Dubliners by James Joyce
you

Dublin The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead

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Dubliners by James Joyce.
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There are 429 occurrences of the word:   you

[The Sisters] [23] queer... there was something uncanny about him. I'll tell you my
[The Sisters] [51] a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him."
[The Sisters] [63] "How do you mean, Mr. Cotter?" asked my aunt.
[The Sisters] [80] "But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr. Cotter?" she
[The Sisters] [84] impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it
[The Sisters] [230] "Oh, quite peacefully, ma'am," said Eliza. "You couldn't tell when
[The Sisters] [253] "Well, Miss Flynn, at any rate it must be a great comfort for you to
[The Sisters] [254] know that you did all you could for him. You were both very kind
[The Sisters] [283] gone to his eternal reward he won't forget you and all your
[The Sisters] [286] "Ah, poor James!" said Eliza. "He was no great trouble to us. You
[The Sisters] [293] beef-tea any me, nor you, ma'am, sending him his snuff. Ah, poor
[The Sisters] [299] "Mind you, I noticed there was something queer coming over him
[The Sisters] [323] priesthood was too much for him. And then his life was, you might
[The Sisters] [326] "Yes," said my aunt. "He was a disappointed man. You could see
[The Sisters] [351] there brought in a light for to look for him.... And what do you
[An Encounter] [405] you studied it? What have you there in your pocket?"
[An Encounter] [412] you read instead of studying your Roman History? Let me not find
[An Encounter] [415] for a drink. I'm surprised at boys like you, educated, reading such
[An Encounter] [416] stuff. I could understand it if you were ... National School boys.
[An Encounter] [417] Now, Dillon, I advise you strongly, get at your work or..."
[An Encounter] [491] you must have at least three. We revenged ourselves on Leo Dillon
[An Encounter] [577] "Ah, I can see you are a bookworm like myself. Now," he added,
[An Encounter] [593] "Tell us," said Mahony pertly to the man, "how many have you
[An Encounter] [636] "In case he asks us for our names," I said "let you be Murphy and I'll
[Araby] [755] street-singers, who sang a come-all-you about O'Donovan Rossa,
[Araby] [783] "And why can't you?" I asked.
[Araby] [795] "It's well for you," she said.
[Araby] [797] "If I go," I said, "I will bring you something."
[Araby] [849] "I'm afraid you may put off your bazaar for this night of Our Lord."
[Araby] [861] "Can't you give him the money and let him go? You've kept him
[Araby] [905] "O, but you did!"
[Araby] [921] "No, thank you."
[Eveline] [988] "Miss Hill, don't you see these ladies are waiting?"
[Two Gallants] [1413] "And where did you pick her up, Corley?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1419] you know. So we went for a walk round by the canal and she told
[Two Gallants] [1426] two bloody fine cigars--O, the real cheese, you know, that the old
[Two Gallants] [1434] But she thinks I'm a bit of class, you know."
[Two Gallants] [1475] "Is she game for that?" asked Lenehan dubiously. "You can never
[Two Gallants] [1493] "First I used to go with girls, you know," said Corley, unbosoming;
[Two Gallants] [1528] "You know you can't kid me, Corley," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1546] 'Ecod! Corley, you know how to take them," he said.
[Two Gallants] [1550] "But tell me," said Lenehan again, "are you sure you can bring it
[Two Gallants] [1551] off all right? You know it's a ticklish job. They're damn close on
[Two Gallants] [1558] "I'll pull it off," he said. "Leave it to me, can't you?"
[Two Gallants] [1595] "Are you trying to get inside me?" he asked.
[Two Gallants] [1601] you what. I'll go over and talk to her and you can pass by."
[Two Gallants] [1812] "Can't you tell us?" he said. "Did you try her?"
[The Boarding House] [1868] You needn't sham:
[The Boarding House] [1869] You know I am.
[The Boarding House] [2001] to remain free, not to marry. Once you are married you are done
[The Boarding House] [2099] "Come down, dear. Mr. Doran wants to speak to you."
