Dubliners by James Joyce
we

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 168 occurrences of the word:   We

[The Sisters] [27] mind. Tiresome old fool! When we knew him first he used to be
[The Sisters] [194] and we three knelt down at the foot of the bed. I pretended to pray
[The Sisters] [201] But no. When we rose and went up to the head of the bed I saw
[The Sisters] [208] We crossed ourselves and came away. In the little room downstairs
[The Sisters] [209] we found Eliza seated in his arm-chair in state. I groped my way
[The Sisters] [218] sofa where she sat down behind her sister. No one spoke: we all
[The Sisters] [245] "That's what the woman we had in to wash him said. She said he
[The Sisters] [259] "Ah, poor James!" she said. "God knows we done all we could, as
[The Sisters] [260] poor as we are--we wouldn't see him want anything while he was
[The Sisters] [267] All the work we had, she and me, getting in the woman to wash
[The Sisters] [308] again where we were all born down in Irishtown and take me and
[The Sisters] [309] Nannie with him. If we could only get one of them new-fangled
[The Sisters] [332] deep revery. We waited respectfully for her to break the silence:
[The Sisters] [357] in his coffin as we had seen him, solemn and truculent in death, an
[An Encounter] [370] and The Halfpenny Marvel . Every evening after school we met in
[An Encounter] [372] brother Leo, the idler, held the loft of the stable while we tried to
[An Encounter] [373] carry it by storm; or we fought a pitched battle on the grass. But,
[An Encounter] [374] however well we fought, we never won siege or battle and all our
[An Encounter] [389] influence, differences of culture and constitution were waived. We
[An Encounter] [433] miching. Each of us saved up sixpence. We were to meet at ten in
[An Encounter] [436] was sick. We arranged to go along the Wharf Road until we came
[An Encounter] [438] Pigeon House. Leo Dillon was afraid we might meet Father Butler
[An Encounter] [440] what would Father Butler be doing out at the Pigeon House. We
[An Encounter] [443] showing them my own sixpence. When we were making the last
[An Encounter] [444] arrangements on the eve we were all vaguely excited. We shook
[An Encounter] [464] clambered up beside me on the bridge. While we were waiting he
[An Encounter] [469] of Father Butler as Old Bunser. We waited on for a quarter of an
[An Encounter] [480] We walked along the North Strand Road till we came to the Vitriol
[An Encounter] [482] began to play the Indian as soon as we were out of public sight. He
[An Encounter] [485] at us, he proposed that we should charge them. I objected that the
[An Encounter] [486] boys were too small and so we walked on, the ragged troop
[An Encounter] [487] screaming after us: "Swaddlers! Swaddlers!" thinking that we were
[An Encounter] [489] the silver badge of a cricket club in his cap. When we came to the
[An Encounter] [490] Smoothing Iron we arranged a siege; but it was a failure because
[An Encounter] [491] you must have at least three. We revenged ourselves on Leo Dillon
[An Encounter] [495] We came then near the river. We spent a long time walking about
[An Encounter] [498] immobility by the drivers of groaning carts. It was noon when we
[An Encounter] [500] their lunches, we bought two big currant buns and sat down to eat
[An Encounter] [501] them on some metal piping beside the river. We pleased ourselves
[An Encounter] [512] We crossed the Liffey in the ferryboat, paying our toll to be
[An Encounter] [514] bag. We were serious to the point of solemnity, but once during the
[An Encounter] [515] short voyage our eyes met and we laughed. When we landed we
[An Encounter] [516] watched the discharging of the graceful threemaster which we had
[An Encounter] [528] When we were tired of this sight we wandered slowly into
[An Encounter] [530] grocers' shops musty biscuits lay bleaching. We bought some
[An Encounter] [531] biscuits and chocolate which we ate sedulously as we wandered
[An Encounter] [533] live. We could find no dairy and so we went into a huckster's shop
[An Encounter] [536] field. We both felt rather tired and when we reached the field we
[An Encounter] [537] made at once for a sloping bank over the ridge of which we could
[An Encounter] [540] It was too late and we were too tired to carry out our project of
[An Encounter] [541] visiting the Pigeon House. We had to be home before four o'clock
[An Encounter] [548] There was nobody but ourselves in the field. When we had lain on
[An Encounter] [555] we used to call a jerry hat with a high crown. He seemed to be
[An Encounter] [558] We followed him with our eyes and saw that when he had gone on
[An Encounter] [564] He stopped when he came level with us and bade us goodday. We
[An Encounter] [571] expressed these sentiments which bored us a little we kept silent.
[An Encounter] [573] we had read the poetry of Thomas Moore or the works of Sir
[An Encounter] [625] slowly away from us towards the near end of the field. We
[An Encounter] [639] We said nothing further to each other. I was still considering
[An Encounter] [650] was going to reply indignantly that we were not National School
[Araby] [715] When the short days of winter came dusk fell before we had well
[Araby] [716] eaten our dinners. When we met in the street the houses had grown
[Araby] [719] their feeble lanterns. The cold air stung us and we played till our
[Araby] [722] houses where we ran the gauntlet of the rough tribes from the
[Araby] [726] the buckled harness. When we returned to the street light from the
[Araby] [728] the corner we hid in the shadow until we had seen him safely
[Araby] [730] brother in to his tea we watched her from our shadow peer up and
[Araby] [731] down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go
[Araby] [732] in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to
[Araby] [743] kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near
[Araby] [751] had to go to carry some of the parcels. We walked through the
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1422] man, I met her by appointment. We vent out to Donnybrook and I
[Two Gallants] [1608] "And after? Where will we meet?"
