Dubliners by James Joyce
walked

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

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There are 44 occurrences of the word:   walked

[The Sisters] [137] knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street,
[The Sisters] [171] As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter's words and
[An Encounter] [480] We walked along the North Strand Road till we came to the Vitriol
[An Encounter] [486] boys were too small and so we walked on, the ragged troop
[An Encounter] [552] by the bank slowly. He walked with one hand upon his hip and in
[An Encounter] [560] steps. He walked towards us very slowly, always tapping the
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [751] had to go to carry some of the parcels. We walked through the
[Araby] [821] the window. I left the house in bad humour and walked slowly
[Araby] [891] walked into the centre of the bazaar timidly. A few people were
[Araby] [930] away slowly and walked down the middle of the bazaar. I allowed
[After the Race] [1237] pushed their way through the knot of gazers. They walked
[Two Gallants] [1373] who walked on the verge of the path and was at times obliged to
[Two Gallants] [1445] walked with his hands by his sides, holding himself erect and
[Two Gallants] [1464] walked on through the crowd Corley occasionally turned to smile
[Two Gallants] [1568] They walked along Nassau Street and then turned into Kildare
[Two Gallants] [1579] The two young men walked up the street without speaking, the
[Two Gallants] [1626] Lenehan observed them for a few minutes. Then he walked rapidly
[Two Gallants] [1646] Lenehan walked as far as the Shelbourne Hotel where he halted
[Two Gallants] [1650] Square. As he walked on slowly, timing his pace to theirs, he
[Two Gallants] [1664] He walked listlessly round Stephen's Green and then down Grafton
[Two Gallants] [1714] a good dinner to sit down to. He had walked the streets long
[Two Gallants] [1725] and walked along towards the City Hall. Then he turned into Dame
[Two Gallants] [1740] He turned to the left at the City Markets and walked on into
[A Little Cloud] [2149] feudal arch of the King's Inns, a neat modest figure, and walked
[A Little Cloud] [2173] as he walked boldly forward, the silence that was spread about his
[A Little Cloud] [2669] to scream. He jumped up from his chair and walked hastily up and
[Counterparts] [2786] The man walked heavily towards the door and, as he went out of
[Counterparts] [2807] he walked on furtively on the inner side of the path towards the
[Counterparts] [2972] curling fumes punch. As he walked on he preconsidered the terms
[A Painful Case] [3480] alms to beggars and walked firmly, carrying a stout hazel.
[A Painful Case] [3598] sorrow. When they came out of the Park they walked in silence
[A Painful Case] [3616] the city by tram and every evening walked home from the city after
[A Painful Case] [3632] He walked along quickly through the November twilight, his stout
[A Painful Case] [3774] and gloomy. He entered the Park by the first gate and walked along
[A Painful Case] [3775] under the gaunt trees. He walked through the bleak alleys where
[A Painful Case] [3776] they had walked four years before. She seemed to be near him in
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4001] snuffling nose and very cold ears pushed in the door. He walked
[A Mother] [4604] him Hoppy Holohan. He walked up and down constantly, stood by
[A Mother] [4858] contralto. An unknown solitary woman with a pale face walked
[Grace] [6115] door and, directed by the lay-brother, walked on tiptoe along the
[The Dead] [6344] He walked rapidly towards the door.
[The Dead] [7906] She turned away from the mirror slowly and walked along the
[The Dead] [8144] intruding on her grief, let it fall gently and walked quietly to the