wasn't his business.
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4908] O'Madden Burke. The Freeman man had come in to say that he
[A Mother] [4912] would see that it went in. He was a grey-haired man, with a
[A Mother] [4921] conscious that the bosom which he saw rise and fall slowly
[A Mother] [4922] beneath him rose and fell at that moment for him, that the laughter
[A Mother] [4946] Kearney was speaking so animatedly to her husband that he had to
[A Mother] [4956] audience would think that he had come late.
[A Mother] [4981] The baritone had not seen her but he had been told that she was
[A Mother] [5020] in Dublin after that, he said. The baritone was asked what did he
[A Mother] [5023] However, he said that Mrs. Kearney might have taken the artistes
[A Mother] [5032] patriotic piece. Mrs. Kearney said that the Committee had treated
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5039] that if she had been a man. But she would see that her daughter got
[A Mother] [5050] Holohan went over to Mrs. Kearney and told her that the other four
[A Mother] [5052] following Tuesday and that, in case her daughter did not play for
[A Mother] [5058] hand or a foot she won't put on that platform."
[A Mother] [5083] After that Mrs. Kearney's conduct was condemned on all hands:
[A Mother] [5087] the second part to begin in the hope that the secretaries would
[Grace] [5230] to inspect the scene of the accident. They agreed that the
[Grace] [5247] his gratitude to the young man and regretted that they could not
[Grace] [5295] was mitigated by the fact that certain of those friends who had
[Grace] [5313] Mr. Power was careful to explain to her that he was not
[Grace] [5314] responsible, that he had come on the scene by the merest accident.
[Grace] [5319] "O, you needn't tell me that, Mr. Power. I know you're a friend of
[Grace] [5327] "I'm so sorry," she continued, "that I've nothing in the house to
[Grace] [5386] since the boys had grown up, and she knew that he would walk to
[Grace] [5400] He was quite unconscious that he was the victim of a plot which
[Grace] [5411] happy. People had great sympathy with him, for it was known that
[Grace] [5421] informed. His friends bowed to his opinions and considered that
[Grace] [5429] illusions left. Religion for her was a habit, and she suspected that a
[Grace] [5432] and, but that she did not wish to seem bloody-minded, would have
[Grace] [5433] told the gentlemen that Mr. Kernan's tongue would not suffer by
[Grace] [5443] that he had once known a similar case. A man of seventy had
[Grace] [5445] tongue had filled in again, so that no one could see a trace of the
[Grace] [5484] "Ah, well, all's well that ends well."
[Grace] [5503] When Mr. Cunningham made that remark, people were silent. It
[Grace] [5504] was known that the speaker had secret sources of information. In
[Grace] [5524] his friends to think there had been some mistake, that Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5529] "All's well that ends well."
[Grace] [5533] "That was a decent young chap, that medical fellow," he said.
[Grace] [5543] "It happened that you were peloothered, Tom," said Mr.
[Grace] [5551] straight-laced, but he could not forget that Mr. M'Coy had recently
[Grace] [5554] than he resented the fact that he had been victimised he resented
[Grace] [5577] conversation by any door, pretended that he had never heard the
[Grace] [5628] He assumed such a comical face and voice that the distribution of
[Grace] [5659] that we're arranging about for Thursday."
[Grace] [5697] to his mind, but, understanding that some spiritual agencies were
[Grace] [5721] "Is that so?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5775] "Father Tom Burke, that was the boy!"
[Grace] [5777] "O, Father Tom Burke," said Mr. Cunningham, "that was a born
[Grace] [5786] "Is that so?" said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5813] "There's a good deal in that," said Mr. Power. "There used always
[Grace] [5855] appreciated the gift all the more since he was aware that there was
[Grace] [5859] "I wouldn't doubt you, old man. Open that, Jack, will you?"
[Grace] [5868] Greek Churches. That was the aim of his life."
[Grace] [5883] that is, Cross upon Cross--to show the difference between their
[Grace] [5894] "Is that so?" said Mr. Fogarty.
[Grace] [5901] "We didn't learn that, Tom," said Mr. Power, following Mr.
[Grace] [5915] "I remember reading," said Mr. Cunningham, "that one of Pope
[Grace] [5946] word of false doctrine. Now isn't that an astonishing thing?"
[Grace] [5948] "That is," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5956] younger then.... Or was it that----?"
