Dubliners by James Joyce
to

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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[The Sisters] [9] of a corpse. He had often said to me: "I am not long for this
[The Sisters] [11] true. Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to
[The Sisters] [14] the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some
[The Sisters] [16] to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.
[The Sisters] [19] downstairs to supper. While my aunt was ladling out my stirabout
[The Sisters] [20] he said, as if returning to some former remark of his:
[The Sisters] [26] He began to puff at his pipe, no doubt arranging his opinion in his
[The Sisters] [27] mind. Tiresome old fool! When we knew him first he used to be
[The Sisters] [32] those ... peculiar cases .... But it's hard to say...."
[The Sisters] [34] He began to puff again at his pipe without giving us his theory. My
[The Sisters] [35] uncle saw me staring and said to me:
[The Sisters] [37] "Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear."
[The Sisters] [48] news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.
[The Sisters] [57] looking up from my plate. He returned to his pipe and finally spat
[The Sisters] [60] "I wouldn't like children of mine," he said, "to have too much to
[The Sisters] [61] say to a man like that."
[The Sisters] [69] "That's my principle, too," said my uncle. "Let him learn to box his
[The Sisters] [70] corner. That's what I'm always saying to that Rosicrucian there:
[The Sisters] [72] I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me
[The Sisters] [74] pick of that leg mutton," he added to my aunt.
[The Sisters] [88] to my anger. Tiresome old red-nosed imbecile!
[The Sisters] [91] for alluding to me as a child, I puzzled my head to extract meaning
[The Sisters] [94] blankets over my head and tried to think of Christmas. But the grey
[The Sisters] [96] desired to confess something. I felt my soul receding into some
[The Sisters] [98] me. It began to confess to me in a murmuring voice and I
[The Sisters] [101] paralysis and I felt that I too was smiling feebly as if to absolve the
[The Sisters] [104] The next morning after breakfast I went down to look at the little
[The Sisters] [108] ordinary days a notice used to hang in the window, saying:
[The Sisters] [110] were up. A crape bouquet was tied to the doorknocker with ribbon.
[The Sisters] [120] disturbed to find myself at check. Had he not been dead I would
[The Sisters] [121] have gone into the little dark room behind the shop to find him
[The Sisters] [126] black snuff-box for his hands trembled too much to allow him to
[The Sisters] [128] raised his large trembling hand to his nose little clouds of smoke
[The Sisters] [133] which he tried to brush away the fallen grains, was quite
[The Sisters] [136] I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to
[The Sisters] [144] college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin
[The Sisters] [146] Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of
[The Sisters] [149] difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain
[The Sisters] [155] seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever
[The Sisters] [156] found in himself the courage to undertake them; and I was not
[The Sisters] [162] to smile and nod his head twice or thrice. Sometimes he used to
[The Sisters] [164] learn by heart; and, as I pattered, he used to smile pensively and
[The Sisters] [166] nostril alternately. When he smiled he used to uncover his big
[The Sisters] [172] tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream. I
[The Sisters] [178] In the evening my aunt took me with her to visit the house of
[The Sisters] [180] that looked to the west reflected the tawny gold of a great bank of
[The Sisters] [182] unseemly to have shouted at her, my aunt shook hands with her for
[The Sisters] [184] aunt's nodding, proceeded to toil up the narrow staircase before us,
[The Sisters] [188] went in and the old woman, seeing that I hesitated to enter, began
[The Sisters] [189] to beckon to me again repeatedly with her hand.
[The Sisters] [194] and we three knelt down at the foot of the bed. I pretended to pray
[The Sisters] [198] trodden down all to one side. The fancy came to me that the old
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [210] towards my usual chair in the corner while Nannie went to the
[The Sisters] [212] wine-glasses. She set these on the table and invited us to take a
[The Sisters] [214] sherry into the glasses and passed them to us. She pressed me to
[The Sisters] [216] would make too much noise eating them. She seemed to be
[The Sisters] [217] somewhat disappointed at my refusal and went over quietly to the
[The Sisters] [223] "Ah, well, he's gone to a better world."
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [253] "Well, Miss Flynn, at any rate it must be a great comfort for you to
[The Sisters] [255] to him, I must say."
[The Sisters] [264] about to fall asleep.
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [283] gone to his eternal reward he won't forget you and all your
[The Sisters] [284] kindness to him."
[The Sisters] [286] "Ah, poor James!" said Eliza. "He was no great trouble to us. You
[The Sisters] [288] he's gone and all to that...."
[The Sisters] [300] latterly. Whenever I'd bring in his soup to him there I'd find him
[The Sisters] [301] with his breviary fallen to the floor, lying back in the chair and his
[The Sisters] [307] over he'd go out for a drive one fine day just to see the old house
[The Sisters] [331] quietly to my chair in the comer. Eliza seemed to have fallen into a
[The Sisters] [332] deep revery. We waited respectfully for her to break the silence:
[The Sisters] [338] nervous, God be merciful to him!"
[The Sisters] [344] "That affected his mind," she said. "After that he began to mope by
[The Sisters] [345] himself, talking to no one and wandering about by himself. So one
[The Sisters] [346] night he was wanted for to go on a call and they couldn't find him
[The Sisters] [349] to try the chapel. So then they got the keys and opened the chapel
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[The Sisters] [353] confession-box, wide- awake and laughing-like softly to himself?"
[The Sisters] [355] She stopped suddenly as if to listen. I too listened; but there was
[The Sisters] [362] "Wide-awake and laughing-like to himself.... So then, of course,
[An Encounter] [368] IT WAS Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us. He had a
[An Encounter] [372] brother Leo, the idler, held the loft of the stable while we tried to
[An Encounter] [376] went to eight- o'clock mass every morning in Gardiner Street and
[An Encounter] [392] Indians who were afraid to seem studious or lacking in robustness,
[An Encounter] [396] were traversed from time to time by unkempt fierce and beautiful
[An Encounter] [422] influence of the school was at a distance I began to hunger again
[An Encounter] [424] disorder alone seemed to offer me. The mimic warfare of the
[An Encounter] [425] evening became at last as wearisome to me as the routine of school
[An Encounter] [426] in the morning because I wanted real adventures to happen to
[An Encounter] [427] myself. But real adventures, I reflected, do not happen to people
[An Encounter] [431] to break out of the weariness of schoollife for one day at least.
[An Encounter] [433] miching. Each of us saved up sixpence. We were to meet at ten in
[An Encounter] [434] the morning on the Canal Bridge. Mahony's big sister was to write
[An Encounter] [435] an excuse for him and Leo Dillon was to tell his brother to say he
[An Encounter] [436] was sick. We arranged to go along the Wharf Road until we came
[An Encounter] [437] to the ships, then to cross in the ferryboat and walk out to see the
[An Encounter] [441] were reassured: and I brought the first stage of the plot to an end
[An Encounter] [449] That night I slept badly. In the morning I was firstcomer to the
[An Encounter] [458] through them on to the water. The granite stone of the bridge was
[An Encounter] [459] beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time
[An Encounter] [460] to an air in my head. I was very happy.
[An Encounter] [467] him why he had brought it and he told me he had brought it to
[An Encounter] [480] We walked along the North Strand Road till we came to the Vitriol
[An Encounter] [481] Works and then turned to the right along the Wharf Road. Mahony
[An Encounter] [482] began to play the Indian as soon as we were out of public sight. He
[An Encounter] [484] and, when two ragged boys began, out of chivalry, to fling stones
[An Encounter] [489] the silver badge of a cricket club in his cap. When we came to the
[An Encounter] [499] reached the quays and as all the labourers seemed to be eating
[An Encounter] [500] their lunches, we bought two big currant buns and sat down to eat
[An Encounter] [506] right skit to run away to sea on one of those big ships and even I,
[An Encounter] [508] had been scantily dosed to me at school gradually taking substance
[An Encounter] [509] under my eyes. School and home seemed to recede from us and
[An Encounter] [510] their influences upon us seemed to wane.
[An Encounter] [512] We crossed the Liffey in the ferryboat, paying our toll to be
[An Encounter] [514] bag. We were serious to the point of solemnity, but once during the
[An Encounter] [518] Norwegian vessel. I went to the stern and tried to decipher the
[An Encounter] [519] legend upon it but, failing to do so, I came back and examined the
[An Encounter] [520] foreign sailors to see had any of them green eyes for I had some
[An Encounter] [540] It was too late and we were too tired to carry out our project of
[An Encounter] [541] visiting the Pigeon House. We had to be home before four o'clock
[An Encounter] [543] regretfully at his catapult and I had to suggest going home by train
[An Encounter] [545] clouds and left us to our jaded thoughts and the crumbs of our
[An Encounter] [555] we used to call a jerry hat with a high crown. He seemed to be
[An Encounter] [559] for perhaps fifty paces he turned about and began to retrace his
[An Encounter] [566] with great care. He began to talk of the weather, saying that it
[An Encounter] [570] days and that he would give anything to be young again. While he
[An Encounter] [572] Then he began to talk of school and of books. He asked us whether
[An Encounter] [578] pointing to Mahony who was regarding us with open eyes, "he is
[An Encounter] [593] "Tell us," said Mahony pertly to the man, "how many have you
[An Encounter] [606] accent was good. He began to speak to us about girls, saying what
[An Encounter] [608] girls were not so good as they seemed to be if one only knew.
[An Encounter] [614] orbit. At times he spoke as if he were simply alluding to some fact
[An Encounter] [617] not wish others to overhear. He repeated his phrases over and over
[An Encounter] [619] voice. I continued to gaze towards the foot of the slope, listening
[An Encounter] [620] to him.
[An Encounter] [623] saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes,
[An Encounter] [639] We said nothing further to each other. I was still considering
[An Encounter] [644] cat escaped once more and Mahony began to throw stones at the
[An Encounter] [645] wall she had escaladed. Desisting from this, he began to wander
[An Encounter] [648] After an interval the man spoke to me. He said that my friend was
[An Encounter] [650] was going to reply indignantly that we were not National School
[An Encounter] [651] boys to be whipped, as he called it; but I remained silent. He began
[An Encounter] [652] to speak on the subject of chastising boys. His mind, as if
[An Encounter] [653] magnetised again by his speech, seemed to circle slowly round and
[An Encounter] [655] ought to be whipped and well whipped. When a boy was rough and
[An Encounter] [658] what he wanted was to get a nice warm whipping. I was surprised
[An Encounter] [663] The man continued his monologue. He seemed to have forgotten
[An Encounter] [664] his recent liberalism. He said that if ever he found a boy talking to
[An Encounter] [666] him; and that would teach him not to be talking to girls. And if a
[An Encounter] [670] He described to me how he would whip such a boy as if he were
[An Encounter] [674] seemed to plead with me that I should understand him.
[An Encounter] [678] pretending to fix my shoe properly and then, saying that I was
[An Encounter] [679] obliged to go, I bade him good-day. I went up the slope calmly but
[An Encounter] [687] of my paltry stratagem. I had to call the name again before
[An Encounter] [689] came running across the field to me! He ran as if to bring me aid.
[Araby] [712] priest; in his will he had left all his money to institutions and the
[Araby] [713] furniture of his house to his sister.
[Araby] [723] cottages, to the back doors of the dark dripping gardens where
[Araby] [724] odours arose from the ashpits, to the dark odorous stables where a
[Araby] [726] the buckled harness. When we returned to the street light from the
[Araby] [729] housed. Or if Mangan's sister came out on the doorstep to call her
[Araby] [730] brother in to his tea we watched her from our shadow peer up and
[Araby] [731] down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [737] her hair tossed from side to side.
[Araby] [740] door. The blind was pulled down to within an inch of the sash so
[Araby] [742] heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I
[Araby] [746] spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name
[Araby] [747] was like a summons to all my foolish blood.
[Araby] [749] Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to
[Araby] [751] had to go to carry some of the parcels. We walked through the
[Araby] [759] to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I
[Araby] [761] could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to
[Araby] [763] not know whether I would ever speak to her or not or, if I spoke to
[Araby] [774] to desire to veil themselves and, feeling that I was about to slip
[Araby] [778] At last she spoke to me. When she addressed the first words to me
[Araby] [779] I was so confused that I did not know what to answer. She asked
[Araby] [780] me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It
[Araby] [781] would be a splendid bazaar, she said she would love to go.
