Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
of

Hardy Phase the First: The Maiden
Phase the Second: Maiden no More
Phase the Third: The Rally
Phase the Fourth: The Consequence
Phase the Fifth: The Woman Pays
Phase the Sixth: The Convert
Phase the Seventh: Fulfilment

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy.
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[Phase the First: The Maiden] [8] On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [9] homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [10] Vale of Blakemore, or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [12] somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [13] smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [14] thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [15] upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [42] was on account of a discovery I made some little time ago, whilst I
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [44] Tringham, the antiquary, of Stagfoot Lane. Don't you really know,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [45] Durbeyfield, that you are the lineal representative of the ancient
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [46] and knightly family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [54] the profile of your face better. Yes, that's the d'Urberville nose
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [55] and chin--a little debased. Your ancestor was one of the twelve
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [56] knights who assisted the Lord of Estremavilla in Normandy in his
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [57] conquest of Glamorganshire. Branches of your family held manors over
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [58] all this part of England; their names appear in the Pipe Rolls in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [59] time of King Stephen. In the reign of King John one of them was rich
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [64] Second's reign you were made Knights of the Royal Oak for your
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [65] loyalty. Aye, there have been generations of Sir Johns among
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [81] died out of knowledge, and could hardly be said to be known at all.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [83] when, having been engaged in tracing the vicissitudes of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [88] "At first I resolved not to disturb you with such a useless piece of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [90] judgement sometimes. I thought you might perhaps know something of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [100] of where he came from... And where do we raise our smoke, now,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [113] "At Kingsbere-sub-Greenhill: rows and rows of you in your vaults,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [123] family consisted of numerous branches. In this county there was a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [124] seat of yours at Kingsbere, and another at Sherton, and another in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [134] "Oh--nothing, nothing; except chasten yourself with the thought of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [135] 'how are the mighty fallen.' It is a fact of some interest to the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [137] families among the cottagers of this county of almost equal lustre.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [140] "But you'll turn back and have a quart of beer wi' me on the strength
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [146] as to his discretion in retailing this curious bit of lore.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [163] Fred, I don't mind telling you that the secret is that I'm one of a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [174] recorded in history all about me. Dost know of such a place, lad,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [179] "Well, under the church of that city there lie--"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [185] Under the church of that there parish lie my ancestors--hundreds of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [186] 'em--in coats of mail and jewels, in gr't lead coffins weighing tons
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [202] his pocket, and produced a shilling, one of the chronically few that
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [207] This made a difference in the young man's estimate of the position.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [218] The boy took up the basket, and as he set out the notes of a brass
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [219] band were heard from the direction of the village.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [226] "To be sure--I'd quite forgot it in my thoughts of greater things!
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [232] while, and the faint notes of the band were the only human sounds
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [233] audible within the rim of blue hills.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [240] The village of Marlott lay amid the north-eastern undulations of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [241] beautiful Vale of Blakemore, or Blackmoor, aforesaid, an engirdled
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [246] summits of the hills that surround it--except perhaps during the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [247] droughts of summer. An unguided ramble into its recesses in bad
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [251] This fertile and sheltered tract of country, in which the fields are
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [253] bold chalk ridge that embraces the prominences of Hambledon Hill,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [256] of miles over calcareous downs and corn-lands, suddenly reaches
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [257] the verge of one of these escarpments, is surprised and delighted
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [265] this height their hedgerows appear a network of dark green threads
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [266] overspreading the paler green of the grass. The atmosphere beneath
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [268] middle distance partakes also of that hue, while the horizon beyond
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [269] is of the deepest ultramarine. Arable lands are few and limited;
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [270] with but slight exceptions the prospect is a broad rich mass of grass
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [272] the Vale of Blackmoor.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [274] The district is of historic, no less than of topographical interest.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [275] The Vale was known in former times as the Forest of White Hart, from
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [276] a curious legend of King Henry III's reign, in which the killing by
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [277] a certain Thomas de la Lynd of a beautiful white hart which the king
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [278] had run down and spared, was made the occasion of a heavy fine.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [280] densely wooded. Even now, traces of its earlier condition are to be
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [281] found in the old oak copses and irregular belts of timber that yet
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [283] many of its pastures.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [285] The forests have departed, but some old customs of their shades
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [288] the afternoon under notice, in the guise of the club revel, or
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [291] It was an interesting event to the younger inhabitants of Marlott,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [293] ceremony. Its singularity lay less in the retention of a custom of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [296] though expiring, less uncommon; but either the natural shyness of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [297] softer sex, or a sarcastic attitude on the part of male relatives,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [299] their glory and consummation. The club of Marlott alone lived to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [300] uphold the local Cerealia. It had walked for hundreds of years, if
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [301] not as benefit-club, as votive sisterhood of some sort; and it walked
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [306] before the habit of taking long views had reduced emotions to a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [307] monotonous average. Their first exhibition of themselves was in a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [308] processional march of two and two round the parish. Ideal and real
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [316] In addition to the distinction of a white frock, every woman and girl
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [318] bunch of white flowers. The peeling of the former, and the selection
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [319] of the latter, had been an operation of personal care.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [325] to be gathered and told of each anxious and experienced one, to whom
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [327] in them," than of her juvenile comrades. But let the elder be passed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [331] The young girls formed, indeed, the majority of the band, and their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [332] heads of luxuriant hair reflected in the sunshine every tone of gold,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [335] difficulty of arranging their lips in this crude exposure to public
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [341] And as each and all of them were warmed without by the sun, so each
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [345] They were all cheerful, and many of them merry.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [347] They came round by The Pure Drop Inn, and were turning out of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [348] high road to pass through a wicket-gate into the meadows, when one of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [354] A young member of the band turned her head at the exclamation.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [358] and was the only one of the white company who could boast of such
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [362] her elbows. This was the cheerful servant of that establishment,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [363] who, in her part of factotum, turned groom and ostler at times.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [391] Tess Durbeyfield at this time of her life was a mere vessel of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [394] intonation of that dialect for this district being the voicing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [398] into its definite shape, and her lower lip had a way of thrusting the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [399] middle of her top one upward, when they closed together after a word.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [401] Phases of her childhood lurked in her aspect still. As she walked
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [404] from her eyes; and even her fifth would flit over the curves of her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [413] Nothing was seen or heard further of Durbeyfield in his triumphal
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [414] chariot under the conduct of the ostleress, and the club having
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [417] hour for the close of labour drew on, the masculine inhabitants of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [421] Among these on-lookers were three young men of a superior class,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [426] high waistcoat, and thin-brimmed hat of the regulation curate; the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [427] second was the normal undergraduate; the appearance of the third and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [431] groove. That he was a desultory tentative student of something and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [432] everything might only have been predicted of him.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [435] their Whitsun holidays in a walking tour through the Vale of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [436] Blackmoor, their course being south-westerly from the town of Shaston
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [440] meaning of the dance and the white-frocked maids. The two elder of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [442] but the spectacle of a bevy of girls dancing without male partners
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [449] "I am inclined to go and have a fling with them. Why not all of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [453] of country hoydens--suppose we should be seen! Come along, or it
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [456] chapter of _A Counterblast to Agnosticism_ before we turn in, now I
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [466] "This is a thousand pities," he said gallantly, to two or three of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [470] "They've not left off work yet," answered one of the boldest.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [476] of your own sort, and no clipsing and colling at all. Now, pick and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [487] her life's battle as yet, even to the extent of attracting to her a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [488] dancing-partner over the heads of the commonest peasantry. So much
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [491] The name of the eclipsing girl, whatever it was, has not been handed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [493] of a masculine partner that evening. Yet such was the force of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [498] compelled to foot it on the masculine side of the figure.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [502] As he fell out of the dance his eyes lighted on Tess Durbeyfield,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [503] whose own large orbs wore, to tell the truth, the faintest aspect of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [508] On account of his long delay he started in a flying-run down the lane
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [511] and looked back. He could see the white figures of the girls in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [515] All of them, except, perhaps, one. This white shape stood apart
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [533] time, though she might have had plenty of partners; but ah! they did
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [535] till the rays of the sun had absorbed the young stranger's retreating
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [543] pains, and the agreeable distresses" of those girls who had been
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [544] wooed and won, what she herself was capable of in that kind. The
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [545] struggles and wrangles of the lads for her hand in a jig were an
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [549] She might have stayed even later, but the incident of her father's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [551] anxious, and wondering what had become of him she dropped away from
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [552] the dancers and bent her steps towards the end of the village at
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [557] well. They were a regular series of thumpings from the interior of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [558] the house, occasioned by the violent rocking of a cradle upon a stone
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [560] vigorous gallopade, the favourite ditty of "The Spotted Cow"--
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [569] place of the melody.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [579] The interior, in spite of the melody, struck upon the girl's senses
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [580] with an unspeakable dreariness. From the holiday gaieties of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [582] movements on the green, the flash of gentle sentiment towards the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [583] stranger--to the yellow melancholy of this one-candled spectacle,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [584] what a step! Besides the jar of contrast there came to her a chill
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [586] in these domesticities, instead of indulging herself out-of-doors.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [588] There stood her mother amid the group of children, as Tess had left
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [590] lingered on to the end of the week. Out of that tub had come the day
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [591] before--Tess felt it with a dreadful sting of remorse--the very white
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [597] the other being engaged in the aforesaid business of rocking her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [599] years, under the weight of so many children, on that flagstone floor,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [600] that they were worn nearly flat, in consequence of which a huge jerk
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [601] accompanied each swing of the cot, flinging the baby from side to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [608] the matron's elbows, and the song galloped on to the end of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [611] lover of tune. No ditty floated into Blackmoor Vale from the outer
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [614] There still faintly beamed from the woman's features something of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [615] the freshness, and even the prettiness, of her youth; rendering it
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [616] probable that the personal charms which Tess could boast of were in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [625] her thereon at any time, feeling but slightly the lack of Tess's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [626] assistance whilst her instinctive plan for relieving herself of her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [633] note had passed out of her. "I want to go and fetch your father;
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [639] English abroad and to persons of quality.)
