Shakespeare's Sonnets by William Shakespeare
I. From fairest creatures we desire increase

Shakespeare I  II  III  IV  V  VI  VII  VIII  IX  X  XI  XII  XIII  XIV  XV  XVI  XVII  XVIII  XIX  XX  XXI  XXII  XXIII  XXIV  XXV  XXVI  XXVII  XXVIII  XXIX  XXX  XXXI  XXXII  XXXIII  XXXIV  XXXV  XXXVI  XXXVII  XXXVIII  XXXIX  XL  XLI  XLII  XLIII  XLIV  XLV  XLVI  XLVII  XLVIII  XLIX  L  LI  LII  LIII  LIV  LV  LVI  LVII  LVIII  LIX  LX  LXI  LXII  LXIII  LXIV  LXV  LXVI  LXVII  LXVIII  LXIX  LXX  LXXI  LXXII  LXXIII  LXXIV  LXXV  LXXVI  LXXVII  LXXVIII  LXXIX  LXXX  LXXXI  LXXXII  LXXXIII  LXXXIV  LXXXV  LXXXVI  LXXXVII  LXXXVIII  LXXXIX  XC  XCI  XCII  XCIII  XCIV  XCV  XCVI  XCVII  XCVIII  XCIX  C  CI  CII  CIII  CIV  CV  CVI  CVII  CVIII  CIX  CX  CXI  CXII  CXIII  CXIV  CXV  CXVI  CXVII  CXVIII  CXIX  CXX  CXXI  CXXII  CXXIII  CXXIV  CXXV  CXXVI  CXXVII  CXXVIII  CXXIX  CXXX  CXXXI  CXXXII  CXXXIII  CXXXIV  CXXXV  CXXXVI  CXXXVII  CXXXVIII  CXXXIX  CXL  CXLI  CXLII  CXLIII  CXLIV  CXLV  CXLVI  CXLVII  CXLVIII  CXLIX  CL  CLI  CLII  CLIII  CLIV 

This is a hypertextual, self-referential edition of
Shakespeare's Sonnets by William Shakespeare.
The text was prepared using the Project Gutenberg edition.

Click on any word to see its occurrences in the text;
click on line numbers to go to that line;
click on chapter names to go to that chapter;
or search using the form below.
Search terms can contain spaces and punctuation.

The concordance for Shakespeare's Sonnets ordered alphanumerically,
and listed in order of word frequency. Click here for more texts.

[1]        From fairest creatures we desire increase,
[2]        That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
[3]        But as the riper should by time decease,
[4]        His tender heir might bear his memory:
[5]        But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,
[6]        Feed'st thy light'st flame with self-substantial fuel,
[7]        Making a famine where abundance lies,
[8]        Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
[9]        Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament
[10]      And only herald to the gaudy spring,
[11]      Within thine own bud buriest thy content
[12]      And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding.
[13]        Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
[14]        To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.