[A Little Cloud] [2106] and wished him godspeed. Gallaher had got on. You could tell that
[A Little Cloud] [2121] half-moons of his nails were perfect and when he smiled you
[A Little Cloud] [2187] something in Ignatius Gallaher that impressed you in spite of
[A Little Cloud] [2196] That was Ignatius Gallaher all out; and, damn it, you couldn't but
[A Little Cloud] [2202] was no doubt about it: if you wanted to succeed you had to go
[A Little Cloud] [2203] away. You could do nothing in Dublin. As he crossed Grattan
[A Little Cloud] [2254] "Hallo, Tommy, old hero, here you are! What is it to be? What will
[A Little Cloud] [2255] you have? I'm taking whisky: better stuff than we get across the
[A Little Cloud] [2258] good fellow.... Well, and how have you been pulling along since I
[A Little Cloud] [2259] saw you last? Dear God, how old we're getting! Do you see any
[A Little Cloud] [2272] "It pulls you down," be said, "Press life. Always hurry and scurry,
[A Little Cloud] [2275] for a few days. I'm deuced glad, I can tell you, to get back to the
[A Little Cloud] [2277] better since I landed again in dear dirty Dublin.... Here you are,
[A Little Cloud] [2282] "You don't know what's good for you, my boy," said Ignatius
[A Little Cloud] [2309] "Tommy," he said, "I see you haven't changed an atom. You're the
[A Little Cloud] [2312] want to knock about a bit in the world. Have you never been
[A Little Cloud] [2320] choice. That'd do you good."
[A Little Cloud] [2322] "Have you seen Paris?"
[A Little Cloud] [2332] the flavour of his drink. "It's not so beautiful, you know. Of course,
[A Little Cloud] [2342] Bohemian cafes. Hot stuff! Not for a pious chap like you,
[A Little Cloud] [2357] in enjoying life--and don't you think they're right? If you want to
[A Little Cloud] [2358] enjoy yourself properly you must go to Paris. And, mind you,
[A Little Cloud] [2369] "Every place is immoral," he said. "Of course you do find spicy
[A Little Cloud] [2371] lively, if you like, when the cocottes begin to let themselves loose.
[A Little Cloud] [2372] You know what they are, I suppose?"
[A Little Cloud] [2378] "Ah," he said, "you may say what you like. There's no woman like
[A Little Cloud] [2385] of the other. You ask Hogan, my boy. I showed him a bit about
[A Little Cloud] [2391] "O, come on, another one won't do you any harm. What is it? The
[A Little Cloud] [2396] "Francois, the same again.... Will you smoke, Tommy?"
[A Little Cloud] [2401] "I'll tell you my opinion," said Ignatius Gallaher, emerging after
[A Little Cloud] [2421] "How dull you must find it," said Little Chandler, "after all the
[A Little Cloud] [2425] you know. And, after all, it's the old country, as they say, isn't it?
[A Little Cloud] [2426] You can't help having a certain feeling for it. That's human
[A Little Cloud] [2427] nature.... But tell me something about yourself. Hogan told me you
[A Little Cloud] [2440] "Well, Tommy," he said, "I wish you and yours every joy in life,
[A Little Cloud] [2441] old chap, and tons of money, and may you never die till I shoot
[A Little Cloud] [2442] you. And that's the wish of a sincere friend, an old friend. You
[A Little Cloud] [2459] "Bravo," he said, "I wouldn't doubt you, Tommy."
[A Little Cloud] [2464] "I hope you'll spend an evening with us," he said, "before you go
[A Little Cloud] [2465] back. My wife will be delighted to meet you. We can have a little
[A Little Cloud] [2473] "I'm awfully sorry, old man. You see I'm over here with another
[A Little Cloud] [2483] "Very well," said Little Chandler, "the next time you come we
[A Little Cloud] [2494] "Is it to be the last?" he said. "Because you know, I have an a.p."
[A Little Cloud] [2525] "Who knows?" he said, as they lifted their glasses. "When you
[A Little Cloud] [2537] "Some day you will," said Little Chandler calmly.
[A Little Cloud] [2542] "You think so?" he said.
[A Little Cloud] [2545] "like everyone else if you can find the girl."
