Dubliners by James Joyce
they

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 274 occurrences of the word:   they

[The Sisters] [10] world," and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [336] course, they say it was all right, that it contained nothing, I mean.
[The Sisters] [337] But still.... They say it was the boy's fault. But poor James was so
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [347] anywhere. They looked high up and low down; and still they
[The Sisters] [349] to try the chapel. So then they got the keys and opened the chapel
[The Sisters] [363] when they saw that, that made them think that there was something
[An Encounter] [394] West were remote from my nature but, at least, they opened doors
[An Encounter] [398] their intention was sometimes literary they were circulated secretly
[An Encounter] [428] who remain at home: they must be sought abroad.
[An Encounter] [607] nice soft hair they had and how soft their hands were and how all
[An Encounter] [608] girls were not so good as they seemed to be if one only knew.
[An Encounter] [654] round its new centre. He said that when boys were that kind they
[Araby] [775] from them, I pressed the palms of my hands together until they
[Araby] [924] back to the two young men. They began to talk of the same
[Eveline] [948] they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then
[Eveline] [956] and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to
[Eveline] [982] house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores
[Eveline] [983] when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she
[Eveline] [999] it was that that had given her the palpitations. When they were
[Eveline] [1031] and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. Then they had
[Eveline] [1036] People knew that they were courting and, when he sang about the
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[After the Race] [1140] finished solidly; they had been placed second and third and the
[After the Race] [1148] They were Charles Segouin, the owner of the car; Andre Riviere, a
[After the Race] [1177] Cambridge that he had met Segouin. They were not much more
[After the Race] [1223] car in which he sat. How smoothly it ran. In what style they had
[After the Race] [1229] They drove down Dame Street. The street was busy with unusual
[After the Race] [1237] pushed their way through the knot of gazers. They walked
[After the Race] [1259] candle lamps. They talked volubly and with little reserve. Jimmy,
[After the Race] [1282] They talked loudly and gaily and their cloaks dangled from their
[After the Race] [1294] noisiest, but all the men were excited. They got up on a car,
[After the Race] [1295] squeezing themselves together amid much laughter. They drove by
[After the Race] [1297] bells. They took the train at Westland Row and in a few seconds,
[After the Race] [1298] as it seemed to Jimmy, they were walking out of Kingstown
[After the Race] [1304] mirror at their feet. They proceeded towards it with linked arms,
[After the Race] [1309] They got into a rowboat at the slip and made out for the
[After the Race] [1321] for form's sake. They drank, however: it was Bohemian. They
[After the Race] [1327] jovial fellows! What good company they were!
[After the Race] [1331] after game, flinging themselves boldly into the adventure. They
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1338] devils of fellows but he wished they would stop: it was getting late.
[After the Race] [1343] a terrible game. They stopped just before the end of it to drink for
[After the Race] [1349] bundled together. They began then to gather in what they had won.
[Two Gallants] [1536] As they passed along the railings of Trinity College, Lenehan
[Two Gallants] [1568] They walked along Nassau Street and then turned into Kildare
[Two Gallants] [1580] mournful music following them. When they reached Stephen's
[Two Gallants] [1581] Green they crossed the road. Here the noise of trams, the lights and
[Two Gallants] [1648] towards him and, when they turned to the right, he followed them,
[Two Gallants] [1666] through which he passed they did so morosely. He found trivial all
[Two Gallants] [1730] Corley. His friends talked very little. They looked vacantly after
[Two Gallants] [1763] eyes as each tram stopped at the far corner of the square. They
[Two Gallants] [1769] in their walk. They were walking quickly, the young woman taking
[Two Gallants] [1771] They did not seem to be speaking. An intimation of the result
[Two Gallants] [1775] They turned down Baggot Street and he followed them at once,
[Two Gallants] [1776] taking the other footpath. When they stopped he stopped too. They
[Two Gallants] [1806] They had reached the corner of Ely Place. Still without answering,
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1851] and lodgings (beer or stout at dinner excluded). They shared in
[The Boarding House] [1852] common tastes and occupations and for this reason they were very
[The Boarding House] [1853] chummy with one another. They discussed with one another the
[The Boarding House] [2033] a little tumbler of punch ready for him. Perhaps they could be
[The Boarding House] [2036] They used to go upstairs together on tiptoe, each with a candle,
[The Boarding House] [2037] and on the third landing exchange reluctant goodnights. They used
[The Boarding House] [2060] pantry nursing two bottles of Bass. They saluted coldly; and the
[A Little Cloud] [2152] street. They stood or ran in the roadway or crawled up the steps
[A Little Cloud] [2165] cavaliers, alight and enter quickly. They wore noisy dresses and
[A Little Cloud] [2166] many wraps. Their faces were powdered and they caught up their
[A Little Cloud] [2167] dresses, when they touched earth, like alarmed Atalantas. He had
[A Little Cloud] [2205] pitied the poor stunted houses. They seemed to him a band of
[A Little Cloud] [2291] They clinked glasses and drank the toast.