[Araby] [800] thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious
[Araby] [803] me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby
[Araby] [804] were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated
[Araby] [805] and cast an Eastern enchantment over me. I asked for leave to go
[Araby] [806] to the bazaar on Saturday night. My aunt was surprised and hoped
[Araby] [808] class. I watched my master's face pass from amiability to
[Araby] [809] sternness; he hoped I was not beginning to idle. I could not call my
[Araby] [812] desire, seemed to me child's play, ugly monotonous child's play.
[Araby] [814] On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to
[Araby] [825] When I came home to dinner my uncle had not yet been home.
[Araby] [827] its ticking began to irritate me, I left the room. I mounted the
[Araby] [829] empty gloomy rooms liberated me and I went from room to room
[Araby] [841] collected used stamps for some pious purpose. I had to endure the
[Araby] [843] and still my uncle did not come. Mrs. Mercer stood up to go: she
[Araby] [845] o'clock and she did not like to be out late as the night air was bad
[Araby] [846] for her. When she had gone I began to walk up and down the
[Araby] [852] him talking to himself and heard the hallstand rocking when it had
[Araby] [854] When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me
[Araby] [855] the money to go to the bazaar. He had forgotten.
[Araby] [859] I did not smile. My aunt said to him energetically:
[Araby] [867] him a second time he asked me did I know The Arab's Farewell to
[Araby] [868] his Steed. When I left the kitchen he was about to recite the
[Araby] [869] opening lines of the piece to my aunt.
[Araby] [873] buyers and glaring with gas recalled to me the purpose of my
[Araby] [878] pressed to the carriage doors; but the porters moved them back,
[Araby] [881] improvised wooden platform. I passed out on to the road and saw
[Araby] [882] by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten. In front
[Araby] [887] shilling to a weary-looking man. I found myself in a big hall
[Araby] [894] lamps, two men were counting money on a salver. I listened to the
[Araby] [897] Remembering with difficulty why I had come I went over to one of
[Araby] [901] listened vaguely to their conversation.
[Araby] [916] to buy anything. The tone of her voice was not encouraging; she
[Araby] [917] seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty. I looked
[Araby] [919] of the dark entrance to the stall and murmured:
[Araby] [924] back to the two young men. They began to talk of the same
[Araby] [928] I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless, to
[Araby] [931] the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a
[Eveline] [947] new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which
[Eveline] [948] they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then
[Eveline] [951] roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field
[Eveline] [954] too grown up. Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field
[Eveline] [955] with his blackthorn stick; but usually little Keogh used to keep nix
[Eveline] [956] and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to
[Eveline] [960] Tizzie Dunn was dead, too, and the Waters had gone back to
[Eveline] [961] England. Everything changes. Now she was going to go away like
[Eveline] [962] the others, to leave her home.
[Eveline] [971] the coloured print of the promises made to Blessed Margaret Mary
[Eveline] [973] showed the photograph to a visitor her father used to pass it with a
[Eveline] [978] She had consented to go away, to leave her home. Was that wise?
[Eveline] [979] She tried to weigh each side of the question. In her home anyway
[Eveline] [981] her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the
[Eveline] [1000] growing up he had never gone for her like he used to go for Harry
[Eveline] [1001] and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to
[Eveline] [1002] threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead
[Eveline] [1003] mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was
[Eveline] [1006] invariable squabble for money on Saturday nights had begun to
[Eveline] [1009] was to get any money from her father. He said she used to
[Eveline] [1010] squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to
[Eveline] [1011] give her his hard-earned money to throw about the streets, and
[Eveline] [1014] of buying Sunday's dinner. Then she had to rush out as quickly as
[Eveline] [1018] work to keep the house together and to see that the two young
[Eveline] [1019] children who had been left to hr charge went to school regularly
[Eveline] [1021] now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly
[Eveline] [1024] She was about to explore another life with Frank. Frank was very
[Eveline] [1025] kind, manly, open-hearted. She was to go away with him by the
[Eveline] [1026] night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres
[Eveline] [1029] main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He
[Eveline] [1032] come to know each other. He used to meet her outside the Stores
[Eveline] [1033] every evening and see her home. He took her to see The Bohemian
[Eveline] [1038] used to call her Poppens out of fun. First of all it had been an
[Eveline] [1039] excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like
[Eveline] [1041] at a pound a month on a ship of the Allan Line going out to
[Eveline] [1046] to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had
[Eveline] [1047] found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say
[Eveline] [1048] to him.
[Eveline] [1052] One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to
[Eveline] [1056] her lap grew indistinct. One was to Harry; the other was to her
[Eveline] [1062] they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She
[Eveline] [1063] remembered her father putting on her mothers bonnet to make the
[Eveline] [1066] Her time was running out but she continued to sit by the window,
[Eveline] [1070] very night to remind her of the promise to her mother, her promise
[Eveline] [1071] to keep the home together as long as she could. She remembered
[Eveline] [1074] melancholy air of Italy. The organ-player had been ordered to go
[Eveline] [1089] love, too. But she wanted to live. Why should she be unhappy? She
[Eveline] [1090] had a right to happiness. Frank would take her in his arms, fold her
[Eveline] [1094] Wall. He held her hand and she knew that he was speaking to her,
[Eveline] [1100] maze of distress, she prayed to God to direct her, to show her what
[Eveline] [1123] He rushed beyond the barrier and called to her to follow. He was
[Eveline] [1124] shouted at to go on but he still called to her. She set her white face
[Eveline] [1125] to him, passive, like a helpless animal. Her eyes gave him no sign
[After the Race] [1132] Inchicore sightseers had gathered in clumps to watch the cars
[After the Race] [1146] seemed to be at present well above the level of successful
[After the Race] [1152] orders in advance (he was about to start a motor establishment in
[After the Race] [1153] Paris) and Riviere was in good humour because he was to be
[After the Race] [1159] too excited to be genuinely happy.
[After the Race] [1166] money many times over. He had also been fortunate enough to
[After the Race] [1168] rich enough to be alluded to in the Dublin newspapers as a
[After the Race] [1169] merchant prince. He had sent his son to England to be educated in
[After the Race] [1170] a big Catholic college and had afterwards sent him to Dublin
[After the Race] [1171] University to study law. Jimmy did not study very earnestly and
[After the Race] [1172] took to bad courses for a while. He had money and he was popular;
[After the Race] [1174] circles. Then he had been sent for a term to Cambridge to see a
[After the Race] [1180] to own some of the biggest hotels in France. Such a person (as his
[After the Race] [1190] Jimmy had to strain forward to catch the quick phrase. This was
[After the Race] [1191] not altogether pleasant for him, as he had nearly always to make a
[After the Race] [1200] had presented him to one of the French competitors and, in answer
[After the Race] [1201] to his confused murmur of compliment, the swarthy face of the
[After the Race] [1203] after that honour to return to the profane world of spectators amid
[After the Race] [1204] nudges and significant looks. Then as to money--he really had a
[After the Race] [1212] much more so now when he was about to stake the greater part of
[After the Race] [1216] managed to give the impression that it was by a favour of
[After the Race] [1217] friendship the mite of Irish money was to be included in the capital
[After the Race] [1220] first suggested the investment; money to be made in the motor
[After the Race] [1222] air of wealth. Jimmy set out to translate into days' work that lordly
[After the Race] [1226] machinery of human nerves strove to answer the bounding courses
[After the Race] [1232] friend alighted. A little knot of people collected on the footpath to
[After the Race] [1233] pay homage to the snorting motor. The party was to dine together
[After the Race] [1235] friend, who was staying with him, were to go home to dress. The
[After the Race] [1244] eagerness, also, to play fast and loose for the names of great
[After the Race] [1247] equation to the bows of his dress tie, his father may have felt even
[After the Race] [1252] upon the Hungarian, who was beginning to have a sharp desire for
[After the Race] [1266] to discover to the mildly surprised Englishman the beauties of the
[After the Race] [1268] not wholly ingenuously, undertook to explain to Jimmy the
[After the Race] [1270] Hungarian was about to prevail in ridicule of the spurious lutes of
[After the Race] [1273] influences, felt the buried zeal of his father wake to life within
[After the Race] [1277] glass to Humanity and, when the toast had been drunk, he threw
[After the Race] [1296] the crowd, blended now into soft colours, to a music of merry
[After the Race] [1298] as it seemed to Jimmy, they were walking out of Kingstown
[After the Race] [1310] American's yacht. There was to be supper, music, cards. Villona
[After the Race] [1320] A man brought in a light supper, and the young men sat down to it
[After the Race] [1329] Cards! cards! The table was cleared. Villona returned quietly to his
[After the Race] [1334] was flashing. Play ran very high and paper began to pass. Jimmy
[After the Race] [1337] and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.'s for him. They were
[After the Race] [1343] a terrible game. They stopped just before the end of it to drink for
[After the Race] [1346] of course. How much had he written away? The men rose to their
[After the Race] [1347] feet to play the last tricks. talking and gesticulating. Routh won.
[After the Race] [1349] bundled together. They began then to gather in what they had won.
[Two Gallants] [1372] them was just bringing a long monologue to a close. The other,
[Two Gallants] [1373] who walked on the verge of the path and was at times obliged to
[Two Gallants] [1374] step on to the road, owing to his companion's rudeness, wore an
[Two Gallants] [1376] was shoved far back from his forehead and the narrative to which
[Two Gallants] [1394] His voice seemed winnowed of vigour; and to enforce his words he
[Two Gallants] [1405] against him. He had a brave manner of coming up to a party of
[Two Gallants] [1409] He was insensitive to all kinds of discourtesy. No one knew how
[Two Gallants] [1422] man, I met her by appointment. We vent out to Donnybrook and I
[Two Gallants] [1423] brought her into a field there. She told me she used to go with a
[Two Gallants] [1427] fellow used to smoke.... I was afraid, man, she'd get in the family
[Two Gallants] [1428] way. But she's up to the dodge."
[Two Gallants] [1433] Pim's. She doesn't know my name. I was too hairy to tell her that.
[Two Gallants] [1443] to the roadway and back again. Corley was the son of an inspector
[Two Gallants] [1446] swaying his head from side to side. His head was large, globular
[Two Gallants] [1450] parade and, when he wished to gaze after someone in the street, it
[Two Gallants] [1451] was necessary for him to move his body from the hips. At present
[Two Gallants] [1453] always ready to give him the hard word. He was often to be seen
[Two Gallants] [1456] judgments. He spoke without listening to the speech of his
[Two Gallants] [1458] had said to such a person and what such a person had said to him
[Two Gallants] [1459] and what he had said to settle the matter. When he reported these
[Two Gallants] [1464] walked on through the crowd Corley occasionally turned to smile
[Two Gallants] [1470] "Well... tell me, Corley, I suppose you'll be able to pull it off all
[Two Gallants] [1478] "She's all right," said Corley. "I know the way to get around her,
[Two Gallants] [1484] A shade of mockery relieved the servility of his manner. To save
[Two Gallants] [1485] himself he had the habit of leaving his flattery open to the
[Two Gallants] [1488] "There's nothing to touch a good slavey," he affirmed. "Take my
[Two Gallants] [1493] "First I used to go with girls, you know," said Corley, unbosoming;
[Two Gallants] [1494] "girls off the South Circular. I used to take them out, man, on the
[Two Gallants] [1495] tram somewhere and pay the tram or take them to a band or a play
[Two Gallants] [1497] way. I used to spend money on them right enough," he added, in a
[Two Gallants] [1512] the moon, now nearly veiled, and seemed to meditate.
[Two Gallants] [1525] This time Lenehan was inclined to disbelieve. He shook his head
[Two Gallants] [1526] to and fro and smiled.
[Two Gallants] [1530] "Honest to God!" said Corley. "Didn't she tell me herself?"
[Two Gallants] [1546] 'Ecod! Corley, you know how to take them," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1548] "I'm up to all their little tricks," Corley confessed.
[Two Gallants] [1555] reassurance. Corley swung his head to and fro as if to toss aside an
[Two Gallants] [1558] "I'll pull it off," he said. "Leave it to me, can't you?"
[Two Gallants] [1560] Lenehan said no more. He did not wish to ruffle his friend's
[Two Gallants] [1561] temper, to be sent to the devil and told that his advice was not
[Two Gallants] [1570] roadway, playing to a little ring of listeners. He plucked at the
[Two Gallants] [1571] wires heedlessly, glancing quickly from time to time at the face of
[Two Gallants] [1572] each new-comer and from time to time, wearily also, at the sky.
[Two Gallants] [1595] "Are you trying to get inside me?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1598] want is to have a look at her. I'm not going to eat her."
[Two Gallants] [1601] you what. I'll go over and talk to her and you can pass by."