[Grace] [5959] others to a little more. Mr. M'Coy, seeing that there was not
[Grace] [5960] enough to go round, pleaded that he had not finished his first
[Grace] [5964] "What's that you were saying, Tom?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5966] "Papal infallibility," said Mr. Cunningham, "that was the greatest
[Grace] [5969] "How was that, Martin?" asked Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5991] "Are you sure of that now?" asked Mr. Fogarty dubiously. "I
[Grace] [6008] "Credo!" said Mr. Cunningham "That showed the faith he had. He
[Grace] [6027] "I often told you that?"
[Grace] [6061] "I pity the poor priest that has to listen to your tale."
[Grace] [6091] confession, and... all that business. But... no candles! No, damn it
[Grace] [6096] "Listen to that!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6169] of the mammon of iniquity so that when you die they may receive
[Grace] [6178] the life of the world and who yet wished to lead that life not in the
[Grace] [6181] every cranny of our human nature, understood that all men were
[Grace] [6182] not called to the religious life, that by far the vast majority were
[Grace] [6189] He told his hearers that he was there that evening for no terrifying,
[Grace] [6202] hearers. And that was: to be straight and manly with God. If their
[The Dead] [6222] Miss Julia had thought of that and had converted the bathroom
[The Dead] [6231] pupils that were grown up enough, and even some of Mary Jane's
[The Dead] [6238] corn-factor on the ground floor. That was a good thirty years ago if
[The Dead] [6252] seldom made a mistake in the orders, so that she got on well with
[The Dead] [6253] her three mistresses. They were fussy, that was all. But the only
[The Dead] [6258] Gabriel and his wife. Besides they were dreadfully afraid that
[The Dead] [6260] worlds that any of Mary Jane's pupils should see him under the
[The Dead] [6261] influence; and when he was like that it was sometimes very hard to
[The Dead] [6263] what could be keeping Gabriel: and that was what brought them
[The Dead] [6271] "I'll engage they did," said Gabriel, "but they forget that my wife
[The Dead] [6321] "The men that is now is only all palaver and what they can get out
[The Dead] [6352] The girl, seeing that he had gained the stairs, called out after him:
[The Dead] [6357] finish, listening to the skirts that swept against it and to the
[The Dead] [6364] his hearers. Some quotation that they would recognise from
[The Dead] [6367] reminded him that their grade of culture differed from his. He
[The Dead] [6369] which they could not understand. They would think that he was
[The Dead] [6395] that last year, hadn't we? Don't you remember, Aunt Kate, what a
[The Dead] [6462] girl like that, one you can depend on! There's that Lily, I'm sure I
[The Dead] [6479] pianist told that the waltz had ended. The drawing-room door was
[The Dead] [6491] "It's such a relief," said Aunt Kate to Mrs. Conroy, "that Gabriel is
[The Dead] [6509] He did not finish his sentence, but, seeing that Aunt Kate was out
[The Dead] [6545] had assumed a very low Dublin accent so that the young ladies,
[The Dead] [6549] that he was ignored, turned promptly to the two young men who
[The Dead] [6609] voice and then, seeing that Mr. Browne was grinning at him from
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6668] mulberry buttons. It was strange that his mother had had no
[The Dead] [6681] spoken of Gretta as being country cute and that was not true of
[The Dead] [6685] He knew that Mary Jane must be near the end of her piece for she
[The Dead] [6717] "O, innocent Amy! I have found out that you write for The Daily
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6726] A look of perplexity appeared on Gabriel's face. It was true that he
[The Dead] [6728] for which he was paid fifteen shillings. But that did not make him
[The Dead] [6736] meet her charge. He wanted to say that literature was above
[The Dead] [6741] lamely that he saw nothing political in writing reviews of books.
[The Dead] [6751] her his review of Browning's poems. That was how she had found
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6797] "that you know nothing of, your own people, and your own
[The Dead] [6827] like her son's and she stuttered slightly. She had been told that
[The Dead] [6828] Freddy had come and that he was nearly all right. Gabriel asked
[The Dead] [6831] year. She answered placidly that she had had a beautiful crossing
[The Dead] [6832] and that the captain had been most attentive to her. She spoke also
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6852] over so that we'll have the table to ourselves."