[A Little Cloud] [2326] "And is it really so beautiful as they say?" asked Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2356] "Everything in Paris is gay," said Ignatius Gallaher. "They believe
[A Little Cloud] [2359] they've a great feeling for the Irish there. When they heard I was
[A Little Cloud] [2360] from Ireland they were ready to eat me, man."
[A Little Cloud] [2364] "Tell me," he said, "is it true that Paris is so... immoral as they
[A Little Cloud] [2372] You know what they are, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2525] "Who knows?" he said, as they lifted their glasses. "When you
[A Little Cloud] [2570] "But I'm in no hurry. They can wait. I don't fancy tying myself up
[A Little Cloud] [2578] arms. To save money they kept no servant but Annie's young sister
[A Little Cloud] [2614] He looked coldly into the eyes of the photograph and they
[A Little Cloud] [2615] answered coldly. Certainly they were pretty and the face itself was
[A Little Cloud] [2618] him. They repelled him and defied him: there was no passion in
[A Little Cloud] [2620] Jewesses. Those dark Oriental eyes, he thought, how full they are
[Counterparts] [2794] was falling and in a few minutes they would be lighting the gas:
[Counterparts] [2942] they had never pulled together from the first, he and Mr. Alleyne,
[Counterparts] [2960] muttering to himself that they could all go to hell because he was
[Counterparts] [2991] Just as they were naming their poisons who should come in but
[Counterparts] [3007] down on the cold streets and, when they reached the Ballast
[Counterparts] [3011] little party at the corner of the counter. They began to exchange
[Counterparts] [3016] had definite notions of what was what, asked the boys would they
[Counterparts] [3029] When the Scotch House closed they went round to Mulligan's.
[Counterparts] [3030] They went into the parlour at the back and O'Halloran ordered
[Counterparts] [3031] small hot specials all round. They were all beginning to feel
[Counterparts] [3034] of bitter this time. Funds were getting low but they had enough to
[Counterparts] [3037] Weathers saluted them and told the company that they were out of
[Counterparts] [3056] When Paddy Leonard called him he found that they were talking
[Counterparts] [3123] They had five children. A little boy came running down the stairs.
[Clay] [3188] that they had been cut into long thick even slices and were ready to
[Clay] [3214] shillings clear after paying tram fare. What a nice evening they
[Clay] [3229] such a bad opinion of Protestants but now she thought they were
[Clay] [3242] their blouses over their red steaming arms. They settled down
[Clay] [3279] She hoped they would have a nice evening. She was sure they
[Clay] [3281] Joe were not speaking. They were always falling out now but when
[Clay] [3282] they were boys together they used to be the best of friends: but
[Clay] [3291] They would be sure to have plenty of apples and nuts. It was hard
[Clay] [3314] while they were young. Maria agreed with him and favoured him
[Clay] [3333] mamma, something they would be sure to like, and she began to
[Clay] [3338] looked as if they did not like to eat cakes if they were to be
[Clay] [3355] the piano for the children and they danced and sang. Then the two
[Clay] [3358] did they expect Maria to crack nuts without a nutcracker. But
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3362] prefer that. Maria said she would rather they didn't ask her to take
[Clay] [3365] So Maria let him have his way and they sat by the fire talking over
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[Clay] [3400] children and Joe made Maria take a glass of wine. Soon they were
[Clay] [3404] that night, so full of pleasant talk and reminiscences. She said they
[A Painful Case] [3497] they died. He performed these two social duties for old dignity's
[A Painful Case] [3512] she seemed so little awkward. While they talked he tried to fix her
[A Painful Case] [3532] and they had one child.