[Two Gallants] [1619] head from side to side. His bulk, his easy pace, and the solid sound
[Two Gallants] [1622] to converse with her. She swung her umbrella more quickly and
[Two Gallants] [1623] executed half turns on her heels. Once or twice when he spoke to
[Two Gallants] [1632] The great silver buckle of her belt seemed to depress the centre of
[Two Gallants] [1643] Corley returned a salute to the air. This he did by raising his hand
[Two Gallants] [1648] towards him and, when they turned to the right, he followed them,
[Two Gallants] [1650] Square. As he walked on slowly, timing his pace to theirs, he
[Two Gallants] [1657] Now that he was alone his face looked older. His gaiety seemed to
[Two Gallants] [1659] allowed his hand to run along them. The air which the harpist had
[Two Gallants] [1660] played began to control his movements His softly padded feet
[Two Gallants] [1667] that was meant to charm him and did not answer the glances which
[Two Gallants] [1668] invited him to be bold. He knew that he would have to speak a
[Two Gallants] [1669] great deal, to invent and to amuse and his brain and throat were
[Two Gallants] [1672] of no way of passing them but to keep on walking. He turned to the
[Two Gallants] [1673] left when he came to the corner of Rutland Square and felt more at
[Two Gallants] [1685] grudging curates to bring him, he had eaten nothing since
[Two Gallants] [1696] He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility for his entry
[Two Gallants] [1697] had been followed by a pause of talk. His face was heated. To
[Two Gallants] [1713] thought how pleasant it would be to have a warm fire to sit by and
[Two Gallants] [1714] a good dinner to sit down to. He had walked the streets long
[Two Gallants] [1719] life, less vanquished in spirit. He might yet be able to settle down
[Two Gallants] [1723] He paid twopence halfpenny to the slatternly girl and went out of
[Two Gallants] [1724] the shop to begin his wandering again. He went into Capel Street
[Two Gallants] [1727] and stopped to converse with them. He was glad that he could rest
[Two Gallants] [1739] He left his friends at a quarter to ten and went up George's Street.
[Two Gallants] [1740] He turned to the left at the City Markets and walked on into
[Two Gallants] [1750] expected to see Corley and the young woman return.
[Two Gallants] [1754] leave it to the last. He suffered all the pangs and thrills of his
[Two Gallants] [1762] his last cigarette and began to smoke it nervously. He strained his
[Two Gallants] [1768] delight and keeping close to his lamp-post tried to read the result
[Two Gallants] [1771] They did not seem to be speaking. An intimation of the result
[Two Gallants] [1784] up the steps. The door closed on her and Corley began to walk
[Two Gallants] [1789] house which the young woman had entered to see that he was not
[Two Gallants] [1795] Corley turned his head to see who had called him, and then
[Two Gallants] [1807] Corley swerved to the left and went up the side street. His features
[Two Gallants] [1816] smiling, opened it slowly to the gaze of his disciple. A small gold
[The Boarding House] [1822] was quite able to keep things to herself: a determined woman. She
[The Boarding House] [1825] Mooney began to go to the devil. He drank, plundered the till, ran
[The Boarding House] [1827] was sure to break out again a few days after. By fighting his wife
[The Boarding House] [1830] had to sleep a neighbour's house.
[The Boarding House] [1832] After that they lived apart. She went to the priest and got a
[The Boarding House] [1834] neither money nor food nor house-room; and so he was obliged to
[The Boarding House] [1838] day long he sat in the bailiff's room, waiting to be put on a job.
[The Boarding House] [1845] house cunningly and firmly, knew when to give credit, when to be
[The Boarding House] [1846] stern and when to let things pass. All the resident young men spoke
[The Boarding House] [1855] son, who was clerk to a commission agent in Fleet Street, had the
[The Boarding House] [1858] met his friends he had always a good one to tell them and he was
[The Boarding House] [1859] always sure to be on to a good thing-that is to say, a likely horse or
[The Boarding House] [1875] Mrs. Mooney had first sent her daughter to be a typist in a
[The Boarding House] [1876] corn-factor's office but, as a disreputable sheriff's man used to
[The Boarding House] [1877] come every other day to the office, asking to be allowed to say a
[The Boarding House] [1878] word to his daughter, she had taken her daughter home again and
[The Boarding House] [1879] set her to do housework. As Polly was very lively the intention was
[The Boarding House] [1880] to give her the run of the young men. Besides young men like to
[The Boarding House] [1885] time and Mrs. Mooney began to think of sending Polly back to
[The Boarding House] [1893] understanding but, though people in the house began to talk of the
[The Boarding House] [1894] affair, still Mrs. Mooney did not intervene. Polly began to grow a
[The Boarding House] [1896] perturbed. At last, when she judged it to be the right moment, Mrs.
[The Boarding House] [1912] collect the crusts and pieces of broken bread to help to make
[The Boarding House] [1915] began to reconstruct the interview which she had had the night
[The Boarding House] [1919] awkward by her not wishing to receive the news in too cavalier a
[The Boarding House] [1920] fashion or to seem to have connived and Polly had been made
[The Boarding House] [1922] her awkward but also because she did not wish it to be thought that
[The Boarding House] [1929] seventeen minutes past eleven: she would have lots of time to have
[The Boarding House] [1931] Marlborough Street. She was sure she would win. To begin with
[The Boarding House] [1933] outraged mother. She had allowed him to live beneath her roof,
[The Boarding House] [1944] had his moment of pleasure, but the girl has to bear the brunt.
[The Boarding House] [1945] Some mothers would be content to patch up such an affair for a
[The Boarding House] [1950] She counted all her cards again before sending Mary up to Doran's
[The Boarding House] [1951] room to say that she wished to speak with him. She felt sure she
[The Boarding House] [1969] made two attempts to shave but his hand had been so unsteady that
[The Boarding House] [1970] he had been obliged to desist. Three days' reddish beard fringed his
[The Boarding House] [1972] so that he had to take them off and polish them with his
[The Boarding House] [1974] night before was a cause of acute pain to him; the priest had drawn
[The Boarding House] [1979] would be sure to be talked of and his employer would be certain to
[The Boarding House] [1988] existence of God to his companions in public- houses. But that was
[The Boarding House] [1990] Reynolds's Newspaper every week but he attended to his religious
[The Boarding House] [1992] money enough to settle down on; it was not that. But the family
[The Boarding House] [1994] father and then her mother's boarding house was beginning to get a
[The Boarding House] [1999] not make up his mind whether to like her or despise her for what
[The Boarding House] [2001] to remain free, not to marry. Once you are married you are done
[The Boarding House] [2006] all, that she had made a clean breast of it to her mother and that
[The Boarding House] [2010] "O Bob! Bob! What am I to do? What am I to do at all?"
[The Boarding House] [2012] She would put an end to herself, she said.
[The Boarding House] [2014] He comforted her feebly, telling her not to cry, that it would be all
[The Boarding House] [2022] at his door, timidly. She wanted to relight her candle at his for hers
[The Boarding House] [2032] If the night was anyway cold or wet or windy there was sure to be
[The Boarding House] [2036] They used to go upstairs together on tiptoe, each with a candle,
[The Boarding House] [2038] to kiss. He remembered well her eyes, the touch of her hand and
[The Boarding House] [2041] But delirium passes. He echoed her phrase, applying it to himself:
[The Boarding House] [2042] "What am I to do?" The instinct of the celibate warned him to hold
[The Boarding House] [2046] While he was sitting with her on the side of the bed Mary came to
[The Boarding House] [2047] the door and said that the missus wanted to see him in the parlour.
[The Boarding House] [2048] He stood up to put on his coat and waistcoat, more helpless than
[The Boarding House] [2049] ever. When he was dressed he went over to her to comfort her. It
[The Boarding House] [2054] moisture that he had to take them off and polish them. He longed
[The Boarding House] [2055] to ascend through the roof and fly away to another country where
[The Boarding House] [2067] artistes, a little blond Londoner, had made a rather free allusion to
[The Boarding House] [2069] violence. Everyone tried to quiet him. The music-hall artiste, a
[The Boarding House] [2076] dried her eyes and went over to the looking-glass. She dipped the
[The Boarding House] [2079] hairpin above her ear. Then she went back to the bed again and sat
[The Boarding House] [2087] memories gradually giving place to hopes and visions of the
[The Boarding House] [2092] At last she heard her mother calling. She started to her feet and ran
[The Boarding House] [2093] to the banisters.
[The Boarding House] [2099] "Come down, dear. Mr. Doran wants to speak to you."
[A Little Cloud] [2110] place and he had deserved to win. It was something to have a
[A Little Cloud] [2127] on the London Press. He turned often from his tiresome writing to
[A Little Cloud] [2136] He felt how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being
[A Little Cloud] [2137] the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.
[A Little Cloud] [2141] sat in the little room off the hall, he had been tempted to take one
[A Little Cloud] [2142] down from the bookshelf and read out something to his wife. But
[A Little Cloud] [2144] on their shelves. At times he repeated lines to himself and this
[A Little Cloud] [2161] He knew that people went there after the theatre to eat oysters and
[A Little Cloud] [2168] always passed without turning his head to look. It was his habit to
[A Little Cloud] [2178] He turned to the right towards Capel Street. Ignatius Gallaher on
[A Little Cloud] [2182] to say that Ignatius Gallaher was wild Of course, he did mix with a
[A Little Cloud] [2190] the remembrance brought a slight flush of pride to his cheek) one
[A Little Cloud] [2193] "Half time now, boys," he used to say light-heartedly. "Where's my
[A Little Cloud] [2200] felt himself superior to the people he passed. For the first time his
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2205] pitied the poor stunted houses. They seemed to him a band of
[A Little Cloud] [2210] poem to express his idea. Perhaps Gallaher might be able to get it
[A Little Cloud] [2212] original? He was not sure what idea he wished to express but the
[A Little Cloud] [2216] Every step brought him nearer to London, farther from his own
[A Little Cloud] [2217] sober inartistic life. A light began to tremble on the horizon of his
[A Little Cloud] [2219] said to be just at the point of maturity. There were so many
[A Little Cloud] [2220] different moods and impressions that he wished to express in
[A Little Cloud] [2221] verse. He felt them within him. He tried weigh his soul to see if it
[A Little Cloud] [2225] give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen.
[A Little Cloud] [2227] crowd but he might appeal to a little circle of kindred minds. The
[A Little Cloud] [2230] that, he would put in allusions. He began to invent sentences and
[A Little Cloud] [2234] was not more Irish-looking. Perhaps it would be better to insert his
[A Little Cloud] [2236] better still: T. Malone Chandler. He would speak to Gallaher about
[A Little Cloud] [2240] to turn back. As he came near Corless's his former agitation began
[A Little Cloud] [2241] to overmaster him and he halted before the door in indecision.
[A Little Cloud] [2246] shining of many red and green wine-glasses The bar seemed to him
[A Little Cloud] [2247] to be full of people and he felt that the people were observing him
[A Little Cloud] [2248] curiously. He glanced quickly to right and left (frowning slightly to
[A Little Cloud] [2250] he saw that nobody had turned to look at him: and there, sure
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2273] looking for copy and sometimes not finding it: and then, always to
[A Little Cloud] [2275] for a few days. I'm deuced glad, I can tell you, to get back to the
[A Little Cloud] [2280] Little Chandler allowed his whisky to be very much diluted.
[A Little Cloud] [2288] "Ah well," said Ignatius Gallaher, cheerfully, "here's to us and to
[A Little Cloud] [2294] seems to be in a bad way. What's he doing?"
[A Little Cloud] [2296] "Nothing, said Little Chandler. "He's gone to the dogs."
[A Little Cloud] [2302] "I met him one night in London and he seemed to be very flush....
[A Little Cloud] [2310] very same serious person that used to lecture me on Sunday
[A Little Cloud] [2312] want to knock about a bit in the world. Have you never been
[A Little Cloud] [2315] "I've been to the Isle of Man," said Little Chandler.
[A Little Cloud] [2319] "The Isle of Man!" he said. "Go to London or Paris: Paris, for
[A Little Cloud] [2340] "I've been to the Moulin Rouge," Ignatius Gallaher continued when
[A Little Cloud] [2341] the barman had removed their glasses, "and I've been to all the
[A Little Cloud] [2347] the former toast. He was beginning to feel somewhat disillusioned.
[A Little Cloud] [2357] in enjoying life--and don't you think they're right? If you want to
[A Little Cloud] [2358] enjoy yourself properly you must go to Paris. And, mind you,
[A Little Cloud] [2360] from Ireland they were ready to eat me, man."