[The Dead] [6861] "Something like that. I'm trying to get that Mr. D'Arcy to sing. He's
[The Dead] [6886] Gabriel hardly heard what she said. Now that supper was coming
[The Dead] [6904] feels that one is listening to a thought- tormented music." Miss
[The Dead] [6907] been any ill-feeling between them until that night. It unnerved him
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6916] generation that is growing up around us seems to me to lack." Very
[The Dead] [6917] good: that was one for Miss Ivors. What did he care that his aunts
[The Dead] [6926] room, gradually ceased. Gabriel recognised the prelude. It was that
[The Dead] [6934] from the invisible supper-table. It sounded so genuine that a little
[The Dead] [6936] music-stand the old leather-bound songbook that had her initials
[The Dead] [6948] Now! Would you believe that now? That's the truth. Upon my
[The Dead] [6974] "I often told Julia," said Aunt Kate emphatically, "that she was
[The Dead] [6975] simply thrown away in that choir. But she never would be said by
[The Dead] [6983] slaving there in that choir night and day, night and day. Six o'clock
[The Dead] [6993] choirs that have slaved there all their lives and put little
[The Dead] [7000] Jane, seeing that all the dancers had come back, intervened
[The Dead] [7012] were in Julia's place I'd tell that Father Healey straight up to his
[The Dead] [7021] "So that we had better go to supper," said Mary Jane, "and finish
[The Dead] [7030] "But only for ten minutes, Molly," said Mrs. Conroy. "That won't
[The Dead] [7120] but Aunt Kate had said that plain roast goose without any apple
[The Dead] [7123] that they got the best slices and Aunt Kate and Aunt Julia opened
[The Dead] [7130] so that he compromised by taking a long draught of stout for he
[The Dead] [7136] said there was time enough, so that, at last, Freddy Malins stood up
[The Dead] [7180] the old Italian companies that used to come to Dublin--Tietjens,
[The Dead] [7191] Borgia? Because they could not get the voices to sing them: that
[The Dead] [7215] was in his prime and I think he had then the purest tenor voice that
[The Dead] [7232] she received praises for it from all quarters She herself said that it
[The Dead] [7235] "Well, I hope, Miss Morkan," said Mr. Browne, "that I'm brown
[The Dead] [7241] ate it with his pudding. He had been told that celery was a capital
[The Dead] [7243] Malins, who had been silent all through the supper, said that her
[The Dead] [7249] "And do you mean to say," asked Mr. Browne incredulously, "that
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7260] He was astonished to hear that the monks never spoke, got up at
[The Dead] [7268] Aunt Kate repeated that it was the rule, that was all. Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [7270] best he could, that the monks were trying to make up for the sins
[The Dead] [7274] "I like that idea very much but wouldn't a comfortable spring bed
[The Dead] [7307] Wellington Monument wore a gleaming cap of snow that flashed
[The Dead] [7320] "But, however that may be, I can only ask you tonight to take the
[The Dead] [7325] "Ladies and Gentlemen, it is not the first time that we have
[The Dead] [7327] board. It is not the first time that we have been the recipients--or
[The Dead] [7335] "I feel more strongly with every recurring year that our country has
[The Dead] [7337] guard so jealously as that of its hospitality. It is a tradition that is
[The Dead] [7340] perhaps, that with us it is rather a failing than anything to be
[The Dead] [7341] boasted of. But granted even that, it is, to my mind, a princely
[The Dead] [7342] failing, and one that I trust will long be cultivated among us. Of
[The Dead] [7351] Gabriel's mind that Miss Ivors was not there and that she had gone
[The Dead] [7361] and sometimes I fear that this new generation, educated or
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7368] least, that in gatherings such as this we shall still speak of them
[The Dead] [7377] thoughts that will recur to our minds: thoughts of the past, of
[The Dead] [7378] youth, of changes, of absent faces that we miss here tonight. Our
[The Dead] [7404] "I will not attempt to play tonight the part that Paris played on
[The Dead] [7414] Gentlemen, that I do not know to which of them I should award the
[The Dead] [7462] standing so that Aunt Kate said:
[The Dead] [7484] At that moment the hall-door was opened and Mr. Browne came in
[The Dead] [7513] like that. I wouldn't like to face your journey home at this hour."
[The Dead] [7528] "The late lamented Patrick Morkan, our grandfather, that is,"
[The Dead] [7538] mill. That was all very well; but now comes the tragic part about
[The Dead] [7632] He stood still in the gloom of the hall, trying to catch the air that
[The Dead] [7637] painter he would paint her in that attitude. Her blue felt hat would
[The Dead] [7648] wife was standing. Now that the hall-door was closed the voice
[The Dead] [7677] break off like that when we were all in raptures listening to you."