[A Little Cloud] [2552] "If ever it occurs, you may bet your bottom dollar there'll be no
[A Little Cloud] [2558] "Why, man alive," said Ignatius Gallaher, vehemently, "do you
[A Little Cloud] [2560] the woman and the cash. You don't believe it? Well, I know it.
[A Little Cloud] [2563] You wait a while my boy. See if I don't play my cards properly.
[A Little Cloud] [2564] When I go about a thing I mean business, I tell you. You just wait."
[A Little Cloud] [2571] to one woman, you know."
[A Little Cloud] [2689] "What have you done to him?" she cried, glaring into his face.
[Counterparts] [2720] "Mr. Alleyne wants you upstairs."
[Counterparts] [2743] complain of you? May I ask you why you haven't made a copy of
[Counterparts] [2744] that contract between Bodley and Kirwan? I told you it must be
[Counterparts] [2750] what Mr. Shelley says, sir. You have always some excuse or
[Counterparts] [2751] another for shirking work. Let me tell you that if the contract is not
[Counterparts] [2753] Do you hear me now?"
[Counterparts] [2757] "Do you hear me now?... Ay and another little matter! I might as
[Counterparts] [2758] well be talking to the wall as talking to you. Understand once for
[Counterparts] [2759] all that you get a half an hour for your lunch and not an hour and a
[Counterparts] [2760] half. How many courses do you want, I'd like to know.... Do you
[Counterparts] [2778] "Eh? Are you going to stand there all day? Upon my word,
[Counterparts] [2779] Farrington, you take things easy!"
[Counterparts] [2783] "Very good, you needn't wait to see. Go downstairs and do your
[Counterparts] [2829] "Mr. Alleyne has been calling for you," said the chief clerk
[Counterparts] [2830] severely. "Where were you?"
[Counterparts] [2838] Well, you better look sharp and get a copy of our correspondence
[Counterparts] [2863] all right: you can go."
[Counterparts] [2901] "You--know--nothing. Of course you know nothing," said Mr.
[Counterparts] [2903] lady beside him, "do you take me for a fool? Do you think me an
[Counterparts] [2920] "You impertinent ruffian! You impertinent ruffian! I'll make short
[Counterparts] [2921] work of you! Wait till you see! You'll apologise to me for your
[Counterparts] [2923] telling you, or you'll apologise to me!"
[Counterparts] [2975] "So, I just looked at him--coolly, you know, and looked at her.
[Counterparts] [2976] Then I looked back at him again--taking my time, you know. 'I
[Counterparts] [2997] imitated Farrington, saying, "And here was my nabs, as cool as you
[Counterparts] [3089] "What the hell do you know about it?" said Farrington fiercely,
[Counterparts] [3090] turning on the man. "What do you put in your gab for?"
[Counterparts] [3129] "Who are you? Charlie?"
[Counterparts] [3141] "Light the lamp. What do you mean by having the place in
[Counterparts] [3146] himself: "At the chapel. At the chapel, if you please!" When the
[Counterparts] [3155] "On that fire! You let the fire out! By God, I'll teach you to do that
[Counterparts] [3161] "I'll teach you to let the fire out!" he said, rolling up his sleeve in
[Counterparts] [3170] him vigorously with the stick. "Take that, you little whelp!"
[Counterparts] [3177] for you.... I'll say a Hail Mary for you, pa, if you don't beat me....
[Clay] [3184] kitchen was spick and span: the cook said you could see yourself
[Clay] [3187] barmbracks seemed uncut; but if you went closer you would see
[Clay] [3198] "Maria, you are a veritable peace-maker!"
[Clay] [3353] bad when you knew how to take him, that he was a decent sort so
[Clay] [3354] long as you didn't rub him the wrong way. Mrs. Donnelly played
[Clay] [3425] That you loved me still the same.
[A Painful Case] [3669] A juror. "You saw the lady fall?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3838] "I'll get you a match," said the old man.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3876] done many a time before. The mother, you know, she cocks him
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3881] "To be sure it is," said the old man. "And little thanks you get for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3890] "Why don't you put him to something?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3893] school? 'I won't keep you,' I says. 'You must get a job for yourself.'