[A Little Cloud] [2370] bits in Paris. Go to one of the students' balls, for instance. That's
[A Little Cloud] [2371] lively, if you like, when the cocottes begin to let themselves loose.
[A Little Cloud] [2407] calm historian's tone, he proceeded to sketch for his friend some
[A Little Cloud] [2409] the vices of many capitals and seemed inclined to award the palm
[A Little Cloud] [2410] to Berlin. Some things he could not vouch for (his friends had told
[A Little Cloud] [2415] a story about an English duchess--a story which he knew to be
[A Little Cloud] [2424] Well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "it's a relaxation to come over here,
[A Little Cloud] [2434] "I hope it's not too late in the day to offer my best wishes," said
[A Little Cloud] [2465] back. My wife will be delighted to meet you. We can have a little
[A Little Cloud] [2474] fellow, clever young chap he is too, and we arranged to go to a
[A Little Cloud] [2489] "And to clinch the bargain," said Little Chandler, "we'll just have
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2502] Little Chandler ordered the drinks. The blush which had risen to
[A Little Cloud] [2505] Three small whiskies had gone to his head and Gallaher's strong
[A Little Cloud] [2509] noise, of listening to Gallaher's stories and of sharing for a brief
[A Little Cloud] [2512] life and his friend's and it seemed to him unjust. Gallaher was his
[A Little Cloud] [2517] He wished to vindicate himself in some way, to assert his
[A Little Cloud] [2527] happiness to Mr. and Mrs. Ignatius Gallaher."
[A Little Cloud] [2533] "No blooming fear of that, my boy. I'm going to have my fling first
[A Little Cloud] [2553] mooning and spooning about it. I mean to marry money. She'll
[A Little Cloud] [2559] know what it is? I've only to say the word and tomorrow I can have
[A Little Cloud] [2566] He tossed his glass to his mouth, finished his drink and laughed
[A Little Cloud] [2571] to one woman, you know."
[A Little Cloud] [2578] arms. To save money they kept no servant but Annie's young sister
[A Little Cloud] [2580] the evening to help. But Monica had gone home long ago. It was a
[A Little Cloud] [2581] quarter to nine. Little Chandler had come home late for tea and,
[A Little Cloud] [2582] moreover, he had forgotten to bring Annie home the parcel of
[A Little Cloud] [2586] she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and
[A Little Cloud] [2600] and trying to appear at his ease while the girl piled ladies' blouses
[A Little Cloud] [2601] before him, paying at the desk and forgetting to take up the odd
[A Little Cloud] [2603] striving to hide his blushes as he left the shop by examining the
[A Little Cloud] [2604] parcel to see if it was securely tied. When he brought the blouse
[A Little Cloud] [2607] it was a regular swindle to charge ten and elevenpence for it. At
[A Little Cloud] [2608] first she wanted to take it back but when she tried it on she was
[A Little Cloud] [2610] kissed him and said he was very good to think of her.
[A Little Cloud] [2629] escape from his little house? Was it too late for him to try to live
[A Little Cloud] [2630] bravely like Gallaher? Could he go to London? There was the
[A Little Cloud] [2631] furniture still to be paid for. If he could only write a book and get
[A Little Cloud] [2636] began to read the first poem in the book:
[A Little Cloud] [2642] Whilst I return to view my Margaret's tomb
[A Little Cloud] [2649] wanted to describe: his sensation of a few hours before on Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2652] The child awoke and began to cry. He turned from the page and
[A Little Cloud] [2653] tried to hush it: but it would not be hushed. He began to rock it to
[A Little Cloud] [2655] faster while his eyes began to read the second stanza:
[A Little Cloud] [2664] and suddenly bending to the child's face he shouted:
[A Little Cloud] [2669] to scream. He jumped up from his chair and walked hastily up and
[A Little Cloud] [2670] down the room with the child in his arms. It began to sob
[A Little Cloud] [2673] He tried to soothe it but it sobbed more convulsively. He looked at
[A Little Cloud] [2674] the contracted and quivering face of the child and began to be
[A Little Cloud] [2676] caught the child to his breast in fright. If it died!...
[A Little Cloud] [2685] "It's nothing, Annie ... it's nothing.... He began to cry..."
[A Little Cloud] [2689] "What have you done to him?" she cried, glaring into his face.
[A Little Cloud] [2692] his heart closed together as he met the hatred in them. He began to
[A Little Cloud] [2695] "It's nothing.... He ... he began to cry.... I couldn't ... I didn't do
[A Little Cloud] [2698] Giving no heed to him she began to walk up and down the room,
[A Little Cloud] [2707] child's sobbing grew less and less; and tears of remorse started to
[Counterparts] [2712] THE bell rang furiously and, when Miss Parker went to the tube, a
[Counterparts] [2717] Miss Parker returned to her machine, saying to a man who was
[Counterparts] [2723] his chair to stand up. When he stood up he was tall and of great
[Counterparts] [2729] He went heavily upstairs until he came to the second landing,
[Counterparts] [2742] "Farrington? What is the meaning of this? Why have I always to
[Counterparts] [2749] "Mr. Shelley said, sir .... Kindly attend to what I say and not to
[Counterparts] [2758] well be talking to the wall as talking to you. Understand once for
[Counterparts] [2760] half. How many courses do you want, I'd like to know.... Do you
[Counterparts] [2774] began to upset all the papers, searching for something. Then, as if
[Counterparts] [2778] "Eh? Are you going to stand there all day? Upon my word,
[Counterparts] [2781] "I was waiting to see..."
[Counterparts] [2783] "Very good, you needn't wait to see. Go downstairs and do your
[Counterparts] [2790] He returned to his desk in the lower office and counted the sheets
[Counterparts] [2791] which remained to be copied. He took up his pen and dipped it in
[Counterparts] [2792] the ink but he continued to stare stupidly at the last words he had
[Counterparts] [2801] to indicate the objective of his journey.
[Counterparts] [2817] counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom,
[Counterparts] [2833] counter as if to intimate that their presence prevented him from
[Counterparts] [2843] sat down at his desk to get what was required, he realised how
[Counterparts] [2845] half past five. The dark damp night was coming and he longed to
[Counterparts] [2851] The moist pungent perfume lay all the way up to Mr. Alleyne's
[Counterparts] [2853] appearance. Mr. Alleyne was said to be sweet on her or on her
[Counterparts] [2854] money. She came to the office often and stayed a long time when
[Counterparts] [2858] round to face her and thrown his right foot jauntily upon his left
[Counterparts] [2862] correspondence and then flicked it towards him as if to say: "That's
[Counterparts] [2865] The man returned to the lower office and sat down again at his
[Counterparts] [2869] began to hurry Miss Parker, saying she would never have the
[Counterparts] [2870] letters typed in time for post. The man listened to the clicking of
[Counterparts] [2871] the machine for a few minutes and then set to work to finish his
[Counterparts] [2872] copy. But his head was not clear and his mind wandered away to
[Counterparts] [2875] five he had still fourteen pages to write. Blast it! He couldn't finish
[Counterparts] [2876] it in time. He longed to execrate aloud, to bring his fist down on
[Counterparts] [2878] Bernard instead of Bernard Bodley and had to begin again on a
[Counterparts] [2881] He felt strong enough to clear out the whole office singlehanded.
[Counterparts] [2882] His body ached to do something, to rush out and revel in violence.
[Counterparts] [2902] Alleyne. "Tell me," he added, glancing first for approval to the
[Counterparts] [2906] The man glanced from the lady's face to the little egg-shaped head
[Counterparts] [2910] "I don't think, sir," he said, "that that's a fair question to put to me."
[Counterparts] [2915] began to smile broadly. Mr. Alleyne flushed to the hue of a wild
[Counterparts] [2917] fist in the man's face till it seemed to vibrate like the knob of some
[Counterparts] [2921] work of you! Wait till you see! You'll apologise to me for your
[Counterparts] [2923] telling you, or you'll apologise to me!"
[Counterparts] [2929] He stood in a doorway opposite the office watching to see if the
[Counterparts] [2931] the cashier came out with the chief clerk. It was no use trying to
[Counterparts] [2932] say a word to him when he was with the chief clerk. The man felt
[Counterparts] [2933] that his position was bad enough. He had been obliged to offer an
[Counterparts] [2934] abject apology to Mr. Alleyne for his impertinence but he knew
[Counterparts] [2937] out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew. He
[Counterparts] [2940] rest; his life would be a hell to him. He had made a proper fool of
[Counterparts] [2944] North of Ireland accent to amuse Higgins and Miss Parker: that
[Counterparts] [2947] with two establishments to keep up, of course he couldn't....
[Counterparts] [2950] public-house. The fog had begun to chill him and he wondered
[Counterparts] [2960] muttering to himself that they could all go to hell because he was
[Counterparts] [2961] going to have a good night of it. The clerk in Terry Kelly's said A
[Counterparts] [2973] in which he would narrate the incident to the boys:
[Counterparts] [2977] don't think that that's a fair question to put to me,' says I."
[Counterparts] [2983] came in and the story was repeated to them. O'Halloran stood
[Counterparts] [2985] made to the chief clerk when he was in Callan's of Fownes's Street;
[Counterparts] [2987] the eclogues, he had to admit that it was not as clever as
[Counterparts] [2988] Farrington's retort. At this Farrington told the boys to polish off
[Counterparts] [2992] Higgins! Of course he had to join in with the others. The men
[Counterparts] [2993] asked him to give his version of it, and he did so with great
[Counterparts] [3003] money but neither of the other two seemed to have any; so the
[Counterparts] [3005] Duke Street Higgins and Nosey Flynn bevelled off to the left while
[Counterparts] [3011] little party at the corner of the counter. They began to exchange
[Counterparts] [3012] stories. Leonard introduced them to a young fellow named
[Counterparts] [3017] have an Apollinaris too; but the boys told Tim to make theirs hot.
[Counterparts] [3020] hospitality was too Irish. He promised to get them in behind the
[Counterparts] [3021] scenes and introduce them to some nice girls. O'Halloran said that
[Counterparts] [3026] and promised to meet them later on at Mulligan's in Poolbeg
[Counterparts] [3029] When the Scotch House closed they went round to Mulligan's.
[Counterparts] [3031] small hot specials all round. They were all beginning to feel
[Counterparts] [3033] Weathers came back. Much to Farrington's relief he drank a glass
[Counterparts] [3034] of bitter this time. Funds were getting low but they had enough to
[Counterparts] [3042] her chin; and she wore bright yellow gloves, reaching to the elbow.
[Counterparts] [3052] all the whiskies and Apolinaris which he had stood to Weathers. If
[Counterparts] [3058] to the company and boasting so much that the other two had called
[Counterparts] [3059] on Farrington to uphold the national honour. Farrington pulled up
[Counterparts] [3060] his sleeve accordingly and showed his biceps muscle to the
[Counterparts] [3062] it was agreed to have a trial of strength. The table was cleared and
[Counterparts] [3064] Leonard said "Go!" each was to try to bring down the other's hand
[Counterparts] [3065] on to the table. Farrington looked very serious and determined.
[Counterparts] [3068] opponent's hand slowly down on to the table. Farrington's dark
[Counterparts] [3072] "You're not to put the weight of your body behind it. Play fair," he
[Counterparts] [3080] forehead, and the pallor of Weathers' complexion changed to
[Counterparts] [3083] on to the table. There was a murmur of applause from the
[Counterparts] [3101] waiting for the little Sandymount tram to take him home. He was
[Counterparts] [3106] he had not even got drunk. He began to feel thirsty again and he
[Counterparts] [3107] longed to be back again in the hot reeking public-house. He had
[Counterparts] [3115] returning to his home. When he went in by the side- door he found
[Counterparts] [3145] lit the lamp. He began to mimic his son's flat accent, saying half to
[Counterparts] [3151] "I'm going... to cook it, pa," said the little boy.
[Counterparts] [3153] The man jumped up furiously and pointed to the fire.
[Counterparts] [3155] "On that fire! You let the fire out! By God, I'll teach you to do that
[Counterparts] [3158] He took a step to the door and seized the walking-stick which was
[Counterparts] [3161] "I'll teach you to let the fire out!" he said, rolling up his sleeve in
[Counterparts] [3162] order to give his arm free play.