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [645] "Had it anything to do with father's making such a mommet of himself
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [649] "That wer all a part of the larry! We've been found to be the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [651] before Oliver Grumble's time--to the days of the Pagan Turks--with
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [658] "I'm glad of that. Will it do us any good, mother?"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [661] mampus of volk of our own rank will be down here in their carriages
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [663] from Shaston, and he has been telling me the whole pedigree of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [668] Her mother gave irrelevant information by way of answer: "He called
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [672] and forefinger to the shape of the letter C, and used the other
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [689] of beehives, which must be delivered, family or no. He'll have to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [718] the edge of the type. Tess took it up, and her mother started.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [720] This going to hunt up her shiftless husband at the inn was one of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [721] Mrs Durbeyfield's still extant enjoyments in the muck and muddle of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [723] an hour or two by his side and dismiss all thought and care of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [724] children during the interval, made her happy. A sort of halo, an
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [730] appurtenances than otherwise; the incidents of daily life were not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [734] of character, and regarding him only in his ideal presentation as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [739] thatch. A curious fetishistic fear of this grimy volume on the part
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [740] of her mother prevented her ever allowing it to stay in the house all
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [742] Between the mother, with her fast-perishing lumber of superstitions,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [745] infinitely Revised Code, there was a gap of two hundred years as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [755] sister Eliza-Louisa of twelve and a half, called "'Liza-Lu," the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [756] youngest ones being put to bed. There was an interval of four years
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [757] and more between Tess and the next of the family, the two who had
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [761] a boy of three, and then the baby, who had just completed his first
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [765] ship--entirely dependent on the judgement of the two Durbeyfield
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [767] their existence. If the heads of the Durbeyfield household chose
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [772] wished for it on such hard conditions as were involved in being of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [773] the shiftless house of Durbeyfield. Some people would like to know
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [776] for speaking of "Nature's holy plan."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [779] out of the door, and took a mental journey through Marlott. The
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [802] progress; a street laid out before inches of land had value, and when
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [810] Rolliver's inn, the single alehouse at this end of the long and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [811] broken village, could only boast of an off-licence; hence, as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [812] nobody could legally drink on the premises, the amount of overt
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [815] by pieces of wire, so as to form a ledge. On this board thirsty
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [817] and threw the dregs on the dusty ground to the pattern of Polynesia,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [823] In a large bedroom upstairs, the window of which was thickly
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [826] persons, all seeking beatitude; all old inhabitants of the nearer
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [827] end of Marlott, and frequenters of this retreat. Not only did the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [829] further part of the dispersed village, render its accommodation
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [831] serious question, the quality of the liquor, confirmed the prevalent
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [832] opinion that it was better to drink with Rolliver in a corner of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [836] sitting-space for several persons gathered round three of its sides;
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [837] a couple more men had elevated themselves on a chest of drawers;
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [840] ease. The stage of mental comfort to which they had arrived at this
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [845] richness of tapestry; the brass handles of the chest of drawers were
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [847] kinship with the magnificent pillars of Solomon's temple.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [852] fingers knew the tricks of the latches well. Her ascent of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [854] the light above the last stair, encountered the gaze of all the party
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [858] at my own expense," the landlady exclaimed at the sound of footsteps,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [864] of the conclave, and turned to where her husband sat. He was humming
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [875] case any member of the Gover'ment should be passing, and take away my
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [887] rich lady out by Trantridge, on the edge o' The Chase, of the name of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [895] "There IS a lady of the name, now you mention it," said Durbeyfield.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [896] "Pa'son Tringham didn't think of that. But she's nothing beside
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [897] we--a junior branch of us, no doubt, hailing long since King Norman's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [900] While this question was being discussed neither of the pair noticed,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [902] and was awaiting an opportunity of asking them to return.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [914] Tess ought to go to this other member of our family. She'd be sure
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [927] yet. But it would certainly put her in the way of a grand marriage,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [934] Though this conversation had been private, sufficient of its import
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [935] reached the understandings of those around to suggest to them that
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [936] the Durbeyfields had weightier concerns to talk of now than common
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [941] her vamping round parish with the rest," observed one of the elderly
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [955] out of place amid the alcoholic vapours which floated here as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [965] They went home together, Tess holding one arm of her father, and Mrs
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [967] fourth of the quantity which a systematic tippler could carry to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [969] genuflections; but the weakness of Sir John's constitution made
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [970] mountains of his petty sins in this kind. On reaching the fresh
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [971] air he was sufficiently unsteady to incline the row of three at one
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [979] head of the family bursting suddenly into his former refrain as he
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [980] drew near, as if to fortify his soul at sight of the smallness of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [986] only family that was of 'count in wold days. Look at the Anktells,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [989] Thank God, I was never of no family, and have nothing to be ashamed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [990] of in that way!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [997] own mind at the moment than thoughts of her ancestry--"I am afraid
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1008] by bad roads over a distance of between twenty and thirty miles, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1009] the horse and waggon being of the slowest. At half-past one Mrs
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1025] perhaps, would go? One of them who were so much after dancing with
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1030] of! I think _I_ could go if Abraham could go with me to kip me
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1034] aroused from his deep sleep in a corner of the same apartment, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1045] of candle-ends into the lantern, hung the latter to the off-side of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1047] first during the uphill parts of the way, in order not to overload
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1048] an animal of so little vigour. To cheer themselves as well as they
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1052] sort of trance so far), began to talk of the strange shapes assumed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1053] by the various dark objects against the sky; of this tree that looked
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1054] like a raging tiger springing from a lair; of that which resembled a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1057] When they had passed the little town of Stourcastle, dumbly somnolent
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1062] fairly level for some distance onward. They mounted in front of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1083] father. There's a rich lady of our family out at Trantridge, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1085] the way of marrying a gentleman."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1088] silence. Abraham talked on, rather for the pleasure of utterance
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1089] than for audition, so that his sister's abstraction was of no
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1093] wisps of human life. He asked how far away those twinklers were,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1094] and whether God was on the other side of them. But ever and anon
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1096] even more deeply than the wonders of creation. If Tess were made
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1113] apples on our stubbard-tree. Most of them splendid and sound--a few
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1121] were so many more of 'em!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1126] impressed, on reconsideration of this rare information. "How would
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1136] "O Aby, don't--don't talk of that any more!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1139] skilful in the management of a horse, but she thought that she could
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1140] take upon herself the entire conduct of the load for the present and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1142] sort of nest in front of the hives, in such a manner that he could
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1147] movements of any sort. With no longer a companion to distract her,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1149] against the hives. The mute procession past her shoulders of trees
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1151] the occasional heave of the wind became the sigh of some immense sad
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1155] Then, examining the mesh of events in her own life, she seemed to see
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1156] the vanity of her father's pride; the gentlemanly suitor awaiting
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1165] ever heard in her life, came from the front, followed by a shout of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1177] and unlighted equipage. The pointed shaft of the cart had entered
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1178] the breast of the unhappy Prince like a sword, and from the wound his
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1189] unharnessing the hot form of Prince. But he was already dead, and,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1201] Tess showed hers, still whiter. The huge pool of blood in front of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1202] her was already assuming the iridescence of coagulation; and when the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1214] When Abraham realized all, the furrows of fifty years were