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3904] "What are you doing in the dark?" asked a voice.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3906] "Is that you, Hynes?" asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3908] "Yes. What are you doing in the dark?" said Mr. Hynes. advancing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3927] "Has he paid you yet?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3934] "O, he'll pay you. Never fear," he said.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3939] "What do you think, Jack?" said Mr. Hynes satirically to the old
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3950] "It is because Colgan's a working--man you say that? What's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3974] "Don't you know they want to present an address of welcome to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [3981] "Won't he?" said Mr. Hynes. "Wait till you see whether he will or
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4015] "Did you serve Aungier Street?" he asked Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4020] "Did you call on Grimes?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4044] going on properly I won't forget you, you may be sure.' Mean little
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4047] "What did I tell you, Mat?" said Mr. Hynes. "Tricky Dicky
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4059] "God, yes," said Mr. Henchy. "Did you never hear that? And the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4063] you mind now? That's that. That's where he first saw the light."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4068] "Thats a nice how-do-you-do," said Mr. O'Connor. "How does he
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4078] off for the present. See you later. 'Bye, 'bye."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4098] "To tell you my private and candid opinion," he said, "I think he's a
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4099] man from the other camp. He's a spy of Colgan's, if you ask me.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4101] won't suspect you. Do you twig?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4118] He's a clever chap, too, with the pen. Do you remember that thing
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4122] me," said Mr. Henchy. "Do you know what my private and candid
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4131] --you know the patriot I'm alluding to?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4135] "There's a lineal descendant of Major Sirr for you if you like! O,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4157] that you? Come in!"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4162] "Won't you come in and sit down?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4165] velvety voice. "Don't let me disturb you now! I'm just looking for
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4168] "He's round at the Black Eagle," said Mr. Henchy. "But won't you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4171] "No, no, thank you. It was just a little business matter," said Father
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4172] Keon. "Thank you, indeed."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4181] "No, no, I can see.... Thank you, indeed."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4183] "Are you right now?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4203] "Mmmyes, I believe so.... I think he's what you call black sheep.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4226] "Why didn't you remind him?" said Mr. O'Connor.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4230] little matter I was speaking to you about....' 'That'll be all right, Mr.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4238] "I think I know the little game they're at," said Mr. Henchy. "You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4239] must owe the City Fathers money nowadays if you want to be
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4240] made Lord Mayor. Then they'll make you Lord Mayor. By God!
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4242] you think? Would I do for the job?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4259] 'And how do you like your new master, Pat?' says I to him. 'You
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4261] live on the smell of an oil- rag.' And do you know what he told
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4266] "He told me: 'What do you think of a Lord Mayor of Dublin
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4288] "Won't you let us drink them first?" said Mr. Henchy.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4294] "Here, boy!" said Mr. Henchy, "will you run over to O'Farrell's and
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4306] "O, don't let that trouble you, Jack," said Mr. Henchy. "Many's the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4312] loan of him. He means well, you know, in his own tinpot way."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4318] "Would you like a drink, boy?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4320] "If you please, sir," said the boy.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4325] "What age are you?" he asked.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4350] and myself. Between ourselves, you know, Crofton (he's a decent
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4372] "Is that the way you chaps canvass," said Mr. Lyons, "and Crofton
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4376] five minutes than you two'd get in a week."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4383] you ever see this little trick?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4411] "Who did you get?" asked Mr. Lyons.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4441] means well by us. He's a jolly fine decent fellow, if you ask me,
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4450] Edward's life, you know, is not the very..."
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4453] personally. He's just an ordinary knockabout like you and me. He's
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4464] would we welcome a man like that? Do you think now after what
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4478] "Right you are, Crofton!" said Mr. Henchy fiercely. "He was the
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4502] renege him. By God, I'll say for you, Joe! No, by God, you stuck to
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4505] "0, Joe," said Mr. O'Connor suddenly. "Give us that thing you
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4506] wrote--do you remember? Have you got it on you?"
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4508] "0, ay!" said Mr. Henchy. "Give us that. Did you ever hear that.
[Ivy Day in the Committee Room] [4593] "What do you think of that, Crofton?" cried Mr. Henchy. "Isn't that
[A Mother] [4725] "Are you ready, dear?"