[Clay] [3182] THE matron had given her leave to go out as soon as the women's
[Clay] [3183] tea was over and Maria looked forward to her evening out. The
[Clay] [3188] that they had been cut into long thick even slices and were ready to
[Clay] [3195] always succeeded in making peace. One day the matron had said to
[Clay] [3202] wouldn't do to the dummy who had charge of the irons if it wasn't
[Clay] [3206] able to get away before seven. From Ballsbridge to the Pillar,
[Clay] [3207] twenty minutes; from the Pillar to Drumcondra, twenty minutes;
[Clay] [3208] and twenty minutes to buy the things. She would be there before
[Clay] [3211] because Joe had brought it to her five years before when he and
[Clay] [3212] Alphy had gone to Belfast on a Whit-Monday trip. In the purse
[Clay] [3219] Often he had wanted her to go and live with them;-but she would
[Clay] [3221] with her) and she had become accustomed to the life of the
[Clay] [3228] Dublin by Lamplight laundry, and she liked it. She used to have
[Clay] [3231] people to live with. Then she had her plants in the conservatory
[Clay] [3233] wax-plants and, whenever anyone came to visit her, she always
[Clay] [3236] the matron was such a nice person to deal with, so genteel.
[Clay] [3239] women's room and began to pull the big bell. In a few minutes the
[Clay] [3240] women began to come in by twos and threes, wiping their
[Clay] [3248] was sure to get the ring and, though Fleming had said that for so
[Clay] [3249] many Hallow Eves, Maria had to laugh and say she didn't want any
[Clay] [3255] sup of porter to drink it in. And Maria laughed again till the tip of
[Clay] [3261] the cook and the dummy had begun to clear away the tea- things!
[Clay] [3264] seven to six. Then she took off her working skirt and her
[Clay] [3267] and, as she stood before the mirror, she thought of how she used to
[Clay] [3275] had to sit on the little stool at the end of the car, facing all the
[Clay] [3277] mind all she was going to do and thought how much better it was
[Clay] [3278] to be independent and to have your own money in your pocket.
[Clay] [3282] they were boys together they used to be the best of friends: but
[Clay] [3288] herself attended to. She bought a dozen of mixed penny cakes, and
[Clay] [3290] what else would she buy: she wanted to buy something really nice.
[Clay] [3291] They would be sure to have plenty of apples and nuts. It was hard
[Clay] [3292] to know what to buy and all she could think of was cake. She
[Clay] [3293] decided to buy some plumcake but Downes's plumcake had not
[Clay] [3294] enough almond icing on top of it so she went over to a shop in
[Clay] [3297] annoyed by her, asked her was it wedding-cake she wanted to buy.
[Clay] [3304] She thought she would have to stand in the Drumcondra tram
[Clay] [3305] because none of the young men seemed to notice her but an elderly
[Clay] [3310] who simply stared straight before them. The gentleman began to
[Clay] [3317] bowed, and he bowed to her and raised his hat and smiled
[Clay] [3319] her tiny head under the rain, she thought how easy it was to know a
[Clay] [3322] Everybody said: "0, here's Maria!" when she came to Joe's house.
[Clay] [3326] cakes to the eldest boy, Alphy, to divide and Mrs. Donnelly said it
[Clay] [3327] was too good of her to bring such a big bag of cakes and made all
[Clay] [3333] mamma, something they would be sure to like, and she began to
[Clay] [3338] looked as if they did not like to eat cakes if they were to be
[Clay] [3349] repeating for her a smart answer which he had made to the
[Clay] [3352] been a very overbearing person to deal with. Joe said he wasn't so
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3358] did they expect Maria to crack nuts without a nutcracker. But
[Clay] [3359] Maria said she didn't like nuts and that they weren't to bother about
[Clay] [3362] prefer that. Maria said she would rather they didn't ask her to take
[Clay] [3368] he spoke a word to his brother again and Maria said she was sorry
[Clay] [3370] was a great shame for him to speak that way of his own flesh and
[Clay] [3373] lose his temper on account of the night it was and asked his wife to
[Clay] [3376] was delighted to see the children so merry and Joe and his wife in
[Clay] [3378] table and then led the children up to the table, blindfold. One got
[Clay] [3381] the blushing girl as much as to say: 0, I know all about it! They
[Clay] [3382] insisted then on blindfolding Maria and leading her up to the table
[Clay] [3383] to see what she would get; and, while they were putting on the
[Clay] [3387] They led her up to the table amid laughing and joking and she put
[Clay] [3388] her hand out in the air as she was told to do. She moved her hand
[Clay] [3394] last Mrs. Donnelly said something very cross to one of the
[Clay] [3395] next-door girls and told her to throw it out at once: that was no
[Clay] [3397] to do it over again: and this time she got the prayer-book.
[Clay] [3403] prayer-book. Maria had never seen Joe so nice to her as he was
[Clay] [3405] were all very good to her.
[Clay] [3410] to get up and stand beside the piano. Mrs. Donnelly bade the
[Clay] [3411] children be quiet and listen to Maria's song. Then she played the
[Clay] [3413] began to sing in a tiny quavering voice. She sang I Dreamt that I
[Clay] [3414] Dwelt, and when she came to the second verse she sang again:
[Clay] [3422] I had riches too great to count; could boast
[Clay] [3428] But no one tried to show her her mistake; and when she had ended
[Clay] [3433] end he had to ask his wife to tell him where the corkscrew was.
[A Painful Case] [3437] MR. JAMES DUFFY lived in Chapelizod because he wished to
[A Painful Case] [3452] wooden shelves were arranged from below upwards according to
[A Painful Case] [3460] from time to time and, in an ironical moment, the headline of an
[A Painful Case] [3461] advertisement for Bile Beans had been pasted on to the first sheet.
[A Painful Case] [3474] a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often
[A Painful Case] [3477] autobiographical habit which led him to compose in his mind from
[A Painful Case] [3478] time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in
[A Painful Case] [3480] alms to beggars and walked firmly, carrying a stout hazel.
[A Painful Case] [3484] midday he went to Dan Burke's and took his lunch--a bottle of
[A Painful Case] [3491] brought him sometimes to an opera or a concert: these were the
[A Painful Case] [3496] relatives at Christmas and escorting them to the cemetery when
[A Painful Case] [3498] sake but conceded nothing further to the conventions which
[A Painful Case] [3499] regulate the civic life. He allowed himself to think that in certain
[A Painful Case] [3509] people to have to sing to empty benches."
[A Painful Case] [3511] He took the remark as an invitation to talk. He was surprised that
[A Painful Case] [3512] she seemed so little awkward. While they talked he tried to fix her
[A Painful Case] [3514] beside her was her daughter he judged her to be a year or so
[A Painful Case] [3527] diverted to become intimate. She alluded once or twice to her
[A Painful Case] [3528] husband but her tone was not such as to make the allusion a
[A Painful Case] [3534] Meeting her a third time by accident he found courage to make an
[A Painful Case] [3538] underhand ways and, finding that they were compelled to meet
[A Painful Case] [3539] stealthily, he forced her to ask him to her house. Captain Sinico
[A Painful Case] [3549] her. She listened to all.
[A Painful Case] [3552] own life. With almost maternal solicitude she urged him to let his
[A Painful Case] [3553] nature open to the full: she became his confessor. He told her that
[A Painful Case] [3563] social revolution, he told her, would be likely to strike Dublin for
[A Painful Case] [3567] asked her, with careful scorn. To compete with phrasemongers,
[A Painful Case] [3568] incapable of thinking consecutively for sixty seconds? To submit
[A Painful Case] [3569] himself to the criticisms of an obtuse middle class which entrusted
[A Painful Case] [3570] its morality to policemen and its fine arts to impresarios?
[A Painful Case] [3572] He went often to her little cottage outside Dublin; often they spent
[A Painful Case] [3575] warm soil about an exotic. Many times she allowed the dark to fall
[A Painful Case] [3580] caught himself listening to the sound of his own voice. He thought
[A Painful Case] [3581] that in her eyes he would ascend to an angelical stature; and, as he
[A Painful Case] [3583] closely to him, he heard the strange impersonal voice which he
[A Painful Case] [3588] passionately and pressed it to her cheek.
[A Painful Case] [3592] wrote to her asking her to meet him. As he did not wish their last
[A Painful Case] [3593] interview to be troubled by the influence of their ruined
[A Painful Case] [3597] to break off their intercourse: every bond, he said, is a bond to
[A Painful Case] [3599] towards the tram; but here she began to tremble so violently that,
[A Painful Case] [3604] Four years passed. Mr. Duffy returned to his even way of life. His
[A Painful Case] [3620] One evening as he was about to put a morsel of corned beef and
[A Painful Case] [3625] glass of water, pushed his plate to one side, doubled the paper
[A Painful Case] [3627] and over again. The cabbage began to deposit a cold white grease
[A Painful Case] [3628] on his plate. The girl came over to him to ask was his dinner not
[A Painful Case] [3635] lonely road which leads from the Parkgate to Chapelizod he
[A Painful Case] [3639] up at once to his bedroom and, taking the paper from his pocket,
[A Painful Case] [3653] deceased lady, while attempting to cross the line, was knocked
[A Painful Case] [3655] thereby sustaining injuries of the head and right side which led to
[A Painful Case] [3661] afterwards brought it to rest in response to loud cries. The train
[A Painful Case] [3664] P. Dunne, railway porter, stated that as the train was about to start
[A Painful Case] [3665] he observed a woman attempting to cross the lines. He ran towards
[A Painful Case] [3667] the buffer of the engine and fell to the ground.
[A Painful Case] [3675] taken to the waiting-room pending the arrival of the ambulance.
[A Painful Case] [3683] sufficient to have caused death in a normal person. Death, in his
[A Painful Case] [3684] opinion, had been probably due to shock and sudden failure of the
[A Painful Case] [3689] taken every precaution to prevent people crossing the lines except
[A Painful Case] [3692] been in the habit of crossing the lines late at night from platform to
[A Painful Case] [3694] he did not think the railway officials were to blame.
[A Painful Case] [3701] ago when his wife began to be rather intemperate in her habits.
[A Painful Case] [3704] of going out at night to buy spirits. She, witness, had often tried to
[A Painful Case] [3705] reason with her mother and had induced her to join a League. She
[A Painful Case] [3712] the railway company to take strong measures to prevent the
[A Painful Case] [3713] possibility of similar accidents in the future. No blame attached to
[A Painful Case] [3722] beside the empty distillery and from time to time a light appeared
[A Painful Case] [3724] narrative of her death revolted him and it revolted him to think that
[A Painful Case] [3725] he had ever spoken to her of what he held sacred. The threadbare
[A Painful Case] [3727] a reporter won over to conceal the details of a commonplace
[A Painful Case] [3732] to be filled by the barman. Just God, what an end! Evidently she
[A Painful Case] [3733] had been unfit to live, without any strength of purpose, an easy
[A Painful Case] [3734] prey to habits, one of the wrecks on which civilisation has been
[A Painful Case] [3741] As the light failed and his memory began to wander he thought her
[A Painful Case] [3745] crept into the sleeves of his coat. When he came to the
[A Painful Case] [3749] The proprietor served him obsequiously but did not venture to talk.
[A Painful Case] [3763] realised that she was dead, that she had ceased to exist, that she
[A Painful Case] [3764] had become a memory. He began to feel ill at ease. He asked
[A Painful Case] [3767] her openly. He had done what seemed to him best. How was he to
[A Painful Case] [3770] life would be lonely too until he, too, died, ceased to exist, became
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[A Painful Case] [3777] the darkness. At moments he seemed to feel her voice touch his
[A Painful Case] [3778] ear, her hand touch his. He stood still to listen. Why had he
[A Painful Case] [3779] withheld life from her? Why had he sentenced her to death? He
[A Painful Case] [3780] felt his moral nature falling to pieces.
[A Painful Case] [3788] had been outcast from life's feast. One human being had seemed to
[A Painful Case] [3790] sentenced her to ignominy, a death of shame. He knew that the
[A Painful Case] [3793] feast. He turned his eyes to the grey gleaming river, winding along
[A Painful Case] [3801] pounding in his ears. He began to doubt the reality of what
[A Painful Case] [3803] to die away. He could not feel her near him in the darkness nor her
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3813] but, as he set himself to fan the fire again, his crouching shadow
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3825] tobacco for a cigarette into a shapely cylinder but when spoken to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3826] he undid his handiwork meditatively. Then he began to roll the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3828] to lick the paper.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3854] Mr. O'Connor had been engaged by Tierney's agent to canvass one
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3864] taking up the piece of cardboard again, began to fan the fire slowly
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3867] "Ah, yes," he said, continuing, "it's hard to know what way to bring
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3868] up children. Now who'd think he'd turn out like that! I sent him to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3870] goes boosing about. I tried to make him someway decent."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3875] stick to his back and beat him while I could stand over him--as I
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3883] I've a sup taken. What's the world coming to when sons speaks that
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3884] way to their fathers?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3890] "Why don't you put him to something?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3915] "Well, Mat," he said to Mr. O'Connor, "how goes it?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3919] which he thrust one after the other into the fire and carried to the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3929] "Not yet," said Mr. O'Connor. "I hope to God he'll not leave us in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3942] The old man returned to his seat by the fire, saying:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3952] Hasn't the working-man as good a right to be in the Corporation as
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3954] always hat in hand before any fellow with a handle to his name?