[A Painful Case] [3535] appointment. She came. This was the first of many meetings; they
[A Painful Case] [3538] underhand ways and, finding that they were compelled to meet
[A Painful Case] [3560] they took in the question of wages was inordinate. He felt that they
[A Painful Case] [3561] were hard-featured realists and that they resented an exactitude
[A Painful Case] [3572] He went often to her little cottage outside Dublin; often they spent
[A Painful Case] [3574] they spoke of subjects less remote. Her companionship was like a
[A Painful Case] [3594] confessional they meet in a little cakeshop near the Parkgate. It
[A Painful Case] [3595] was cold autumn weather but in spite of the cold they wandered up
[A Painful Case] [3596] and down the roads of the Park for nearly three hours. They agreed
[A Painful Case] [3598] sorrow. When they came out of the Park they walked in silence
[A Painful Case] [3699] arrived only that morning from Rotterdam. They had been married
[A Painful Case] [3751] value of a gentleman's estate in County Kildare They drank at
[A Painful Case] [3755] them, without seeing or hearing them. After a while they went out
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3858] caretaker. They had been sitting thus since e short day had grown
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3974] "Don't you know they want to present an address of welcome to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4050] "0, he's as tricky as they make 'em," said Mr. Henchy. "He hasn't
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4100] Just go round and try and find out how they're getting on. They
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4514] they were alluding, but, after reflecting a while, he said:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4571] They had their way: they laid him low.
[A Mother] [4634] daughters a dowry of one hundred pounds each when they came to
[A Mother] [4650] would assemble after mass at the corner of Cathedral Street. They
[A Mother] [4652] friends; and, when they had played every little counter of gossip,
[A Mother] [4653] they shook hands with one another all together, laughing at the
[A Mother] [4732] "And the artistes!" said Mrs. Kearney. "Of course they are doing
[A Mother] [4733] their best, but really they are not good."
[A Mother] [4737] they pleased and reserve all the talent for Saturday night. Mrs.
[A Mother] [4813] The little woman hoped they would have a good house. She looked
[A Mother] [4856] evidently about Kathleen for they both glanced at her often as she
[A Mother] [4863] "I wonder where did they dig her up," said Kathleen to Miss Healy.
[A Mother] [4875] They were both well dressed, stout and complacent and they
[A Mother] [4886] They went down to a discreet part of the corridor. Mrs Kearney
[A Mother] [4907] Miss Healy and the baritone. They were the Freeman man and Mr.
[A Mother] [4910] an American priest was giving in the Mansion House. He said they
[A Mother] [4960] Kearney and spoke with her earnestly. While they were speaking
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5037] they could ride roughshod over her. But she would show them
[A Mother] [5038] their mistake. They wouldn't have dared to have treated her like
[A Mother] [5040] her rights: she wouldn't be fooled. If they didn't pay her to the last
[Grace] [5118] of the stairs down which he had fallen. They succeeded in turning
[Grace] [5136] "And where are they?"
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5230] to inspect the scene of the accident. They agreed that the
[Grace] [5235] When they came out into Grafton Street, Mr. Power whistled for
[Grace] [5245] They shook hands. Mr. Kernan was hoisted on to the car and,
[Grace] [5247] his gratitude to the young man and regretted that they could not
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5377] the other was clerk to a tea- merchant in Belfast. They were good
[Grace] [5515] Jewish ethical code, his fellow-Catholics, whenever they had
[Grace] [5519] son. At other times they remembered his good points.
[Grace] [5569] "How could they be anything else, Tom?" he said.
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5581] where they get these thundering big country fellows, omadhauns,
[Grace] [5596] "These yahoos coming up here," he said, "think they can boss the
[Grace] [5597] people. I needn't tell you, Martin, what kind of men they are."
[Grace] [5704] length. "They're an educated order. I believe they mean well, too."
[Grace] [5726] congregation they have."
[Grace] [5783] "And yet they say he wasn't much of a theologian," said Mr
[Grace] [5788] "O, of course, nothing wrong, you know. Only sometimes, they
[Grace] [5823] "... in the Redeemer. Only they don't believe in the Pope and in the
[Grace] [5976] unanimous. No! They wouldn't have it!"
[Grace] [5980] "And they were a German cardinal by the name of Dolling... or
[Grace] [5999] "There they were at it, all the cardinals and bishops and
[Grace] [6116] aisles until they found seating accommodation. The gentlemen
[Grace] [6122] and laid their hats in security. They sat well back and gazed
[Grace] [6169] of the mammon of iniquity so that when you die they may receive
[Grace] [6195] spiritual life, and see if they tallied accurately with conscience.