[A Mother] [4811] "No, thank you!"
[A Mother] [4844] "Are you in it too? "
[A Mother] [4884] "Mr. Holohan, I want to speak to you for a moment," she said.
[A Mother] [4893] "Why isn't it your business?" asked Mrs. Kearney. "Didn't you
[A Mother] [4929] "Thank you very much, Mr. Hendrick," said Mr. Holohan. you'll
[A Mother] [4930] see it in, I know. Now, won't you have a little something before
[A Mother] [4931] you go?"
[A Mother] [4979] "Have you seen Mrs. Pat Campbell this week?"
[A Mother] [5060] "I'm surprised at you, Mrs. Kearney," said Mr. Holohan. "I never
[A Mother] [5061] thought you would treat us this way."
[A Mother] [5063] "And what way did you treat me?" asked Mrs. Kearney.
[A Mother] [5070] You might have some sense of decency," said Mr. Holohan.
[A Mother] [5077] "You must speak to the secretary. It's not my business. I'm a great
[A Mother] [5080] "I thought you were a lady," said Mr. Holohan, walking away from
[A Mother] [5101] "I'm not done with you yet," she said.
[A Mother] [5103] "But I'm done with you," said Mr. Holohan.
[A Mother] [5111] You did the proper thing, Holohan," said Mr. O'Madden Burke,
[Grace] [5184] "Where do you live?"
[Grace] [5190] "Where do you live" repeated the constable.
[Grace] [5211] "No bones broken. What? Can you walk?"
[Grace] [5216] "How did you get yourself into this mess?" asked Mr. Power.
[Grace] [5220] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir," said the injured man.
[Grace] [5238] "I' 'ery 'uch o'liged to you, sir. I hope we'll 'eet again. 'y na'e is
[Grace] [5319] "O, you needn't tell me that, Mr. Power. I know you're a friend of
[Grace] [5328] offer you. But if you wait a minute I'll send round to Fogarty's, at
[Grace] [5343] "It's very kind of you to bring him home," she said.
[Grace] [5452] "It doesn't pain you now?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5486] "I'm very much obliged to you, old man," said the invalid.
[Grace] [5492] "Who were you with?" asked Mr. Cunningham.
[Grace] [5543] "It happened that you were peloothered, Tom," said Mr.
[Grace] [5548] "I suppose you squared the constable, Jack," said Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5580] "It is supposed--they say, you know--to take place in the depot
[Grace] [5582] you know, to drill. The sergeant makes them stand in a row against
[Grace] [5587] "At dinner, you know. Then he has a bloody big bowl of cabbage
[Grace] [5597] people. I needn't tell you, Martin, what kind of men they are."
[Grace] [5601] "It's like everything else in this world," he said. "You get some bad
[Grace] [5602] ones and you get some good ones."
[Grace] [5604] "O yes, you get some good ones, I admit," said Mr. Kernan,
[Grace] [5620] "And have you nothing for me, duckie?"
[Grace] [5622] "O, you! The back of my hand to you!" said Mrs. Kernan tartly.
[Grace] [5635] "On Thursday night, you said, Jack "
[Grace] [5670] "To tell you the truth, Tom, we're going to make a retreat."
[Grace] [5678] "You see, we may as well all admit we're a nice collection of
[Grace] [5691] "D'ye know what, Tom, has just occurred to me? You night join in
[Grace] [5710] "There's no mistake about it," said Mr. M'Coy, "if you want a thing
[Grace] [5711] well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit. They're the boyos
[Grace] [5712] have influence. I'll tell you a case in point...."
[Grace] [5754] "O, it's just a retreat, you know," said Mr. Cunningham. "Father
[Grace] [5755] Purdon is giving it. It's for business men, you know."
[Grace] [5761] "O, you must know him, Tom," said Mr. Cunningham stoutly.
[Grace] [5770] "Munno.... It's not exactly a sermon, you know. It's just kind of a
[Grace] [5771] friendly talk, you know, in a common-sense way."
[Grace] [5778] orator. Did you ever hear him, Tom?"