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3960] He goes in to represent the labour classes. This fellow you're
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3961] working for only wants to get some job or other."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3969] working-man is not going to drag the honour of Dublin in the mud
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3970] to please a German monarch."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3974] "Don't you know they want to present an address of welcome to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3976] kowtowing to a foreign king?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3987] The three men fell silent. The old man began to rake more cinders
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3992] "If this man was alive," he said, pointing to the leaf, "we'd have no
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4002] over quickly to the fire, rubbing his hands as if he intended to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4012] He nodded curtly to Mr. Hynes and sat down on the chair which
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4017] "Yes," said Mr. O'Connor, beginning to search his pockets for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4027] going to vote.' But I think he'll be all right."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4034] Mr. Henchy began to snuffle and to rub his hands over the fire at a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4052] pay up like a man instead of: 'O, now, Mr. Henchy, I must speak to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4060] men used to go in on Sunday morning before the houses were open
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4061] to buy a waistcoat or a trousers--moya! But Tricky Dicky's little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4069] expect us to work for him if he won't stump up?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4071] "I can't help it," said Mr. Henchy. "I expect to find the bailiffs in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4075] mantelpiece with the aid of his shoulders, made ready to leave.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4131] --you know the patriot I'm alluding to?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4138] and thank the Almighty Christ he had a country to sell."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4146] body and it was impossible to say whether he wore a clergyman's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4152] He opened his very long mouth suddenly to express
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4154] blue eyes to express pleasure and surprise.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4175] candlesticks, went to the door to light him downstairs.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4200] "Fanning and himself seem to me very thick. They're often in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4211] "Is he attached to any chapel or church or institution or---"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4228] "Well, I couldn't go over while he was talking to Alderman
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4230] little matter I was speaking to you about....' 'That'll be all right, Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4239] must owe the City Fathers money nowadays if you want to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4258] than some of them. I was talking one day to old Keegan, the porter.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4262] me? Now, I declare to God I didn't believe him."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4280] The old man helped the boy to transfer the bottles from the basket
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4281] to the table and counted the full tally. After the transfer the boy put
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4290] "I was told to ask for the bottles."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4294] "Here, boy!" said Mr. Henchy, "will you run over to O'Farrell's and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4295] ask him to lend us a corkscrew--for Mr. Henchy, say. Tell him we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4298] The boy went out and Mr. Henchy began to rub his hands
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4316] to the boy:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4322] The old man opened another bottle grudgingly, and handed it to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4330] "Here's my best respects, sir, to Mr. Henchy," drank the contents,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4352] hasn't a word to throw to a dog. He stands and looks at the people
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4356] whose blue serge clothes seemed to be in danger of falling from
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4363] "Hello, Crofton!" said Mr. Henchy to the fat man. "Talk of the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4385] He took two bottles from the table and, carrying them to the fire,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4388] table, pushed his hat towards the nape of his neck and began to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4397] sufficient in itself, was that he had nothing to say; the second
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4401] two evils, given their support to the Nationalist candidate, he had
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4402] been engaged to work for Mr. Tiemey.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4405] out of Mr. Lyons' bottle. Mr. Lyons jumped off the table, went to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4406] the fire, took his bottle and carried it back to the table.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4419] to his own advantage to keep down the rates? He's a prominent and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4421] belong to any party, good, bad, or indifferent.' That's the way to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4422] talk to 'em."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4424] "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4427] "Listen to me," said Mr. Henchy. "What we want in thus country,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4428] as I said to old Ward, is capital. The King's coming here will mean
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4439] it. Here's this chap come to the throne after his old mother keeping
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4442] and no damn nonsense about him. He just says to himself: 'The old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4443] one never went to see these wild Irish. By Christ, I'll go myself and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4465] he did Parnell was a fit man to lead us? And why, then, would we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4470] gone--even the Conservatives," he added, turning to Mr. Crofton.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4473] got up from his box and went to the fire. As he returned with his
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4502] renege him. By God, I'll say for you, Joe! No, by God, you stuck to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4509] Crofton? Listen to this now: splendid thing."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4513] Mr. Hynes did not seem to remember at once the piece to which
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4523] off his hat, laid it on the table and stood up. He seemed to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4532] He cleared his throat once or twice and then began to recite:
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4540] He raised to glory from the mire;
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4553] To clutch that idol, treachery
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4557] Betrayed him to the rabble-rout
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4561] To befoul and smear the exalted name
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4564] Nobly undaunted to the last,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4570] The peaks of glory to attain.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4577] Pledge in the cup she lifts to Joy
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4588] seem to have heard the invitation.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4591] papers and pouch the better to hide his emotion.
[A Mother] [4611] made few friends at school. When she came to the age of marriage
[A Mother] [4612] she was sent out to many houses, where her playing and ivory
[A Mother] [4614] accomplishments, waiting for some suitor to brave it and offer her
[A Mother] [4616] and she gave them no encouragement, trying to console her
[A Mother] [4619] began to loosen their tongues about her, she silenced them by
[A Mother] [4626] romantic ideas away. He was sober, thrifty and pious; he went to
[A Mother] [4628] But she never weakened in her religion and was a good wife to
[A Mother] [4630] ever so slightly he stood up to take his leave and, when his cough
[A Mother] [4634] daughters a dowry of one hundred pounds each when they came to
[A Mother] [4635] the age of twenty-four. He sent the older daughter, Kathleen, to a
[A Mother] [4638] Kearney found occasion to say to some friend:
[A Mother] [4640] "My good man is packing us off to Skerries for a few weeks."
[A Mother] [4644] When the Irish Revival began to be appreciable Mrs. Kearney
[A Mother] [4645] determined to take advantage of her daughter's name and brought
[A Mother] [4646] an Irish teacher to the house. Kathleen and her sister sent Irish
[A Mother] [4647] picture postcards to their friends and these friends sent back other
[A Mother] [4649] went with his family to the pro-cathedral, a little crowd of people
[A Mother] [4654] crossing of so man hands, and said good-bye to one another in
[A Mother] [4655] Irish. Soon the name of Miss Kathleen Kearney began to be heard
[A Mother] [4660] to her and proposed that her daughter should be the accompanist at
[A Mother] [4661] a series of four grand concerts which his Society was going to give
[A Mother] [4666] contract was drawn up by which Kathleen was to receive eight
[A Mother] [4673] knew that the first tenor would not like to come on after Mr.
[A Mother] [4674] Meade's comic turn. To keep the audience continually diverted she
[A Mother] [4676] Holohan called to see her every day to have her advice on some
[A Mother] [4687] blush-pink charmeuse in Brown Thomas's to let into the front of
[A Mother] [4690] two-shilling tickets for the final concert and sent them to those
[A Mother] [4691] friends who could not be trusted to come otherwise. She forgot
[A Mother] [4692] nothing, and, thanks to her, everything that was to be done was
[A Mother] [4695] The concerts were to be on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and
[A Mother] [4703] was twenty minutes to eight.
[A Mother] [4705] In the dressing-room behind the stage she was introduced to the
[A Mother] [4710] while he was talking to her, he chewed one end of it into a moist
[A Mother] [4711] pulp. He seemed to bear disappointments lightly. Mr. Holohan
[A Mother] [4714] glanced from time to time at the mirror and rolled and unrolled
[A Mother] [4716] the hall began to express their desire to be entertained. Mr.
[A Mother] [4723] stare of contempt, and then said to her daughter encouragingly:
[A Mother] [4728] asked him to tell her what it meant. Mr. Holohan did not know
[A Mother] [4736] committee, he said, had decided to let the first three concerts go as
[A Mother] [4740] and fewer, she began to regret that she had put herself to any
[A Mother] [4743] very much. However, she said nothing and waited to see how it
[A Mother] [4750] dress rehearsal. Mr. Fitzpatrick seemed to enjoy himself; he was
[A Mother] [4752] conduct. He stood at the edge of the screen, from time to time
[A Mother] [4755] learned that the Friday concert was to be abandoned and that the
[A Mother] [4756] committee was going to move heaven and earth to secure a
[A Mother] [4765] Mr. Holohan seemed to be in a hurry; he advised her to speak to
[A Mother] [4766] Mr. Fitzpatrick. Mrs. Kearney was now beginning to be alarmed.
[A Mother] [4769] according to the terms of the contract, she should receive the sum
[A Mother] [4772] quickly, seemed unable to resolve the difficulty and said that he
[A Mother] [4774] began to flutter in her cheek and she had all she could do to keep
[A Mother] [4779] But she knew that it would not be ladylike to do that: so she was
[A Mother] [4787] well to tell her husband part of her suspicions. He listened
[A Mother] [4799] to begin. By ill luck it was a rainy evening. Mrs. Kearney placed
[A Mother] [4805] to whom Mrs. Kearney explained that she wanted to see one of the
[A Mother] [4820] Mrs. Kearney had to go back to the dressing-room.
[A Mother] [4840] jealousy with an ebullient friendliness. It was his humour to have
[A Mother] [4841] people know what an ordeal a concert was to him. Therefore when
[A Mother] [4842] he saw Mr. Duggan he went over to him and asked:
[A Mother] [4852] Mrs. Kearney passed by these two young men and went to the edge
[A Mother] [4853] of the screen to view the house. The seats were being filled up
[A Mother] [4855] back and spoke to her husband privately. Their conversation was
[A Mother] [4857] stood chatting to one of her Nationalist friends, Miss Healy, the
[A Mother] [4863] "I wonder where did they dig her up," said Kathleen to Miss Healy.
[A Mother] [4866] Miss Healy had to smile. Mr. Holohan limped into the
[A Mother] [4871] from time to time changing the direction of her startled gaze. The
[A Mother] [4878] Mrs. Kearney brought her daughter over to them, and talked to
[A Mother] [4879] them amiably. She wanted to be on good terms with them but,
[A Mother] [4880] while she strove to be polite, her eyes followed Mr. Holohan in his
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4886] They went down to a discreet part of the corridor. Mrs Kearney
[A Mother] [4887] asked him when was her daughter going to be paid. Mr. Holohan
[A Mother] [4890] signed a contract for eight guineas and she would have to be paid.
[A Mother] [4895] it's my business and I mean to see to it."
[A Mother] [4897] "You'd better speak to Mr. Fitzpatrick," said Mr. Holohan
[A Mother] [4901] Kearney. "I have my contract, and I intend to see that it is carried
[A Mother] [4904] When she came back to the dressing-room her cheeks were slightly
[A Mother] [4908] O'Madden Burke. The Freeman man had come in to say that he
[A Mother] [4909] could not wait for the concert as he had to report the lecture which
[A Mother] [4911] were to leave the report for him at the Freeman office and he
[A Mother] [4915] not intended to stay a moment because concerts and artistes bored
[A Mother] [4918] enough to suspect one reason for her politeness but young enough
[A Mother] [4919] in spirit to turn the moment to account. The warmth, fragrance and
[A Mother] [4920] colour of her body appealed to his senses. He was pleasantly
[A Mother] [4926] "O'Madden Burke will write the notice," he explained to Mr.
[A Mother] [4936] staircase and came to a secluded room where one of the stewards
[A Mother] [4946] Kearney was speaking so animatedly to her husband that he had to
[A Mother] [4947] ask her to lower her voice. The conversation of the others in the
[A Mother] [4959] moment Mr. Holohan perceived the hush. He went over to Mrs.
[A Mother] [4968] audience was clapping and stamping. He appealed to Mr Kearney
[A Mother] [4969] and to Kathleen. But Mr. Kearney continued to stroke his beard
[A Mother] [4977] somewhat painful Miss Healy said to the baritone:
[A Mother] [4983] his head and began to count the links of the gold chain which was
[A Mother] [4984] extended across his waist, smiling and humming random notes to
[A Mother] [4985] observe the effect on the frontal sinus. From time to time everyone
[A Mother] [4988] The noise in the auditorium had risen to a clamour when Mr.
