Dubliners by James Joyce
think

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 69 occurrences of the word:   think

[The Sisters] [31] "I have my own theory about it," he said. "I think it was one of
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [94] blankets over my head and tried to think of Christmas. But the grey
[The Sisters] [247] resigned. No one would think he'd make such a beautiful corpse."
[The Sisters] [352] think but there he was, sitting up by himself in the dark in his
[The Sisters] [363] when they saw that, that made them think that there was something
[An Encounter] [586] think I was as stupid as Mahony. The man, however, only smiled. I
[After the Race] [1205] great sum under his control. Segouin, perhaps, would not think it a
[Two Gallants] [1671] hours till he met Corley again troubled him a little. He could think
[The Boarding House] [1885] time and Mrs. Mooney began to think of sending Polly back to
[The Boarding House] [1955] think he would face publicity. All the lodgers in the house knew
[A Little Cloud] [2324] "I should think I have! I've knocked about there a little."
[A Little Cloud] [2357] in enjoying life--and don't you think they're right? If you want to
[A Little Cloud] [2542] "You think so?" he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2575] "Must get a bit stale, I should think," he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2610] kissed him and said he was very good to think of her.
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2956] pawn-office in Fleet Street. That was the dart! Why didn't he think
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [3137] "That's right.... Did she think of leaving any dinner for me?"
[Clay] [3292] to know what to buy and all she could think of was cake. She
[A Painful Case] [3499] regulate the civic life. He allowed himself to think that in certain
[A Painful Case] [3694] he did not think the railway officials were to blame.
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3957] "I think you're right," said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4027] going to vote.' But I think he'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4032] mentioned Father Burke's name. I think it'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4117] cigarette-papers and tobacco. "I think Joe Hynes is a straight man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4129] hacks.... I don't say Hynes.... No, damn it, I think he's a stroke
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4213] "No," said Mr. Henchy, "I think he's travelling on his own
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4238] "I think I know the little game they're at," said Mr. Henchy. "You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4242] you think? Would I do for the job?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4593] "What do you think of that, Crofton?" cried Mr. Henchy. "Isn't that
[A Mother] [4956] audience would think that he had come late.
[A Mother] [5021] think of Mrs. Kearney's conduct. He did not like to say anything.
[Grace] [5334] never seems to think he has a home at all."
[Grace] [5471] "No," said Mr. Kernan. "I think I caught cold on the car. There's
[Grace] [5524] his friends to think there had been some mistake, that Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5596] "These yahoos coming up here," he said, "think they can boss the
[Grace] [5764] "Ah,... yes. I think I know him. Rather red face; tall."
[Grace] [5876] "No, no," said Mr. Fogarty eagerly. "I think you're wrong there. It
[Grace] [5877] was Lux in Tenebris, I think--Light in Darkness."
[Grace] [5926] wonderful when you come to think of it?"
[The Dead] [6303] "Yes, Lily," he answered, "and I think we're in for a night of it."
[The Dead] [6369] which they could not understand. They would think that he was
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6862] full of conceit, I think."
[The Dead] [6887] near he began to think again about his speech and about the
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6914] I think it had certain qualities of hospitality, of humour, of
[The Dead] [6967] "Neither did I," said Mr. Browne. "I think her voice has greatly
[The Dead] [6991] "I know all about the honour of God, Mary Jane, but I think it's not
[The Dead] [7168] your opinion of him. I think he has a grand voice."
[The Dead] [7178] Mignon. Of course it was very fine, she said, but it made her think
[The Dead] [7215] was in his prime and I think he had then the purest tenor voice that
[The Dead] [7548] somewhere near Back Lane, I think."
[The Dead] [7704] "So do I," said Miss O'Callaghan. "I think Christmas is never really
[The Dead] [7728] "The Lass of Aughrim," she repeated. "I couldn't think of the
[The Dead] [7980] "Tell me what it is, Gretta. I think I know what is the matter. Do I
[The Dead] [8022] Gabriel was silent. He did not wish her to think that he was
[The Dead] [8084] "I think he died for me," she answered.
[The Dead] [8157] man had died for her sake. It hardly pained him now to think how