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1225] driver of the mail-car had been as good as his word. A farmer's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1227] harnessed to the waggon of beehives in the place of Prince, and the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1230] The evening of the same day saw the empty waggon reach again the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1231] spot of the accident. Prince had lain there in the ditch since the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1232] morning; but the place of the blood-pool was still visible in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1233] middle of the road, though scratched and scraped over by passing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1234] vehicles. All that was left of Prince was now hoisted into the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1240] could think. It was a relief to her tongue to find from the faces of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1241] her parents that they already knew of their loss, though this did not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1245] But the very shiftlessness of the household rendered the misfortune
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1249] there was nothing of the red wrath that would have burnt upon the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1254] very few shillings for Prince's carcase because of his decrepitude,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1275] regarded herself in the light of a murderess.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1286] not be relied on to coincide with the hours of requirement; and,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1287] having been unaccustomed to the regular toil of the day-labourer,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1292] of it; and then her mother broached her scheme.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1306] there's more in it than you know of. I've heard what I've heard,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1309] The oppressive sense of the harm she had done led Tess to be more
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1312] satisfaction in contemplating an enterprise of, to her, such doubtful
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1314] that this Mrs d'Urberville was a lady of unequalled virtues and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1315] charity. But Tess's pride made the part of poor relation one of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1324] strange kin," murmured he. "I'm the head of the noblest branch o'
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1340] and there took advantage of a van which twice in the week ran from
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1345] north-eastern undulations of the Vale in which she had been born, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1346] in which her life had unfolded. The Vale of Blackmoor was to her the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1348] stiles of Marlott she had looked down its length in the wondering
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1349] days of infancy, and what had been mystery to her then was not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1352] the town of Shaston standing majestically on its height; its windows
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1354] the place, only a small tract even of the Vale and its environs being
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1356] the valley. Every contour of the surrounding hills was as personal
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1357] to her as that of her relatives' faces; but for what lay beyond, her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1358] judgment was dependent on the teaching of the village school, where
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1359] she had held a leading place at the time of her leaving, a year or
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1362] In those early days she had been much loved by others of her own
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1363] sex and age, and had used to be seen about the village as one of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1364] three--all nearly of the same year--walking home from school side
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1365] by side; Tess the middle one--in a pink print pinafore, of a finely
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1369] at the knees, torn by kneeling in the roads and banks in search of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1371] like pot-hooks; the arms of the two outside girls resting round the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1372] waist of Tess; her arms on the shoulders of the two supporters.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1377] and provide for them. Her mother's intelligence was that of a happy
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1379] the eldest, to her own long family of waiters on Providence.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1386] deft-fingered it was a kind of work in which she excelled.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1388] Every day seemed to throw upon her young shoulders more of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1389] family burdens, and that Tess should be the representative of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1390] Durbeyfields at the d'Urberville mansion came as a thing of course.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1395] a hill in the direction of the district known as The Chase, on the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1396] borders of which, as she had been informed, Mrs d'Urberville's seat,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1399] out of whom the owner had to squeeze an income for himself and his
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1401] built for enjoyment pure and simple, with not an acre of troublesome
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1410] It was of recent erection--indeed almost new--and of the same rich
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1411] red colour that formed such a contrast with the evergreens of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1412] lodge. Far behind the corner of the house--which rose like a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1414] azure landscape of The Chase--a truly venerable tract of forest land,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1415] one of the few remaining woodlands in England of undoubted primaeval
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1417] where enormous yew-trees, not planted by the hand of man grew as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1420] immediate boundaries of the estate.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1423] acres of glass-houses stretched down the inclines to the copses at
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1427] as dignified as Chapels-of-Ease. On the extensive lawn stood an
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1431] on the edge of the gravel sweep. Her feet had brought her onward to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1443] find in such an old-fashioned part of the country. Parson Tringham
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1445] the only really lineal representative of the old d'Urberville family
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1447] very well, that the Stoke-d'Urbervilles were no more d'Urbervilles of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1454] to settle as a county man in the South of England, out of hail of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1455] his business district; and in doing this he felt the necessity of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1457] the smart tradesman of the past, and that would be less commonplace
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1459] British Museum the pages of works devoted to extinct, half-extinct,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1460] obscured, and ruined families appertaining to the quarter of England
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1462] looked and sounded as well as any of them: and d'Urberville
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1467] a single title above a rank of strict moderation.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1469] Of this work of imagination poor Tess and her parents were naturally
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1471] possibility of such annexations was unknown to them; who supposed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1472] that, though to be well-favoured might be the gift of fortune, a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1477] forth from the dark triangular door of the tent. It was that of a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1483] four-and-twenty. Despite the touches of barbarism in his contours,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1491] This embodiment of a d'Urberville and a namesake differed even more
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1493] She had dreamed of an aged and dignified face, the sublimation of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1495] representing in hieroglyphic the centuries of her family's and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1497] since she could not get out of it, and answered--
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1502] present representative of the spurious house; for this was Mr Alec,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1503] the only son of the lately deceased gentleman. "Cannot I answer your
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1512] Tess's sense of a certain ludicrousness in her errand was now
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1513] so strong that, notwithstanding her awe of him, and her general
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1515] much to the attraction of the swarthy Alexander.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1524] this. I came, sir, to tell you that we are of the same family as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1551] "Very kind of your mother, I'm sure. And I, for one, don't regret
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1576] of the fruit for her, handing them back to her as he stooped; and,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1577] presently, selecting a specially fine product of the "British Queen"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1588] her. When she could consume no more of the strawberries he filled
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1593] basket with others in the prodigality of his bounty. At last,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1600] he left her, soon reappearing with a basket of light luncheon, which
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1608] He watched her pretty and unconscious munching through the skeins of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1612] of her drama--one who stood fair to be the blood-red ray in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1613] spectrum of her young life. She had an attribute which amounted
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1616] luxuriance of aspect, a fulness of growth, which made her appear more
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1617] of a woman than she really was. She had inherited the feature from
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1626] the drive till they were out of sight of the house.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1633] gave particulars of Prince's death. "And I don't know what to do
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1634] for father on account of it!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1640] "I wish for no better, sir," said she with something of dignity.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1642] For a moment--only for a moment--when they were in the turning of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1645] thought better of it, and let her go.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1655] In the ill-judged execution of the well-judged plan of things the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1659] "Here!" to a body's cry of "Where?" till the hide-and-seek has become
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1661] summit of the human progress these anachronisms will be corrected by
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1662] a finer intuition, a closer interaction of the social machinery than
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1665] present case, as in millions, it was not the two halves of a perfect
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1668] crass obtuseness till the late time came. Out of which maladroit
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1694] Then she became aware of the spectacle she presented to their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1701] in looking downwards a thorn of the rose remaining in her breast
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1707] miles of pedestrian descent from that mountain-town into the vale to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1709] the house of a cottage-woman they knew, if she should feel too tired
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1733] of getting 'ee there without raising your hopes. She's going to own
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1747] husband. "Well, he spoke to his mother, of course, and she do want
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1755] about it than any 'prentice. Besides, that's only just a show of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1765] in the management of her poultry-farm, that a comfortable room would
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1774] Tess looked out of the window.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1787] one of the children danced across the room, saying, "The gentleman's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1790] Her mother hastened to explain, smiles breaking from every inch of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1792] been riding by chance in the direction of Marlott. He had wished
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1793] to know, finally, in the name of his mother, if Tess could really