[A Mother] [4997] But Kathleen gathered in her skirt and said: "Now. Mr. Bell," to
[A Mother] [5005] pronunciation which she believed lent elegance to her singing. She
[A Mother] [5021] think of Mrs. Kearney's conduct. He did not like to say anything.
[A Mother] [5022] He had been paid his money and wished to be at peace with men.
[A Mother] [5025] as to what should be done when the interval came.
[A Mother] [5031] Mr. Bell, Miss Healy and the young lady who had to recite the
[A Mother] [5036] They thought they had only a girl to deal with and that therefore,
[A Mother] [5038] their mistake. They wouldn't have dared to have treated her like
[A Mother] [5040] her rights: she wouldn't be fooled. If they didn't pay her to the last
[A Mother] [5043] to the second tenor who said he thought she had not been well
[A Mother] [5044] treated. Then she appealed to Miss Healy. Miss Healy wanted to
[A Mother] [5045] join the other group but she did not like to do so because she was a
[A Mother] [5046] great friend of Kathleen's and the Kearneys had often invited her to
[A Mother] [5050] Holohan went over to Mrs. Kearney and told her that the other four
[A Mother] [5072] "Might I, indeed?... And when I ask when my daughter is going to
[A Mother] [5077] "You must speak to the secretary. It's not my business. I'm a great
[A Mother] [5087] the second part to begin in the hope that the secretaries would
[A Mother] [5088] approach her. But Miss Healy had kindly consented to play one or
[A Mother] [5089] two accompaniments. Mrs. Kearney had to stand aside to allow the
[A Mother] [5090] baritone and his accompanist to pass up to the platform. She stood
[A Mother] [5093] and said to her husband:
[A Mother] [5105] Kathleen followed her mother meekly. Mr. Holohan began to pace
[A Mother] [5106] up and down the room, in order to cool himself for he his skin on
[Grace] [5116] TWO GENTLEMEN who were in the lavatory at the time tried to
[Grace] [5154] struggling to look in through the glass panels.
[Grace] [5156] The manager at once began to narrate what he knew. The costable,
[Grace] [5158] head slowly to right and left and from the manager to the person
[Grace] [5159] on the floor, as if he feared to be the victim some delusion. Then
[Grace] [5161] licked the lead of his pencil and made ready to indite. He asked in
[Grace] [5168] called for water. The constable knelt down also to help. The young
[Grace] [5174] faces and then, understanding, strove to rise to his feet.
[Grace] [5178] "Sha,'s nothing," said the injured man, trying to stand up.
[Grace] [5180] He was helped to his feet. The manager said something about a
[Grace] [5186] The man, without answering, began to twirl the ends of his
[Grace] [5192] The man said they were to get a cab for him. While the point was
[Grace] [5202] then turned to the constable, saying:
[Grace] [5220] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir," said the injured man.
[Grace] [5229] in to the laneway. The manager brought the constable to the stairs
[Grace] [5230] to inspect the scene of the accident. They agreed that the
[Grace] [5232] to the counter and a curate set about removing the traces of blood
[Grace] [5238] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir. I hope we'll 'eet again. 'y na'e is
[Grace] [5245] They shook hands. Mr. Kernan was hoisted on to the car and,
[Grace] [5246] while Mr. Power was giving directions to the carman, he expressed
[Grace] [5247] his gratitude to the young man and regretted that they could not
[Grace] [5255] huddled together with cold. His friend asked him to tell how the
[Grace] [5266] the car brought the match to and from the opened mouth. The
[Grace] [5268] minute piece of the tongue seemed to have been bitten off. The
[Grace] [5283] to allow him a little office in Crowe Street, on the window blind of
[Grace] [5290] spat it forth into the grate. Then he paused to judge.
[Grace] [5301] Kernan was helped into the house. His wife put him to bed while
[Grace] [5303] they went to school and what book they were in. The children--
[Grace] [5313] Mr. Power was careful to explain to her that he was not
[Grace] [5321] long as he has money in his pocket to keep him out from his wife
[Grace] [5322] and family. Nice friends! Who was he with tonight, I'd like to
[Grace] [5327] "I'm so sorry," she continued, "that I've nothing in the house to
[Grace] [5328] offer you. But if you wait a minute I'll send round to Fogarty's, at
[Grace] [5333] "We were waiting for him to come home with the money. He
[Grace] [5334] never seems to think he has a home at all."
[Grace] [5337] a new leaf. I'll talk to Martin. He's the man. We'll come here one of
[Grace] [5340] She saw him to the door. The carman was stamping up and down
[Grace] [5341] the footpath, and swinging his arms to warm himself.
[Grace] [5343] "It's very kind of you to bring him home," she said.
[Grace] [5347] He got up on the car. As it drove off he raised his hat to her gaily.
[Grace] [5363] with her husband by waltzing with him to Mr. Power's
[Grace] [5365] to her a not ungallant figure: and she still hurried to the chapel
[Grace] [5372] irksome and, later on, when she was beginning to find it
[Grace] [5374] presented to her no insuperable difficulties and for twenty-five
[Grace] [5377] the other was clerk to a tea- merchant in Belfast. They were good
[Grace] [5381] Mr. Kernan sent a letter to his office next day and remained in bed.
[Grace] [5384] dutifully whenever he was sick and always tried to make him eat a
[Grace] [5386] since the boys had grown up, and she knew that he would walk to
[Grace] [5387] the end of Thomas Street and back again to book even a small
[Grace] [5390] Two nights after, his friends came to see him. She brought them up
[Grace] [5391] to his bedroom, the air of which was impregnated with a personal
[Grace] [5396] them resemble warm cinders. He apologised to his guests for the
[Grace] [5402] disclosed to Mrs. Kernan in the parlour. The idea been Mr.
[Grace] [5403] Power's, but its development was entrusted to Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5405] converted to the Catholic faith at the time of his marriage, he had
[Grace] [5421] informed. His friends bowed to his opinions and considered that
[Grace] [5424] When the plot had been disclosed to her, Mrs. Kernan had said:
[Grace] [5431] She was tempted to see a curious appropriateness in his accident
[Grace] [5432] and, but that she did not wish to seem bloody-minded, would have
[Grace] [5439] was bounded by her kitchen, but, if she was put to it, she could
[Grace] [5442] The gentlemen began to talk of the accident. Mr. Cunningham said
[Grace] [5455] wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play
[Grace] [5458] driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland
[Grace] [5462] Sub-Sheriff, and he had recently become secretary to the City
[Grace] [5467] feel as if I wanted to retch off."
[Grace] [5486] "I'm very much obliged to you, old man," said the invalid.
[Grace] [5510] his fellow-travellers had never consented to overlook his origin.
[Grace] [5512] money to workmen at usurious interest. Later on he had become
[Grace] [5521] "I wonder where did he go to," said Mr. Kernan.
[Grace] [5523] He wished the details of the incident to remain vague. He wished
[Grace] [5524] his friends to think there had been some mistake, that Mr. Harford
[Grace] [5539] "Yes, yes," said Mr. Kernan, trying to remember. "I remember now
[Grace] [5552] made a crusade in search of valises and portmanteaus to enable
[Grace] [5553] Mrs. M'Coy to fulfil imaginary engagements in the country. More
[Grace] [5559] conscious of his citizenship, wished to live with his city on terms
[Grace] [5563] "Is this what we pay rates for?" he asked. "To feed and clothe these
[Grace] [5576] Everyone laughed. Mr. M'Coy, who wanted to enter the
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5582] you know, to drill. The sergeant makes them stand in a row against
[Grace] [5590] room and the poor devils have to try and catch it on their plates:
[Grace] [5594] still. He talked of writing a letter to the papers.
[Grace] [5607] "It's better to have nothing to say to them," said Mr. M'Coy. "That's
[Grace] [5615] Mr. Power stood up to officiate, offering her his chair. She
[Grace] [5618] prepared to leave the room. Her husband called out to her:
[Grace] [5622] "O, you! The back of my hand to you!" said Mrs. Kernan tartly.
[Grace] [5645] sure to be crammed to the doors."
[Grace] [5653] There was a short silence. Mr. Kernan waited to see whether he
[Grace] [5670] "To tell you the truth, Tom, we're going to make a retreat."
[Grace] [5673] --we're all going to wash the pot."
[Grace] [5680] charity and turning to Mr. Power. "Own up now!"
[Grace] [5686] "So we're going to wash the pot together," said Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5688] A thought seemed to strike him. He turned suddenly to the invalid
[Grace] [5691] "D'ye know what, Tom, has just occurred to me? You night join in
[Grace] [5697] to his mind, but, understanding that some spiritual agencies were
[Grace] [5698] about to concern themselves on his behalf, he thought he owed it
[Grace] [5699] to his dignity to show a stiff neck. He took no part in the
[Grace] [5708] next to the Pope."
[Grace] [5711] well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit. They're the boyos
[Grace] [5717] Order. Every other order of the Church had to be reformed at some
[Grace] [5750] Kernan seemed to be weighing something in his mind. He was
[Grace] [5803] remember Crofton saying to me when we came out----"
[Grace] [5831] Mrs. Kernan came to the door of the bedroom and announced:
[Grace] [5845] financial condition had constrained him to tie himself to
[Grace] [5883] that is, Cross upon Cross--to show the difference between their
[Grace] [5902] M'Coy's example, "when we went to the penny-a-week school."
[Grace] [5904] "There was many a good man went to the penny-a-week school
[Grace] [5926] wonderful when you come to think of it?"
[Grace] [5930] "As the poet says: Great minds are very near to madness," said Mr.
[Grace] [5933] Mr. Kernan seemed to be troubled in mind. He made an effort to
[Grace] [5939] old popes--not exactly ... you know... up to the knocker?"
[Grace] [5959] others to a little more. Mr. M'Coy, seeing that there was not
[Grace] [5960] enough to go round, pleaded that he had not finished his first
[Grace] [6025] He turned towards his wife to be confirmed.
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6045] There was a pause again. Mr. Power turned to Mrs. Kernan and
[Grace] [6048] "Well, Mrs. Kernan, we're going to make your man here a good
[Grace] [6053] "We're all going to make a retreat together and confess our sins--
[Grace] [6058] Mrs. Kernan thought it would be wiser to conceal her satisfaction.
[Grace] [6061] "I pity the poor priest that has to listen to your tale."
[Grace] [6079] "All we have to do," said Mr. Cunningham, "is to stand up with
[Grace] [6096] "Listen to that!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6099] an effect on his audience and continuing to shake his head to and
[Grace] [6129] unsuccessfully to find a place in the bench with the others, and,
[Grace] [6131] tried unsuccessfully to make comic remarks. As these had not been
[Grace] [6133] decorous atmosphere and even he began to respond to the religious
[Grace] [6135] attention to Mr. Harford, the moneylender, who sat some distance
[Grace] [6136] off, and to Mr. Fanning, the registration agent and mayor maker of
[Grace] [6138] of the newly elected councillors of the ward. To the right sat old
[Grace] [6145] began to feel more at home. His hat, which had been rehabilitated
[Grace] [6151] with a white surplice, was observed to be struggling into the pulpit.
[Grace] [6161] settled again on its benches. Mr. Kernan restored his hat to its
[Grace] [6162] original position on his knee and presented an attentive face to the
[Grace] [6173] one of the most difficult texts in all the Scriptures, he said, to
[Grace] [6174] interpret properly. It was a text which might seem to the casual
[Grace] [6176] Jesus Christ. But, he told his hearers, the text had seemed to him
[Grace] [6177] specially adapted for the guidance of those whose lot it was to lead
[Grace] [6178] the life of the world and who yet wished to lead that life not in the
[Grace] [6182] not called to the religious life, that by far the vast majority were
[Grace] [6183] forced to live in the world, and, to a certain extent, for the world:
[Grace] [6184] and in this sentence He designed to give them a word of counsel,
[Grace] [6190] no extravagant purpose; but as a man of the world speaking to his
[Grace] [6191] fellow-men. He came to speak to business men and he would
[Grace] [6192] speak to them in a businesslike way. If he might use the metaphor,
[Grace] [6194] every one of his hearers to open his books, the books of his
[Grace] [6200] had from time to time, our temptations: we might have, we all had,
[Grace] [6202] hearers. And that was: to be straight and manly with God. If their
[Grace] [6203] accounts tallied in every point to say:
[Grace] [6207] But if, as might happen, there were some discrepancies, to admit
[Grace] [6208] the truth, to be frank and say like a man:
[The Dead] [6219] than the wheezy hall-door bell clanged again and she had to
[The Dead] [6220] scamper along the bare hallway to let in another guest. It was well
[The Dead] [6221] for her she had not to attend to the ladies also. But Miss Kate and
[The Dead] [6225] other to the head of the stairs, peering down over the banisters and
[The Dead] [6226] calling down to Lily to ask her who had come.