[Grace] [5788] "O, of course, nothing wrong, you know. Only sometimes, they
[Grace] [5794] his discourse now. Crofton and I were in the back of the... pit, you
[Grace] [5809] genuinely moved, tell you the God's truth--and I remember well
[Grace] [5833] "Here's a visitor for you!"
[Grace] [5859] "I wouldn't doubt you, old man. Open that, Jack, will you?"
[Grace] [5867] the age. His great idea, you know, was the union of the Latin and
[Grace] [5874] you know, as Pope, was Lux upon Lux--Light upon Light."
[Grace] [5888] "Pope Leo, you know, was a great scholar and a poet."
[Grace] [5899] "That's no joke, I can tell you."
[Grace] [5925] "Well, you know," said Mr. M'Coy, "isn't the photograph
[Grace] [5926] wonderful when you come to think of it?"
[Grace] [5939] old popes--not exactly ... you know... up to the knocker?"
[Grace] [5964] "What's that you were saying, Tom?" asked Mr. M'Coy.
[Grace] [5973] "In the sacred college, you know, of cardinals and archbishops and
[Grace] [5991] "Are you sure of that now?" asked Mr. Fogarty dubiously. "I
[Grace] [6027] "I often told you that?"
[Grace] [6040] an eye in a man's head. It was as much as to say: I have you
[Grace] [6082] "O, don't forget the candle, Tom," said Mr. M'Coy, "whatever you
[Grace] [6104] "There's a nice Catholic for you!" said his wife.
[Grace] [6169] of the mammon of iniquity so that when you die they may receive
[Grace] [6170] you into everlasting dwellings."
[The Dead] [6268] for him, "Miss Kate and Miss Julia thought you were never
[The Dead] [6310] "Tell me. Lily," he said in a friendly tone, "do you still go to
[The Dead] [6322] of you."
[The Dead] [6354] "Well, thank you, sir."
[The Dead] [6395] that last year, hadn't we? Don't you remember, Aunt Kate, what a
[The Dead] [6402] "Quite right, Gabriel, quite right," she said. "You can't be too
[The Dead] [6434] "Goloshes, Julia!" exclaimed her sister "Goodness me, don't you
[The Dead] [6435] know what goloshes are? You wear them over your... over your
[The Dead] [6462] girl like that, one you can depend on! There's that Lily, I'm sure I
[The Dead] [6470] "Now, I ask you," she said almost testily, "where is Julia going?
[The Dead] [6471] Julia! Julia! Where are you going?"
[The Dead] [6506] his moustache bristled and smiling in all his wrinkles. "You know,
[The Dead] [6540] "Well, you see, I'm like the famous Mrs. Cassidy, who is reported
[The Dead] [6562] Kerrigan, will you take Miss Power? Miss Furlong, may I get you a
[The Dead] [6575] "But I've a nice partner for you, Mr. Bartell D'Arcy, the tenor. I'll
[The Dead] [6629] "Now, then, Teddy, I'm going to fill you out a good glass of
[The Dead] [6630] lemonade just to buck you up."
[The Dead] [6704] "I have a crow to pluck with you."
[The Dead] [6717] "O, innocent Amy! I have found out that you write for The Daily
[The Dead] [6718] Express. Now, aren't you ashamed of yourself?"
[The Dead] [6723] "Well, I'm ashamed of you," said Miss Ivors frankly. "To say you'd
[The Dead] [6724] write for a paper like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton."
[The Dead] [6755] "O, Mr. Conroy, will you come for an excursion to the Aran Isles
[The Dead] [6757] splendid out in the Atlantic. You ought to come. Mr. Clancy is
[The Dead] [6764] "But you will come, won't you?" said Miss Ivors, laying her arm
[The Dead] [6771] "Well, you know, every year I go for a cycling tour with some
[The Dead] [6779] "And why do you go to France and Belgium," said Miss Ivors,
[The Dead] [6785] "And haven't you your own language to keep in touch with--
[The Dead] [6788] "Well," said Gabriel, "if it comes to that, you know, Irish is not my
[The Dead] [6796] "And haven't you your own land to visit," continued Miss Ivors,
[The Dead] [6797] "that you know nothing of, your own people, and your own
[The Dead] [6800] "0, to tell you the truth," retorted Gabriel suddenly, "I'm sick of my
[The Dead] [6846] "Gabriel. Aunt Kate wants to know won't you carve the goose as
[The Dead] [6854] "Were you dancing?" asked Gabriel.