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1804] "It is very good of him to think that," she murmured; "and if I was
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1827] "Well, she's made a conquest o' the younger branch of us, straight
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1832] haggler. "As the head of the family, the rest ought to come to me."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1836] her, most likely, and make a lady of her; and then she'll be what
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1865] The children, who had made use of this idea of Tess being taken up by
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1867] as a species of dolorifuge after the death of the horse, began to cry
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1870] "Tess won't go-o-o and be made a la-a-dy of!--no, she says she
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1875] Her mother chimed in to the same tune: a certain way she had of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1878] father alone preserved an attitude of neutrality.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1882] Her mother could not repress her consciousness of the nuptial vision
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1890] "I hope it is a chance for earning money. It is no other kind of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1891] chance. You had better say nothing of that silly sort about parish."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1899] informed that Mrs d'Urberville was glad of her decision, and that a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1901] of the Vale on the day after the morrow, when she must hold herself
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1910] thought of acquiring another horse for her father by an occupation
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1916] almost from the year of her birth.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1924] dawn--at the marginal minute of the dark when the grove is still
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1926] conviction that he at least knows the correct time of day, the rest
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1939] of 'ee to put your best side outward," she added.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1952] club-walking, the airy fulness of which, supplementing her enlarged
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1970] portion of Tess's person at one time, Mrs Durbeyfield hung a black
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1971] cloak outside the casement, and so made a large reflector of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1972] panes, as it is the wont of bedecking cottagers to do. After this
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1978] too much to Tess of his fancy for her, and this chance she has got.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [1985] first excitement of the dressing had passed off, a slight misgiving
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2010] honour of the occasion. "Well, I hope my young friend will like such
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2011] a comely sample of his own blood. And tell'n, Tess, that being sunk,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2028] side of Tess, holding her hand and looking at her meditatively from
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2030] just behind with the smallest; the group forming a picture of honest
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2032] They followed the way till they reached the beginning of the ascent,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2033] on the crest of which the vehicle from Trantridge was to receive her,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2034] this limit having been fixed to save the horse the labour of the last
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2036] of Shaston broke the line of the ridge. Nobody was visible in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2038] sent on before them, sitting on the handle of the barrow that
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2044] It had come--appearing suddenly from behind the forehead of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2051] vehicle shot out from a clump of trees on the summit, came round the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2052] bend of the road there, passed the luggage-cart, and halted beside
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2058] of three- or four-and-twenty, with a cigar between his teeth; wearing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2059] a dandy cap, drab jacket, breeches of the same hue, white neckcloth,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2065] down, then stared again. Could she be deceived as to the meaning of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2071] Meanwhile the muslined form of Tess could be seen standing still,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2081] behind the shoulder of the hill.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2083] Directly Tess was out of sight, and the interest of the matter as a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2086] lady!" and, lowering the corners of his lips, burst out crying. The
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2087] new point of view was infectious, and the next child did likewise,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2088] and then the next, till the whole three of them wailed loud.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2092] passively trusting to the favour of accident. However, in bed that
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2098] "Oughtn't ye to have thought of that before?"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2108] as one of the genuine stock, she ought to make her way with 'en, if
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2123] the crest of the first hill, chatting compliments to Tess as they
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2126] green valley of her birth, before, a gray country of which she knew
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2128] reached the verge of an incline down which the road stretched in a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2129] long straight descent of nearly a mile.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2133] wheels; the least irregularity of motion startled her. She began to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2139] D'Urberville looked round upon her, nipped his cigar with the tips of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2140] his large white centre-teeth, and allowed his lips to smile slowly of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2173] horse, whether of her own will or of his (the latter being the more
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2174] likely), knew so well the reckless performance expected of her that
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2179] in relation to the line of progress; the figure of the horse rising
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2183] outshone the daylight. The aspect of the straight road enlarged with
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2196] "Safe, thank God, in spite of your fooling!" said she, her face on
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2203] "Well, you need not let go your hold of me so thanklessly the moment
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2204] you feel yourself our of danger."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2209] summit of another declivity.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2215] "But when people find themselves on one of the highest points in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2233] large eyes staring at him like those of a wild animal. This dressing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2241] He drew rein, and as they slowed he was on the point of imprinting
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2242] the desired salute, when, as if hardly yet aware of her own modesty,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2257] tear beginning to roll down her face, and the corners of her mouth
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2262] kiss of mastery. No sooner had he done so than she flushed with
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2269] Tess made no reply to this remark, of which, indeed, she did not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2283] At the moment of speaking her hat had blown off into the road, their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2291] said, contemplating her over the back of the vehicle. "Now then, up
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2296] "No, sir," she said, revealing the red and ivory of her mouth as her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2313] he could think of for the trick. Turning the horse suddenly he tried
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2315] hedge. But he could not do this short of injuring her.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2317] "You ought to be ashamed of yourself for using such wicked words!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2318] cried Tess with spirit, from the top of the hedge into which she had
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2322] D'Urberville's bad temper cleared up at sight of hers; and he laughed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2331] a slow pace, they advanced towards the village of Trantridge. From
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2332] time to time d'Urberville exhibited a sort of fierce distress at
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2333] the sight of the tramping he had driven her to undertake by his
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2340] disconcert the whole scheme for the rehabilitation of her family on
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2343] A few minutes later the chimneys of The Slopes appeared in view, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2344] in a snug nook to the right the poultry-farm and cottage of Tess'
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2352] The community of fowls to which Tess had been appointed as
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2357] boughs of the parasite to the aspect of a ruined tower. The lower
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2361] and west in the churchyard. The descendants of these bygone owners
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2363] so much of their affection, had cost so much of their forefathers'
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2370] The rooms wherein dozens of infants had wailed at their nursing now
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2371] resounded with the tapping of nascent chicks. Distracted hens in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2375] while out of doors the plots that each succeeding householder had
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2384] ideas as the daughter of a professed poulterer, the door in the wall
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2395] itself she took, under her companion's direction, two of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2396] most beautiful of the Hamburghs in her arms, and followed the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2399] side that some occupant of its chambers could bend to the love of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2400] dumb creatures--feathers floating within view of the front, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2404] her back to the light, was the owner and mistress of the estate, a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2405] white-haired woman of not more than sixty, or even less, wearing a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2423] their combs, the manes of the cocks, their wings, and their claws.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2427] her face enacting a vivid pantomime of the criticisms passing in her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2434] then--her perception of each visitor being seldom at fault as she
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2437] It reminded Tess of a Confirmation, in which Mrs d'Urberville was the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2439] maid-servant the parson and curate of the parish bringing them up.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2440] At the end of the ceremony Mrs d'Urberville abruptly asked Tess,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2463] The old lady's face creased into furrows of repugnance, and she made
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2466] Thus the reception of Tess by her fancied kinswoman terminated, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2468] Mrs d'Urberville's manner was not great; for since seeing the size of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2470] that the old lady had never heard a word of the so-called kinship.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2477] In spite of the unpleasant initiation of the day before, Tess
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2478] inclined to the freedom and novelty of her new position in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2481] asked of her, so as to ascertain her chance of retaining her post.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2485] degenerated to the production of a hollow rush of wind through the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2489] could have so grown out of the art which had come by nature, till
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2490] she became aware of a movement among the ivy-boughs which cloaked
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2494] her the day before to the door of the gardener's cottage where she
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2499] faint ring of mockery). I have been watching you from over the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2508] wants you to carry on their musical education. How selfish of her!