[The Dead] [6237] upper part of which they had rented from Mr. Fulham, the
[The Dead] [6244] the Kingstown and Dalkey line. Old as they were, her aunts also
[The Dead] [6249] housemaid's work for them. Though their life was modest, they
[The Dead] [6253] her three mistresses. They were fussy, that was all. But the only
[The Dead] [6254] thing they would not stand was back answers.
[The Dead] [6256] Of course, they had good reason to be fussy on such a night. And
[The Dead] [6258] Gabriel and his wife. Besides they were dreadfully afraid that
[The Dead] [6259] Freddy Malins might turn up screwed. They would not wish for
[The Dead] [6262] manage him. Freddy Malins always came late, but they wondered
[The Dead] [6271] "I'll engage they did," said Gabriel, "but they forget that my wife
[The Dead] [6321] "The men that is now is only all palaver and what they can get out
[The Dead] [6363] Robert Browning, for he feared they would be above the heads of
[The Dead] [6364] his hearers. Some quotation that they would recognise from
[The Dead] [6369] which they could not understand. They would think that he was
[The Dead] [6387] They both kissed Gabriel frankly. He was their favourite nephew
[The Dead] [6507] Miss Morkan, the reason they are so fond of me is----"
[The Dead] [6520] some ladies' punch, hot, strong and sweet. As they said they never
[The Dead] [6567] The two young gentlemen asked the ladies if they might have the
[The Dead] [6581] Jane led her recruits quickly from the room. They had hardly gone
[The Dead] [6650] the other listeners, though they had begged Mary Jane to play
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6702] When they had taken their places she said abruptly:
[The Dead] [6737] politics. But they were friends of many years' standing and their
[The Dead] [6749] When they were together again she spoke of the University
[The Dead] [6809] They had to go visiting together and, as he had not answered her,
[The Dead] [6816] expression on her face. But when they met in the long chain he
[The Dead] [6834] friends they had there. While her tongue rambled on Gabriel tried
[The Dead] [6882] they used to go fishing. Her son-in-law was a splendid fisher. One
[The Dead] [7123] that they got the best slices and Aunt Kate and Aunt Julia opened
[The Dead] [7135] them to sit down and eat their suppers and so did Gabriel but they
[The Dead] [7189] themselves through the streets to her hotel. Why did they never
[The Dead] [7191] Borgia? Because they could not get the voices to sing them: that
[The Dead] [7197] "Where are they?" asked Mr. Browne defiantly.
[The Dead] [7229] the table. Midway down they were held up by Mary Jane, who
[The Dead] [7246] there, how hospitable the monks were and how they never asked
[The Dead] [7254] "O, most people give some donation to the monastery when they
[The Dead] [7261] two in the morning and slept in their coffins. He asked what they
[The Dead] [7283] "They are very good men, the monks, very pious men."
[The Dead] [7367] spacious days: and if they are gone beyond recall let us hope, at
[The Dead] [7424] wealth, long life, happiness and prosperity and may they long
[The Dead] [7425] continue to hold the proud and self-won position which they hold
[The Dead] [7427] they hold in our hearts."
[The Dead] [7432] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7433] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7434] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7440] melodious conference, while they sang with emphasis:
[The Dead] [7445] Then, turning once more towards their hostesses, they sang:
[The Dead] [7447] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7448] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7449] For they are jolly gay fellows,
[The Dead] [7461] The piercing morning air came into the hall where they were
[The Dead] [7698] "They say," said Mary Jane, "we haven't had snow like it for thirty
[The Dead] [7784] They were standing on the crowded platform and he was placing a
[The Dead] [7812] room in the hotel, then they would be alone together. He would
[The Dead] [7821] At the corner of Winetavern Street they met a cab. He was glad of
[The Dead] [7831] "They say you never cross O'Connell Bridge without seeing a
[The Dead] [7859] closely to his side; and, as they stood at the hotel door, he felt that
[The Dead] [7860] they had escaped from their lives and duties, escaped from home
[The Dead] [7865] candle in the office and went before them to the stairs. They
[The Dead] [7873] porter halted on the stairs to settle his guttering candle. They
[The Dead] [7880] hour they were to be called in the morning.
[The Dead] [8100] to. He was in decline, they said, or something like that. I never
[The Dead] [8107] Gabriel, like the way they do in the country. He was going to study
[The Dead] [8188] One by one, they were all becoming shades. Better pass boldly into