[A Little Cloud] [2255] you have? I'm taking whisky: better stuff than we get across the
[A Little Cloud] [2418] "Ah, well," said Ignatius Gallaher, "here we are in old jog- along
[A Little Cloud] [2451] "We have one child," he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2465] back. My wife will be delighted to meet you. We can have a little
[A Little Cloud] [2468] "Thanks awfully, old chap," said Ignatius Gallaher, "I'm sorry we
[A Little Cloud] [2474] fellow, clever young chap he is too, and we arranged to go to a
[A Little Cloud] [2483] "Very well," said Little Chandler, "the next time you come we
[A Painful Case] [3585] We cannot give ourselves, it said: we are our own. The end of
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3975] Edward Rex if he comes here next year? What do we want
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4204] We haven't many of them, thank God! but we have a few.... He's an
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4295] ask him to lend us a corkscrew--for Mr. Henchy, say. Tell him we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4408] "I was just telling them, Crofton," said Mr. Henchy, that we got a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4427] "Listen to me," said Mr. Henchy. "What we want in thus country,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4431] idle! Look at all the money there is in the country if we only
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4433] factories. It's capital we want."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4435] "But look here, John," said Mr. O'Connor. "Why should we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4444] see what they're like.' And are we going to insult the man when he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4455] good sportsman. Damn it, can't we Irish play fair?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4463] "What I mean," said Mr. Lyons, "is we have our ideals. Why, now,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4465] he did Parnell was a fit man to lead us? And why, then, would we
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4469] stir up any bad blood. We all respect him now that he's dead and
[A Mother] [4818] "Ah, well! We did our best, the dear knows."
[Grace] [5224] "'ant we have a little...?"
[Grace] [5333] "We were waiting for him to come home with the money. He
[Grace] [5563] "Is this what we pay rates for?" he asked. "To feed and clothe these
[Grace] [5641] "We can meet in M'Auley's," said Mr. M'Coy. "That'll be the most
[Grace] [5644] "But we mustn't be late," said Mr. Power earnestly, "because it is
[Grace] [5647] "We can meet at half-seven," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5678] "You see, we may as well all admit we're a nice collection of
[Grace] [5803] remember Crofton saying to me when we came out----"
[Grace] [5808] Orangeman too. We went into Butler's in Moore Street--faith, was
[Grace] [5810] his very words. Kernan, he said, we worship at different altars, he
[Grace] [5819] "We both believe in----"
[Grace] [5901] "We didn't learn that, Tom," said Mr. Power, following Mr.
[Grace] [5902] M'Coy's example, "when we went to the penny-a-week school."
[Grace] [6054] and God knows we want it badly."
[Grace] [6079] "All we have to do," said Mr. Cunningham, "is to stand up with
[Grace] [6199] understood the temptations of this life. We might have had, we all
[Grace] [6200] had from time to time, our temptations: we might have, we all had,
[The Dead] [6394] "No," said Gabriel, turning to his wife, "we had quite enough of
[The Dead] [6395] that last year, hadn't we? Don't you remember, Aunt Kate, what a
[The Dead] [6397] east wind blowing in after we passed Merrion. Very jolly it was.
[The Dead] [6438] "Yes," said Mrs. Conroy. "Guttapercha things. We both have a pair
[The Dead] [6499] "And may we have some refreshment, too, Miss Morkan?"
[The Dead] [6747] "Of course, I was only joking. Come, we cross now."
[The Dead] [6776] "Well, we usually go to France or Belgium or perhaps Germany,"
[The Dead] [7015] "And besides, Aunt Kate," said Mary Jane, "we really are all
[The Dead] [7016] hungry and when we are hungry we are all very quarrelsome."
[The Dead] [7018] "And when we are thirsty we are also quarrelsome," added Mr.
[The Dead] [7021] "So that we had better go to supper," said Mary Jane, "and finish
[The Dead] [7257] "I wish we had an institution like that in our Church," said Mr.
[The Dead] [7325] "Ladies and Gentlemen, it is not the first time that we have
[The Dead] [7327] board. It is not the first time that we have been the recipients--or
[The Dead] [7347] have handed down to us and which we in turn must hand down to
[The Dead] [7359] misdirected, is, I believe, in the main sincere. But we are living in
[The Dead] [7365] it seemed to me, I must confess, that we were living in a less
[The Dead] [7368] least, that in gatherings such as this we shall still speak of them
[The Dead] [7378] youth, of changes, of absent faces that we miss here tonight. Our
[The Dead] [7380] were we to brood upon them always we could not find the heart to
[The Dead] [7381] go on bravely with our work among the living. We have all of us
[The Dead] [7386] moralising intrude upon us here tonight. Here we are gathered
[The Dead] [7388] everyday routine. We are met here as friends, in the spirit of
[The Dead] [7397] "He says we are the Three Graces, Aunt Julia," said Mary Jane.
[The Dead] [7519] "We used to have a very good horse and trap at home," said Aunt
[The Dead] [7677] break off like that when we were all in raptures listening to you."
[The Dead] [7698] "They say," said Mary Jane, "we haven't had snow like it for thirty
[The Dead] [7705] Christmas unless we have the snow on the ground."
[The Dead] [7887] "We don't want any light. We have light enough from the street.
[The Dead] [8106] a gentle boy. We used to go out together, walking, you know,