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2520] of the wire-netting, and you can keep on the other; so you may feel
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2524] He suited the action to the word, and whistled a line of "Take, O
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2530] severity. But he persisted in his demand, and at last, to get rid of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2539] The momentary pleasure of success got the better of her; her eyes
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2543] There--I said I would not come near you; and, in spite of such
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2547] "I don't know much of her yet, sir."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2550] bullfinches. I am rather out of her books just now, but you will be
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2556] It was in the economy of this _rgime_ that Tess Durbeyfield had
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2558] typical of those which followed through many succeeding days. A
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2561] calling her his cousin when they were alone--removed much of her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2562] original shyness of him, without, however, implanting any feeling
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2563] which could engender shyness of a new and tenderer kind. But she was
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2584] the toes of a pair of boots were visible below the fringe of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2586] listener, if such there were, must have discovered her suspicion of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2589] thought better of his freak to terrify her by an ambush of that kind.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2597] code of morality. The levity of some of the younger women in and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2598] about Trantridge was marked, and was perhaps symptomatic of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2601] on the farms around was on the uselessness of saving money; and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2603] enter into calculations of great nicety to prove that parish relief
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2605] result from savings out of their wages during a whole lifetime.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2607] The chief pleasure of these philosophers lay in going every Saturday
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2609] or three miles distant; and, returning in the small hours of the next
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2610] morning, to spend Sunday in sleeping off the dyspeptic effects of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2611] curious compounds sold to them as beer by the monopolizers of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2618] of the journey afforded her more enjoyment than she had expected,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2619] the hilariousness of the others being quite contagious after her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2622] momentary threshold of womanhood, her appearance drew down upon her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2623] some sly regards from loungers in the streets of Chaseborough; hence,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2626] of their companionship homeward.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2639] She did not discover the coincidence of the market with the fair till
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2642] look about for some of the Trantridge cottagers.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2644] At first she could not find them, and she was informed that most of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2646] of a hay-trusser and peat-dealer who had transactions with their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2647] farm. He lived in an out-of-the-way nook of the townlet, and in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2658] Approaching the hay-trussers, she could hear the fiddled notes of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2659] a reel proceeding from some building in the rear; but no sound of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2660] dancing was audible--an exceptional state of things for these parts,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2663] back as far as the shades of night would allow; and nobody appearing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2668] there floated into the obscurity a mist of yellow radiance, which at
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2670] she perceived that it was a cloud of dust, lit by candles within the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2671] outhouse, whose beams upon the haze carried forward the outline of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2672] the doorway into the wide night of the garden.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2675] racing up and down to the figure of the dance, the silence of their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2677] to say, the powdery residuum from the storage of peat and other
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2678] products, the stirring of which by their turbulent feet created the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2680] _debris_ of peat and hay, mixed with the perspirations and warmth of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2681] the dancers, and forming together a sort of vegeto-human pollen, the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2684] they danced, and laughed as they coughed. Of the rushing couples
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2687] of Pans whirling a multiplicity of Syrinxes; Lotis attempting to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2692] themselves into the homely personalities of her own next-door
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2696] Some Sileni of the throng sat on benches and hay-trusses by the wall;
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2697] and one of them recognized her.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2705] "But when be any of you going home?" asked Tess with some anxiety.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2709] She waited. The reel drew to a close, and some of the party were in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2710] the mind of starting. But others would not, and another dance was
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2713] long, it was necessary to wait longer; on account of the fair the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2714] roads were dotted with roving characters of possibly ill intent; and,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2715] though not fearful of measurable dangers, she feared the unknown.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2720] upon his head that the brim encircled it like the nimbus of a saint.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2726] pillar of cloud now and then varied the air by playing on the wrong
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2727] side of the bridge or with the back of the bow. But it did not
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2732] choice had not as yet been arrived at by one or other of the pair,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2735] of the universe, and matter but an adventitious intrusion likely to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2740] progress, came toppling over the obstacle. An inner cloud of dust
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2741] rose around the prostrate figures amid the general one of the room,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2742] in which a twitching entanglement of arms and legs was discernible.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2745] in female accents from the human heap--those of the unhappy partner
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2746] of the man whose clumsiness had caused the mishap; she happened
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2750] later lives, to avoid making odd lots of the single people between
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2753] A loud laugh from behind Tess's back, in the shade of the garden,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2755] the red coal of a cigar: Alec d'Urberville was standing there alone.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2771] mistrust of him, and, despite their tardiness, she preferred to walk
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2779] He had not put himself forward into the light, but some of them
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2781] consideration of how the time was flying. As soon as he had re-lit
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2790] to-night by the light of the moon.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2795] freely; some of the more careless women also were wandering in their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2796] gait--to wit, a dark virago, Car Darch, dubbed Queen of Spades, till
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2797] lately a favourite of d'Urberville's; Nancy, her sister, nicknamed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2798] the Queen of Diamonds; and the young married woman who had already
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2802] soaring along in a supporting medium, possessed of original and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2804] an organism of which all the parts harmoniously and joyously
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2808] Tess, however, had undergone such painful experiences of this kind in
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2809] her father's house that the discovery of their condition spoilt the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2817] This leading pedestrian was Car the Queen of Spades, who carried a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2820] Car had placed it for convenience of porterage on the top of her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2825] one of the group suddenly.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2828] back of her head a kind of rope could be seen descending to some
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2833] No; it was not her hair: it was a black stream of something oozing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2835] still rays of the moon.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2840] sweet stuff. Honey she had in plenty out of her own hives, but
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2842] a treat of surprise. Hastily lowering the basket the dark girl found
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2845] By this time there had arisen a shout of laughter at the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2846] extraordinary appearance of Car's back, which irritated the dark
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2847] queen into getting rid of the disfigurement by the first sudden means
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2848] available, and independently of the help of the scoffers. She rushed
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2856] convulsions at the spectacle of Car. Our heroine, who had hitherto
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2861] queen hear the soberer richer note of Tess among those of the other
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2862] work-people than a long-smouldering sense of rivalry inflamed her to
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2863] madness. She sprang to her feet and closely faced the object of her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2873] bit! I'm as good as two of such! Look here--here's at 'ee!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2875] To Tess's horror the dark queen began stripping off the bodice of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2876] her gown--which for the added reason of its ridiculed condition she
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2877] was only too glad to be free of--till she had bared her plump neck,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2880] possession of the faultless rotundities of a lusty country-girl.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2884] if I had know you was of that sort, I wouldn't have so let myself
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2887] The rather too inclusive speech brought down a torrent of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2889] particularly from the Queen of Diamonds, who having stood in the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2890] relations to d'Urberville that Car had also been suspected of, united
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2892] chimed in, with an animus which none of them would have been so
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2895] tried to make peace by defending her; but the result of that attempt
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2899] of the way and the lateness of the hour; her one object was to get
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2901] that the better among them would repent of their passion next day.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2903] off alone when a horseman emerged almost silently from the corner of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2915] of the screaming cats in a jiffy!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2917] She felt almost ready to faint, so vivid was her sense of the crisis.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2918] At almost any other moment of her life she would have refused such
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2920] before; and now the loneliness would not of itself have forced her
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2923] transformed by a spring of the foot into a triumph over them, she
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2927] revellers became aware of what had happened.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2929] The Queen of Spades forgot the stain on her bodice, and stood
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2930] beside the Queen of Diamonds and the new-married, staggering young
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2931] woman--all with a gaze of fixity in the direction in which the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2940] the arm of her fond husband.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2943] she explained laconically: "Out of the frying-pan into the fire!"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2945] Then these children of the open air, whom even excess of alcohol
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2947] and as they went there moved onward with them, around the shadow of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2948] each one's head, a circle of opalized light, formed by the moon's
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2949] rays upon the glistening sheet of dew. Each pedestrian could see
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2953] inherent part of the irradiation, and the fumes of their breathing
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2954] a component of the night's mist; and the spirit of the scene, and
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2955] of the moonlight, and of Nature, seemed harmoniously to mingle with
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2956] the spirit of wine.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [2967] was precarious enough despite her tight hold of him. She begged him
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3012] morning of that week, had been on foot the whole of each day, and on
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3016] a mile of the way home, and had undergone the excitement of the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3017] quarrel, till, with the slow progress of their steed, it was now
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3019] drowsiness. In that moment of oblivion her head sank gently against
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3026] This immediately put her on the defensive, and with one of those
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3027] sudden impulses of reprisal to which she was liable she gave him a
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3052] She drew a quick pettish breath of objection, writhing uneasily on
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3067] "A wood--what wood? Surely we are quite out of the road?"