[The Dead] [6229] Everybody who knew them came to it, members of the family, old
[The Dead] [6236] to live with them in the dark, gaunt house on Usher's Island, the
[The Dead] [6243] Rooms. Many of her pupils belonged to the better-class families on
[The Dead] [6246] leading soprano in Adam and Eve's, and Kate, being too feeble to
[The Dead] [6247] go about much, gave music lessons to beginners on the old square
[The Dead] [6256] Of course, they had good reason to be fussy on such a night. And
[The Dead] [6261] influence; and when he was like that it was sometimes very hard to
[The Dead] [6264] every two minutes to the banisters to ask Lily had Gabriel or
[The Dead] [6267] "O, Mr. Conroy," said Lily to Gabriel when she opened the door
[The Dead] [6272] here takes three mortal hours to dress herself."
[The Dead] [6275] Lily led his wife to the foot of the stairs and called out:
[The Dead] [6287] went upstairs, laughing, to the ladies' dressing-room. A light fringe
[The Dead] [6296] She had preceded him into the pantry to help him off with his
[The Dead] [6301] child and used to sit on the lowest step nursing a rag doll.
[The Dead] [6307] moment to the piano and then glanced at the girl, who was folding
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6315] "O, then," said Gabriel gaily, "I suppose we'll be going to your
[The Dead] [6329] pushed upwards even to his forehead, where it scattered itself in a
[The Dead] [6349] "Christmas-time! Christmas-time!" said Gabriel, almost trotting to
[The Dead] [6350] the stairs and waving his hand to her in deprecation.
[The Dead] [6357] finish, listening to the skirts that swept against it and to the
[The Dead] [6359] sudden retort. It had cast a gloom over him which he tried to dispel
[The Dead] [6368] would only make himself ridiculous by quoting poetry to them
[The Dead] [6372] tone. His whole speech was a mistake from first to last, an utter
[The Dead] [6391] "Gretta tells me you're not going to take a cab back to Monkstown
[The Dead] [6394] "No," said Gabriel, turning to his wife, "we had quite enough of
[The Dead] [6412] him do the dumb-bells, and forcing Eva to eat the stirabout. The
[The Dead] [6418] dress to her face and hair. The two aunts laughed heartily, too, for
[The Dead] [6423] to put them on, but I wouldn't. The next thing he'll buy me will be
[The Dead] [6455] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate, "by far the best thing to do. And the
[The Dead] [6461] "To be sure," said Aunt Kate again. "What a comfort it is to have a
[The Dead] [6466] Gabriel was about to ask his aunt some questions on this point, but
[The Dead] [6467] she broke off suddenly to gaze after her sister, who had wandered
[The Dead] [6487] Gabriel went to the stairs and listened over the banisters. He could
[The Dead] [6491] "It's such a relief," said Aunt Kate to Mrs. Conroy, "that Gabriel is
[The Dead] [6512] end to end, and on these Aunt Julia and the caretaker were
[The Dead] [6519] Mr. Browne led his charges thither and invited them all, in jest, to
[The Dead] [6522] them. Then he asked one of the young men to move aside, and,
[The Dead] [6530] ladies laughed in musical echo to his pleasantry, swaying their
[The Dead] [6531] bodies to and fro, with nervous jerks of their shoulders. The
[The Dead] [6541] to have said: 'Now, Mary Grimes, if I don't take it, make me take it,
[The Dead] [6549] that he was ignored, turned promptly to the two young men who
[The Dead] [6568] pleasure, and Mary Jane turned to Miss Daly.
[The Dead] [6576] get him to sing later on. All Dublin is raving about him."
[The Dead] [6580] As the piano had twice begun the prelude to the first figure Mary
[The Dead] [6588] Julia, who was carrying in a column of table-napkins, turned to her
[The Dead] [6610] the sideboard, crossed the room on rather shaky legs and began to
[The Dead] [6611] repeat in an undertone the story he had just told to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6613] "He's not so bad, is he?" said Aunt Kate to Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6624] Before leaving the room with Gabriel she signalled to Mr. Browne
[The Dead] [6625] by frowning and shaking her forefinger in warning to and fro. Mr.
[The Dead] [6626] Browne nodded in answer and, when she had gone, said to Freddy
[The Dead] [6629] "Now, then, Teddy, I'm going to fill you out a good glass of
[The Dead] [6630] lemonade just to buck you up."
[The Dead] [6634] Malins' attention to a disarray in his dress, filled out and handed
[The Dead] [6642] glass, began to rub the knuckles of his left fist backwards and
[The Dead] [6647] piece, full of runs and difficult passages, to the hushed
[The Dead] [6650] the other listeners, though they had begged Mary Jane to play
[The Dead] [6652] refreshment-room to stand in the doorway at the sound of the
[The Dead] [6654] only persons who seemed to follow the music were Mary Jane
[The Dead] [6657] Aunt Kate standing at her elbow to turn the page.
[The Dead] [6660] under the heavy chandelier, wandered to the wall above the piano.
[The Dead] [6664] she was a girl. Probably in the school they had gone to as girls that
[The Dead] [6669] musical talent though Aunt Kate used to call her the brains carrier
[The Dead] [6673] was pointing out something in it to Constantine who, dressed in a
[The Dead] [6676] life. Thanks to her, Constantine was now senior curate in
[The Dead] [6677] Balbrigan and, thanks to her, Gabriel himself had taken his degree
[The Dead] [6679] remembered her sullen opposition to his marriage. Some slighting
[The Dead] [6692] the four young men in the doorway who had gone away to the
[The Dead] [6704] "I have a crow to pluck with you."
[The Dead] [6714] Gabriel coloured and was about to knit his brows, as if he did not
[The Dead] [6721] eyes and trying to smile.
[The Dead] [6723] "Well, I'm ashamed of you," said Miss Ivors frankly. "To say you'd
[The Dead] [6730] almost more welcome than the paltry cheque. He loved to feel the
[The Dead] [6732] every day when his teaching in the college was ended he used to
[The Dead] [6733] wander down the quays to the second-hand booksellers, to
[The Dead] [6734] Hickey's on Bachelor's Walk, to Web's or Massey's on Aston's
[The Dead] [6735] Quay, or to O'Clohissey's in the bystreet. He did not know how to
[The Dead] [6736] meet her charge. He wanted to say that literature was above
[The Dead] [6740] continued blinking his eyes and trying to smile and murmured
[The Dead] [6743] When their turn to cross had come he was still perplexed and
[The Dead] [6755] "O, Mr. Conroy, will you come for an excursion to the Aran Isles
[The Dead] [6756] this summer? We're going to stay there a whole month. It will be
[The Dead] [6757] splendid out in the Atlantic. You ought to come. Mr. Clancy is
[The Dead] [6767] "The fact is," said Gabriel, "I have just arranged to go----"
[The Dead] [6776] "Well, we usually go to France or Belgium or perhaps Germany,"
[The Dead] [6779] "And why do you go to France and Belgium," said Miss Ivors,
[The Dead] [6782] "Well," said Gabriel, "it's partly to keep in touch with the
[The Dead] [6785] "And haven't you your own language to keep in touch with--
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6791] Their neighbours had turned to listen to the cross- examination.
[The Dead] [6792] Gabriel glanced right and left nervously and tried to keep his good
[The Dead] [6796] "And haven't you your own land to visit," continued Miss Ivors,
[The Dead] [6800] "0, to tell you the truth," retorted Gabriel suddenly, "I'm sick of my
[The Dead] [6809] They had to go visiting together and, as he had not answered her,
[The Dead] [6814] Gabriel tried to cover his agitation by taking part in the dance with
[The Dead] [6817] was surprised to feel his hand firmly pressed. She looked at him
[The Dead] [6819] Then, just as the chain was about to start again, she stood on tiptoe
[The Dead] [6824] When the lancers were over Gabriel went away to a remote corner
[The Dead] [6830] married daughter in Glasgow and came to Dublin on a visit once a
[The Dead] [6832] and that the captain had been most attentive to her. She spoke also
[The Dead] [6835] to banish from his mind all memory of the unpleasant incident
[The Dead] [6838] ought not to have answered her like that. But she had no right to
[The Dead] [6840] to make him ridiculous before people, heckling him and staring at
[The Dead] [6846] "Gabriel. Aunt Kate wants to know won't you carve the goose as
[The Dead] [6852] over so that we'll have the table to ourselves."
[The Dead] [6861] "Something like that. I'm trying to get that Mr. D'Arcy to sing. He's
[The Dead] [6864] "There was no row," said Gabriel moodily, "only she wanted me to
[The Dead] [6865] go for a trip to the west of Ireland and I said I wouldn't."
[The Dead] [6869] "O, do go, Gabriel," she cried. "I'd love to see Galway again."
[The Dead] [6873] She looked at him for a moment, then turned to Mrs. Malins and
[The Dead] [6879] Malins, without adverting to the interruption, went on to tell
[The Dead] [6881] scenery. Her son-in-law brought them every year to the lakes and
[The Dead] [6882] they used to go fishing. Her son-in-law was a splendid fisher. One
[The Dead] [6887] near he began to think again about his speech and about the
[The Dead] [6888] quotation. When he saw Freddy Malins coming across the room to
[The Dead] [6895] must be outside! How pleasant it would be to walk out alone, first
[The Dead] [6903] He repeated to himself a phrase he had written in his review: "One
[The Dead] [6904] feels that one is listening to a thought- tormented music." Miss
[The Dead] [6908] to think that she would be at the supper-table, looking up at him
[The Dead] [6910] not be sorry to see him fail in his speech. An idea came into his
[The Dead] [6911] mind and gave him courage. He would say, alluding to Aunt Kate
[The Dead] [6916] generation that is growing up around us seems to me to lack." Very
[The Dead] [6925] longer smiling, half turned so as to pitch her voice fairly into the
[The Dead] [6930] even the smallest of the grace notes. To follow the voice, without
[The Dead] [6931] looking at the singer's face, was to feel and share the excitement of
[The Dead] [6935] colour struggled into Aunt Julia's face as she bent to replace in the
[The Dead] [6938] perched sideways to hear her better, was still applauding when
[The Dead] [6939] everyone else had ceased and talking animatedly to his mother
[The Dead] [6942] across the room to Aunt Julia whose hand he seized and held in
[The Dead] [6954] extended his open hand towards her and said to those who were
[The Dead] [6955] near him in the manner of a showman introducing a prodigy to an
[The Dead] [6961] turned to him and said:
[The Dead] [6978] She turned as if to appeal to the good sense of the others against a
[The Dead] [6992] at all honourable for the pope to turn out the women out of the
[The Dead] [7003] "Now, Aunt Kate, you're giving scandal to Mr. Browne who is of
[The Dead] [7006] Aunt Kate turned to Mr. Browne, who was grinning at this allusion
[The Dead] [7007] to his religion, and said hastily:
[The Dead] [7010] woman and I wouldn't presume to do such a thing. But there's such
[The Dead] [7012] were in Julia's place I'd tell that Father Healey straight up to his
[The Dead] [7021] "So that we had better go to supper," said Mary Jane, "and finish
[The Dead] [7025] and Mary Jane trying to persuade Miss Ivors to stay for supper. But
[The Dead] [7033] "To take a pick itself," said Mary Jane, "after all your dancing."
[The Dead] [7050] really obliged to go."
[The Dead] [7054] "I won't hear of it," she cried. "For goodness' sake go in to your
[The Dead] [7055] suppers and don't mind me. I'm quite well able to take care of
[The Dead] [7064] face, while Mrs. Conroy leaned over the banisters to listen for the
[The Dead] [7066] departure. But she did not seem to be in ill humour: she had gone
[The Dead] [7073] everyone waiting in there, stage to let, and nobody to carve the
[The Dead] [7077] "ready to carve a flock of geese, if necessary."
[The Dead] [7091] celery stalks. In the centre of the table there stood, as sentries to a
[The Dead] [7097] up according to the colours of their uniforms, the first two black,
[The Dead] [7102] looked to the edge of the carver, plunged his fork firmly into the
[The Dead] [7104] liked nothing better than to find himself at the head of a well-laden
[The Dead] [7117] of ham and spiced beef Lily went from guest to guest with a dish
[The Dead] [7128] Gabriel began to carve second helpings as