[The Dead] [6856] "Of course I was. Didn't you see me? What row had you with
[The Dead] [6871] "You can go if you like," said Gabriel coldly.
[The Dead] [6876] "There's a nice husband for you, Mrs. Malins."
[The Dead] [6946] "I was just telling my mother," he said, "I never heard you sing so
[The Dead] [6948] Now! Would you believe that now? That's the truth. Upon my
[The Dead] [6963] "Well, Browne, if you're serious you might make a worse
[The Dead] [7031] delay you."
[The Dead] [7037] "I am afraid you didn't enjoy yourself at all," said Mary Jane
[The Dead] [7040] "Ever so much, I assure you," said Miss Ivors, "but you really must
[The Dead] [7043] "But how can you get home?" asked Mrs. Conroy.
[The Dead] [7049] "If you will allow me, Miss Ivors, I'll see you home if you are
[The Dead] [7107] "Miss Furlong, what shall I send you?" he asked. "A wing or a slice
[The Dead] [7112] "Miss Higgins, what for you?"
[The Dead] [7162] "Have you heard him?" he asked Mr. Bartell D'Arcy across the
[The Dead] [7201] any of the men you have mentioned."
[The Dead] [7203] "Maybe so," said Mr. Browne. "But I may tell you I doubt it
[The Dead] [7210] you ever heard of him."
[The Dead] [7236] enough for you because, you know, I'm all brown."
[The Dead] [7249] "And do you mean to say," asked Mr. Browne incredulously, "that
[The Dead] [7320] "But, however that may be, I can only ask you tonight to take the
[The Dead] [7322] while I endeavour to express to you in words what my feelings are
[The Dead] [7512] "It makes me feel cold to look at you two gentlemen muffled up
[The Dead] [7568] on, sir! What do you mean, sir? Johnny! Johnny! Most
[The Dead] [7604] "Do you know Trinity College?"
[The Dead] [7609] Browne, "and then we'll tell you where to go. You understand
[The Dead] [7676] "O, Mr. D'Arcy," cried Mary Jane, "it's downright mean of you to
[The Dead] [7677] break off like that when we were all in raptures listening to you."
[The Dead] [7685] "Can't you see that I'm as hoarse as a crow?" said Mr. D'Arcy
[The Dead] [7722] "Mr. D'Arcy," she said, "what is the name of that song you were
[The Dead] [7726] remember it properly. Why? Do you know it?"
[The Dead] [7731] "It's a very nice air," said Mary Jane. "I'm sorry you were not in
[The Dead] [7748] "O, good-night, Gretta, I didn't see you."
[The Dead] [7831] "They say you never cross O'Connell Bridge without seeing a
[The Dead] [7847] "A prosperous New Year to you, sir."
[The Dead] [7849] "The same to you," said Gabriel cordially.
[The Dead] [7888] And I say," he added, pointing to the candle, "you might remove
[The Dead] [7911] "You looked tired," he said.
[The Dead] [7915] "You don't feel ill or weak?"
[The Dead] [7927] "You know that poor fellow Malins?" he said quickly.
[The Dead] [7943] "When did you lend him the pound?" she asked, after a pause.
[The Dead] [7958] "You are a very generous person, Gabriel," she said.
[The Dead] [7975] "Gretta, dear, what are you thinking about?"
[The Dead] [7996] "What about the song? Why does that make you cry?"
[The Dead] [8016] "Someone you were in love with?" he asked ironically.
[The Dead] [8029] "O, then, you are in love with him?" said Gabriel.
[The Dead] [8036] "Perhaps that was why you wanted to go to Galway with that Ivors
[The Dead] [8073] "I suppose you were in love with this Michael Furey, Gretta," he
[The Dead] [8106] a gentle boy. We used to go out together, walking, you know,
[The Dead] [8128] "And did you not tell him to go back?" asked Gabriel.