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3069] "A bit of The Chase--the oldest wood in England. It is a lovely
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3073] real dismay, and getting rid of his arm by pulling open his fingers
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3074] one by one, though at the risk of slipping off herself. "Just when
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3087] here to this out-of-the-way place, I feel myself responsible for
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3104] creature. "He's had enough of it for to-night."
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3107] bough, and made a sort of couch or nest for her in the deep mass of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3120] "O how very good of you that is!" she exclaimed, with a painful sense
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3121] of the awkwardness of having to thank him just then.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3135] The sudden vision of his passion for herself as a factor in this
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3157] webs of vapour which by this time formed veils between the trees.
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3158] She could hear the rustling of the branches as he ascended the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3160] of a bird, and finally died away. With the setting of the moon the
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3165] his genuine doubt as to the quarter of The Chase they were in. He
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3171] hill into the adjoining vale brought him to the fence of a highway
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3172] whose contours he recognized, which settled the question of their
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3174] the moon had quite gone down, and partly on account of the fog The
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3179] up and down, round and round, he at length heard a slight movement of
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3180] the horse close at hand; and the sleeve of his overcoat unexpectedly
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3195] primeval yews and oaks of The Chase, in which there poised gentle
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3198] angel? where was the providence of her simple faith? Perhaps, like
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3199] that other god of whom the ironical Tishbite spoke, he was talking,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3207] woman, the wrong woman the man, many thousand years of analytical
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3208] philosophy have failed to explain to our sense of order. One may,
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3209] indeed, admit the possibility of a retribution lurking in the present
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3210] catastrophe. Doubtless some of Tess d'Urberville's mailed ancestors
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3212] ruthlessly towards peasant girls of their time. But though to visit
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3213] the sins of the fathers upon the children may be a morality good
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3217] As Tess's own people down in those retreats are never tired of saying
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3219] lay the pity of it. An immeasurable social chasm was to divide our
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3220] heroine's personality thereafter from that previous self of hers
[Phase the First: The Maiden] [3225] END OF PHASE THE FIRST
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3248] the ridge towards which her face was set--the barrier of the vale
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3249] wherein she had of late been a stranger--which she would have to
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3252] Blakemore Vale. Even the character and accent of the two peoples
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3253] had shades of difference, despite the amalgamating effects of a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3255] place of her sojourn at Trantridge, her native village had seemed a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3262] wildly on that day in June. Tess went up the remainder of its length
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3263] without stopping, and on reaching the edge of the escarpment gazed
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3267] serpent hisses where the sweet birds sing, and her views of life had
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3287] madman, simply to drive you the rest of the distance, if you won't
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3296] stepped up, and they sat side by side. She had no fear of him now,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3297] and in the cause of her confidence her sorrow lay.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3305] in view of the clump of trees beyond which the village of Marlott
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3322] "You didn't come for love of me, that I'll swear."
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3336] upon him, her eyes flashing as the latent spirit (of which he was to
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3337] see more some day) awoke in her. "My God! I could knock you out of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3346] clothe yourself with the best, instead of in the bald plain way you
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3369] stopped just under the clump of trees. D'Urberville alighted, and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3386] given, as though she were nearly unconscious of what he did.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3391] request of a sketcher or hairdresser, and he kissed the other side,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3393] skin of the mushrooms in the fields around.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3400] of all things, a lie on this thing would do the most good to me now;
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3411] beauty against any woman of these parts, gentle or
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3427] It was still early, and though the sun's lower limb was just free of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3434] footsteps of a man; and owing to the briskness of his advance he was
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3436] long aware of his propinquity. He appeared to be an artisan of some
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3437] sort, and carried a tin pot of red paint in his hand. He asked
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3453] "All the week I work for the glory of man, and on Sunday for the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3454] glory of God. That's more real than the other--hey? I have a little
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3462] letters on the middle board of the three composing the stile, placing
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3471] Against the peaceful landscape, the pale, decaying tints of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3472] copses, the blue air of the horizon, and the lichened stile-boards,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3476] grotesque phase of a creed which had served mankind well in its time.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3487] "But," said she tremulously, "suppose your sin was not of your own
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3493] walked hundreds of miles this past summer, painting these texes on
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3494] every wall, gate, and stile the length and breadth of this district.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3495] I leave their application to the hearts of the people who read 'em."
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3502] tex for rural districts. ... Ah--there's a nice bit of blank wall up
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3520] "If you want to ask for edification on these things of moment,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3522] to-day in the parish you are going to--Mr Clare of Emminster. I'm
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3523] not of his persuasion now, but he's a good man, and he'll expound as
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3530] A plume of smoke soared up suddenly from her father's chimney, the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3531] sight of which made her heart ache. The aspect of the interior, when
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3565] you had!" continued Mrs Durbeyfield, ready to burst into tears of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3568] think of doing some good for your family instead o' thinking only of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3574] he's not, it must have been done because of his love for 'ee. And
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3586] he took of her helplessness; then, temporarily blinded by his ardent
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3600] they read novels that tell them of these tricks; but I never had the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3605] "I thought if I spoke of his fond feelings and what they might lead
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3607] wiping her eyes with her apron. "Well, we must make the best of it,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3615] The event of Tess Durbeyfield's return from the manor of her bogus
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3617] a space of a square mile. In the afternoon several young girls of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3618] Marlott, former schoolfellows and acquaintances of Tess, called to
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3626] of Trantridge, lent Tess's supposed position, by its fearsomeness, a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3639] hope of a dashing marriage, fed itself as well as it could upon
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3640] the sensation of a dashing flirtation. Upon the whole she felt
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3643] in the warmth of her responsiveness to their admiration she invited
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3647] all, their flashes and flickerings of envy, revived Tess's spirits
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3648] also; and, as the evening wore on, she caught the infection of their
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3650] she moved with something of her old bounding step, and flushed in all
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3653] At moments, in spite of thought, she would reply to their inquiries
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3654] with a manner of superiority, as if recognizing that her experiences
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3655] in the field of courtship had, indeed, been slightly enviable. But
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3656] so far was she from being, in the words of Robert South, "in love
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3659] of her momentary pride would convict her, and recall her to reserved
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3662] And the despondency of the next morning's dawn, when it was no longer
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3665] children breathing softly around her. In place of the excitement of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3671] In the course of a few weeks Tess revived sufficiently to show
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3674] and to join in the Morning Hymn. That innate love of melody, which
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3676] music a power over her which could well-nigh drag her heart out of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3679] To be as much out of observation as possible for reasons of her own,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3680] and to escape the gallantries of the young men, she set out before
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3686] in rows before her, rested three-quarters of a minute on their
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3688] and looked around. When the chants came on, one of her favourites
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3693] the grave could lead through sequences of emotion, which he alone had
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3694] felt at first, a girl like her who had never heard of his name, and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3702] The bedroom which she shared with some of the children formed her
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3704] of thatch, she watched winds, and snows, and rains, gorgeous sunsets,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3710] knew how to hit to a hair's-breadth that moment of evening when the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3711] light and the darkness are so evenly balanced that the constraint of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3712] day and the suspense of night neutralize each other, leaving absolute
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3713] mental liberty. It is then that the plight of being alive becomes
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3714] attenuated to its least possible dimensions. She had no fear of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3719] On these lonely hills and dales her quiescent glide was of a piece
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3721] became an integral part of the scene. At times her whimsical fancy
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3723] of her own story. Rather they became a part of it; for the world is
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3726] bark of the winter twigs, were formulae of bitter reproach. A wet
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3727] day was the expression of irremediable grief at her weakness in the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3728] mind of some vague ethical being whom she could not class definitely
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3729] as the God of her childhood, and could not comprehend as any other.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3731] But this encompassment of her own characterization, based on shreds
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3732] of convention, peopled by phantoms and voices antipathetic to her,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3733] was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy--a cloud of moral