[The Dead] [7683] "O, Mr. D'Arcy," said Aunt Kate, "now that was a great fib to tell."
[The Dead] [7685] "Can't you see that I'm as hoarse as a crow?" said Mr. D'Arcy
[The Dead] [7699] years; and I read this morning in the newspapers that the snow is
[The Dead] [7718] her. At last she turned towards them and Gabriel saw that there was
[The Dead] [7719] colour on her cheeks and that her eyes were shining. A sudden tide
[The Dead] [7722] "Mr. D'Arcy," she said, "what is the name of that song you were
[The Dead] [7737] Seeing that all were ready to start she shepherded them to the door,
[The Dead] [7775] She was walking on before him so lightly and so erect that he
[The Dead] [7778] him so frail that he longed to defend her against something and
[The Dead] [7798] stars moments of their life together, that no one knew of or would
[The Dead] [7804] all their souls' tender fire. In one letter that he had written to her
[The Dead] [7805] then he had said: "Why is it that words like these seem to me so
[The Dead] [7809] Like distant music these words that he had written years before
[The Dead] [7855] happy that she was his, proud of her grace and wifely carriage. But
[The Dead] [7859] closely to his side; and, as they stood at the hotel door, he felt that
[The Dead] [7889] that handsome article, like a good man."
[The Dead] [7898] the street in order that his emotion might calm a little. Then he
[The Dead] [7908] that the words would not pass Gabriel's lips. No, it was not the
[The Dead] [7920] waited again and then, fearing that diffidence was about to
[The Dead] [7927] "You know that poor fellow Malins?" he said quickly.
[The Dead] [7932] Gabriel in a false voice. "He gave me back that sovereign I lent
[The Dead] [7934] from that Browne, because he's not a bad fellow, really."
[The Dead] [7950] "O, at Christmas, when he opened that little Christmas-card shop
[The Dead] [7953] He was in such a fever of rage and desire that he did not hear her
[The Dead] [7966] with his. Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in
[The Dead] [7967] him, and then the yielding mood had come upon her. Now that she
[The Dead] [7985] "O, I am thinking about that song, The Lass of Aughrim."
[The Dead] [7996] "What about the song? Why does that make you cry?"
[The Dead] [8004] "I am thinking about a person long ago who used to sing that
[The Dead] [8019] Michael Furey. He used to sing that song, The Lass of Aughrim.
[The Dead] [8022] Gabriel was silent. He did not wish her to think that he was
[The Dead] [8036] "Perhaps that was why you wanted to go to Galway with that Ivors
[The Dead] [8052] seventeen. Isn't it a terrible thing to die so young as that?"
[The Dead] [8068] lest she might see the shame that burned upon his forehead.
[The Dead] [8076] "I was great with him at that time," she said.
[The Dead] [8086] A vague terror seized Gabriel at this answer, as if, at that hour
[The Dead] [8091] again, for he felt that she would tell him of herself. Her hand was
[The Dead] [8093] to caress it just as he had caressed her first letter to him that spring
[The Dead] [8100] to. He was in decline, they said, or something like that. I never
[The Dead] [8139] from. O, the day I heard that, that he was dead!"
[The Dead] [8156] her deep-drawn breath. So she had had that romance in her life: a
[The Dead] [8162] that time of her first girlish beauty, a strange, friendly pity for her
[The Dead] [8163] entered his soul. He did not like to say even to himself that her
[The Dead] [8164] face was no longer beautiful, but he knew that it was no longer the
[The Dead] [8176] Morkan and his horse. He had caught that haggard look upon her
[The Dead] [8178] Soon, perhaps, he would be sitting in that same drawing-room,
[The Dead] [8182] would cast about in his mind for some words that might console
[The Dead] [8183] her, and would find only lame and useless ones. Yes, yes: that
[The Dead] [8189] that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and
[The Dead] [8191] him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her
[The Dead] [8192] lover's eyes when he had told her that he did not wish to live.
[The Dead] [8194] Generous tears filled Gabriel's eyes. He had never felt like that
[The Dead] [8195] himself towards any woman, but he knew that such a feeling must
[The Dead] [8199] had approached that region where dwell the vast hosts of the dead.