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3735] that were out of harmony with the actual world, not she. Walking
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3738] looked upon herself as a figure of Guilt intruding into the haunts
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3739] of Innocence. But all the while she was making a distinction where
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3755] The sun, on account of the mist, had a curious sentient, personal
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3757] His present aspect, coupled with the lack of all human forms in the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3761] gazing down in the vigour and intentness of youth upon an earth that
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3764] His light, a little later, broke though chinks of cottage shutters,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3765] throwing stripes like red-hot pokers upon cupboards, chests of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3769] But of all ruddy things that morning the brightest were two broad
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3770] arms of painted wood, which rose from the margin of yellow cornfield
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3772] revolving Maltese cross of the reaping-machine, which had been
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3775] intensified in hue by the sunlight, imparted to them a look of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3780] circumference of the field for the first passage of the horses and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3783] Two groups, one of men and lads, the other of women, had come down
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3784] the lane just at the hour when the shadows of the eastern hedge-top
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3785] struck the west hedge midway, so that the heads of the groups were
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3790] Presently there arose from within a ticking like the love-making of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3792] of three horses and the aforesaid long rickety machine was visible
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3793] over the gate, a driver sitting upon one of the hauling horses,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3794] and an attendant on the seat of the implement. Along one side of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3795] the field the whole wain went, the arms of the mechanical reaper
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3796] revolving slowly, till it passed down the hill quite out of sight.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3797] In a minute it came up on the other side of the field at the same
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3798] equable pace; the glistening brass star in the forehead of the fore
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3802] The narrow lane of stubble encompassing the field grew wider with
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3805] inwards as into a fastness, unaware of the ephemeral nature of their
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3806] refuge, and of the doom that awaited them later in the day when,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3808] were huddled together, friends and foes, till the last few yards of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3809] upright wheat fell also under the teeth of the unerring reaper, and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3810] they were every one put to death by the sticks and stones of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3814] each heap being of the quantity for a sheaf; and upon these the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3816] of them men in print shirts, and trousers supported round their
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3818] which twinkled and bristled with sunbeams at every movement of each
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3819] wearer, as if they were a pair of eyes in the small of his back.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3821] But those of the other sex were the most interesting of this company
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3822] of binders, by reason of the charm which is acquired by woman when
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3823] she becomes part and parcel of outdoor nature, and is not merely
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3825] personality afield; a field-woman is a portion of the field; she had
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3826] somehow lost her own margin, imbibed the essence of her surrounding,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3833] tight-sleeved gown, another in a petticoat as red as the arms of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3835] or over-all--the old-established and most appropriate dress of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3838] being the most flexuous and finely-drawn figure of them all. But
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3839] her bonnet is pulled so far over her brow that none of her face is
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3841] a stray twine or two of dark brown hair which extends below the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3842] curtain of her bonnet. Perhaps one reason why she seduces casual
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3847] finished she draws a handful of ears, patting their tips with her
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3851] side, holding the corn in an embrace like that of a lover. She
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3852] brings the ends of the bond together, and kneels on the sheaf while
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3854] breeze. A bit of her naked arm is visible between the buff leather
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3855] of the gauntlet and the sleeve of her gown; and as the day wears on
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3860] face of a handsome young woman with deep dark eyes and long heavy
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3866] same, but not the same; at the present stage of her existence living
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3869] undertake outdoor work in her native village, the busiest season of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3874] The movements of the other women were more or less similar to Tess's,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3875] the whole bevy of them drawing together like dancers in a quadrille
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3876] at the completion of a sheaf by each, every one placing her sheaf on
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3877] end against those of the rest, till a shock, or "stitch" as it was
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3878] here called, of ten or a dozen was formed.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3881] before. As the hour of eleven drew near a person watching her might
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3883] to the brow of the hill, though she did not pause in her sheafing.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3884] On the verge of the hour the heads of a group of children, of ages
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3885] ranging from six to fourteen, rose over the stubbly convexity of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3888] The face of Tess flushed slightly, but still she did not pause.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3890] The eldest of the comers, a girl who wore a triangular shawl, its
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3894] took their provisions, and sat down against one of the shocks. Here
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3898] Tess Durbeyfield had been one of the last to suspend her labours.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3899] She sat down at the end of the shock, her face turned somewhat away
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3902] held the cup of ale over the top of the shock for her to drink. But
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3904] called up the big girl, her sister, and took the baby of her, who,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3905] glad to be relieved of the burden, went away to the next shock and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3911] other end of the field, some of them beginning to smoke; one, with
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3914] talk, and adjusted the disarranged knots of their hair.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3918] gloomy indifference that was almost dislike; then all of a sudden she
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3919] fell to violently kissing it some dozens of times, as if she could
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3920] never leave off, the child crying at the vehemence of an onset which
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3923] "She's fond of that there child, though she mid pretend to hate en,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3936] it should have happened to she, of all others. But 'tis always the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3938] speaker turned to one of the group who certainly was not ill-defined
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3947] almost standard woman, but for the slight incautiousness of character
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3952] wearing and wasting her palpitating heart with every engine of regret
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3961] not darkened because of her grief, nor sickened because of her pain.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3964] thought of the world's concern at her situation--was founded on an
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3966] structure of sensations, to anybody but herself. To all humankind
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3976] mother, with no experience of life except as the parent of a nameless
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3978] have taken it calmly, and found pleasure therein. Most of the misery
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3988] The harvest-men rose from the shock of corn, and stretched their
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3994] completed sheaf for the tying of the next.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3996] In the afternoon and evening the proceedings of the morning were
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3997] continued, Tess staying on till dusk with the body of harvesters.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3998] Then they all rode home in one of the largest wagons, in the company
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [3999] of a broad tarnished moon that had risen from the ground to the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4000] eastwards, its face resembling the outworn gold-leaf halo of some
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4003] of doors, though they could not refrain from mischievously throwing
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4004] in a few verses of the ballad about the maid who went to the merry
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4006] and compensations in life; and the event which had made of her a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4013] the natural side of her which knew no social law. When she reached
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4021] offence by preserving the life of the child. However, it soon grew
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4022] clear that the hour of emancipation for that little prisoner of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4025] transcended that of the child's simple loss. Her baby had not been
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4028] Tess had drifted into a frame of mind which accepted passively the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4030] burn she must, and there was an end of it. Like all village girls,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4032] studied the histories of Aholah and Aholibah, and knew the inferences
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4039] her father's sense of the antique nobility of his family was highest,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4049] middle of the night found that the baby was still worse. It was
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4053] solemn hour of one, that hour when fancy stalks outside reason, and
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4054] malignant possibilities stand rock-firm as facts. She thought of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4055] the child consigned to the nethermost corner of hell, as its double
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4056] doom for lack of baptism and lack of legitimacy; saw the arch-fiend
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4059] other quaint and curious details of torment sometimes taught the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4061] affected her imagination in the silence of the sleeping house that
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4063] with each throb of her heart.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4074] She leant against the chest of drawers, and murmured incoherent
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4082] sisters and brothers, all of whom occupied the same room. Pulling
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4096] long white nightgown, a thick cable of twisted dark hair hanging
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4097] straight down her back to her waist. The kindly dimness of the weak
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4100] wrists, and the weariness of her eyes--her high enthusiasm having
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4102] showing it as a thing of immaculate beauty, with a touch of dignity
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4104] eyes blinking and red, awaited her preparations full of a suspended
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4108] The most impressed of them said:
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4116] She had not thought of that, but a name suggested by a phrase in
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4117] the book of Genesis came into her head as she proceeded with the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4120] "SORROW, I baptize thee in the name of the Father, and of the Son,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4121] and of the Holy Ghost."
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4132] of the Cross."
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4144] of the sacrament, poured forth from the bottom of her heart the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4148] The ecstasy of faith almost apotheosized her; it set upon her face a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4149] glowing irradiation, and brought a red spot into the middle of each
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4157] doomed to be of limited brilliancy--luckily perhaps for himself,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4158] considering his beginnings. In the blue of the morning that fragile
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4167] if Providence would not ratify such an act of approximation
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4168] she, for one, did not value the kind of heaven lost by the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4172] bastard gift of shameless Nature, who respects not the social law;
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4173] a waif to whom eternal Time had been a matter of days merely, who
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4181] Nobody could tell this but the parson of the parish, and he was a
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4190] He expressed his willingness to listen, and she told the story of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4195] Having the natural feelings of a tradesman at finding that a job he
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4198] dignity of the girl, the strange tenderness in her voice, combined
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4200] him after ten years of endeavour to graft technical belief on actual
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4208] The Vicar felt himself cornered. Hearing of the baby's illness, he
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4211] father and not from Tess, he could not allow the plea of necessity
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4247] at the cost of a shilling and a pint of beer to the sexton, in that
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4248] shabby corner of God's allotment where He lets the nettles grow,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4250] and others of the conjecturally damned are laid. In spite of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4251] untoward surroundings, however, Tess bravely made a little cross of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4252] two laths and a piece of string, and having bound it with flowers,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4253] she stuck it up at the head of the grave one evening when she could
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4255] a bunch of the same flowers in a little jar of water to keep them
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4256] alive. What matter was it that on the outside of the jar the eye of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4257] mere observation noted the words "Keelwell's Marmalade"? The eye of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4258] maternal affection did not see them in its vision of higher things.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4267] further travel, and of what use is our experience to us then? Tess
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4268] Durbeyfield's experience was of this incapacitating kind. At last
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4272] the guidance of sundry gnomic texts and phrases known to her and to
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4275] feel the whole truth of golden opinions while it is possible to
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4282] sisters and brothers out of some finery which d'Urberville had given
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4288] of the year; the disastrous night of her undoing at Trantridge with
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4289] its dark background of The Chase; also the dates of the baby's birth
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4293] was yet another date, of greater importance to her than those; that
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4294] of her own death, when all these charms would have disappeared; a day
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4295] which lay sly and unseen among all the other days of the year, giving
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4297] surely there. When was it? Why did she not feel the chill of each
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4301] there would be nothing singular to their minds in the statement. Of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4306] Symbols of reflectiveness passed into her face, and a note of tragedy
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4309] was fair and arresting; her soul that of a woman whom the turbulent
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4310] experiences of the last year or two had quite failed to demoralize.
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4314] She had held so aloof of late that her trouble, never generally
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4317] had seen the collapse of her family's attempt to "claim kin"--and,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4320] obliterated her keen consciousness of it. Yet even now Tess felt the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4321] pulse of hopeful life still warm within her; she might be happy in
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4326] Was once lost always lost really true of chastity? she would ask
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4332] departure. A particularly fine spring came round, and the stir of
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4335] early May, a letter reached her from a former friend of her mother's,
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4342] probably far enough, her radius of movement and repute having been
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4343] so small. To persons of limited spheres, miles are as geographical
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4347] air-castles in the dreams and deeds of her new life. She would be
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4352] Yet such is human inconsistency that one of the interests of the
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4353] new place to her was the accidental virtues of its lying near her
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4356] for which she was bound, stood not remotely from some of the former
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4357] estates of the d'Urbervilles, near the great family vaults of her
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4360] but that the individual innocence of a humble descendant could lapse
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4362] might come of her being in her ancestral land; and some spirit within
[Phase the Second: Maiden no More] [4368] END OF PHASE THE SECOND
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4386] she started in a hired trap for the little town of Stourcastle,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4388] direction almost opposite to that of her first adventuring. On the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4389] curve of the nearest hill she looked back regretfully at Marlott and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4393] lives as heretofore, with no great diminution of pleasure in their
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4394] consciousness, although she would be far off, and they deprived of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4396] merrily as ever, without the sense of any gap left by her departure.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4397] This leaving of the younger children she had decided to be for the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4402] of highways, where she could await a carrier's van that ran to the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4403] south-west; for the railways which engirdled this interior tract of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4407] to her she accepted his offer of a seat beside him, ignoring that
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4410] remainder of the distance instead of travelling in the van by way of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4416] to reach the wide upland of heath dividing this district from the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4417] low-lying meads of a further valley in which the dairy stood that was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4418] the aim and end of her day's pilgrimage.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4420] Tess had never before visited this part of the country, and yet she
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4421] felt akin to the landscape. Not so very far to the left of her she
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4423] her in supposing to be trees marking the environs of Kingsbere--in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4424] the church of which parish the bones of her ancestors--her useless
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4428] dance they had led her; not a thing of all that had been theirs did
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4429] she retain but the old seal and spoon. "Pooh--I have as much of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4433] The journey over the intervening uplands and lowlands of Egdon,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4437] on a summit commanding the long-sought-for vale, the Valley of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4442] It was intrinsically different from the Vale of Little Dairies,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4446] instead of ten, the farmsteads were more extended, the groups of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4448] of cows stretching under her eyes from the far east to the far west
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4451] or Sallaert with burghers. The ripe hue of the red and dun kine
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4458] was more cheering. It lacked the intensely blue atmosphere of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4461] and cows of these renowned dairies, flowed not like the streams in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4463] beds of mud into which the incautious wader might sink and vanish
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4464] unawares. The Froom waters were clear as the pure River of Life
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4465] shown to the Evangelist, rapid as the shadow of a cloud, with
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4469] Either the change in the quality of the air from heavy to light, or
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4470] the sense of being amid new scenes where there were no invidious eyes
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4477] Her face had latterly changed with changing states of mind,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4489] woman of twenty, one who mentally and sentimentally had not finished
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4491] an impression that was not in time capable of transmutation.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4496] wandered over of a Sunday morning before she had eaten of the tree
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4497] of knowledge, she chanted: "O ye Sun and Moon ... O ye Stars ... ye
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4498] Green Things upon the Earth ... ye Fowls of the Air ... Beasts and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4499] Cattle ... Children of Men ... bless ye the Lord, praise Him and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4507] are the forms and forces of outdoor Nature retain in their souls far
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4508] more of the Pagan fantasy of their remote forefathers than of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4513] of having started towards a means of independent living was a part of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4515] while her father did nothing of the kind; but she resembled him in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4521] There was, it might be said, the energy of her mother's unexpended
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4522] family, as well as the natural energy of Tess's years, rekindled
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4530] Tess Durbeyfield, then, in good heart, and full of zest for life,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4531] descended the Egdon slopes lower and lower towards the dairy of her
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4535] vales now showed itself. The secret of Blackmoor was best discovered
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4543] attenuated, lay serpentining along through the midst of its former
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4546] Not quite sure of her direction, Tess stood still upon the hemmed
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4547] expanse of verdant flatness, like a fly on a billiard-table of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4548] indefinite length, and of no more consequence to the surroundings
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4549] than that fly. The sole effect of her presence upon the placid
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4550] valley so far had been to excite the mind of a solitary heron, which,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4554] Suddenly there arose from all parts of the lowland a prolonged and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4558] contagion, accompanied in some cases by the barking of a dog. It was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4559] not the expression of the valley's consciousness that beautiful Tess
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4560] had arrived, but the ordinary announcement of milking-time--half-past
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4565] background, their great bags of milk swinging under them as they
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4570] rubbed to a glossy smoothness by the flanks of infinite cows
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4571] and calves of bygone years, now passed to an oblivion almost
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4575] of which a switch moved pendulum-wise; while the sun, lowering itself
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4577] the wall. Thus it threw shadows of these obscure and homely figures
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4579] the profile of a court beauty on a palace wall; copied them as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4581] ago, or the outline of Alexander, Caesar, and the Pharaohs.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4584] stand still of their own will were milked in the middle of the yard,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4585] where many of such better behaved ones stood waiting now--all prime
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4586] milchers, such as were seldom seen out of this valley, and not always
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4588] supplied at this prime season of the year. Those of them that were
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4590] and the polished brass knobs of their horns glittered with something
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4591] of military display. Their large-veined udders hung ponderous as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4592] sandbags, the teats sticking out like the legs of a gipsy's crock;
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4602] of the dairy-house with the arrival of the cows from the meads; the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4603] maids walking in pattens, not on account of the weather, but to keep
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4604] their shoes above the mulch of the barton. Each girl sat down on
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4611] One of these was a sturdy middle-aged man--whose long white "pinner"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4612] was somewhat finer and cleaner than the wraps of the others, and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4614] master-dairyman, of whom she was in quest, his double character as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4627] The majority of dairymen have a cross manner at milking time, but it
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4630] and the rest of the family--(though this as a matter of form merely,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4631] for in reality he had not been aware of Mrs Durbeyfield's existence
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4632] till apprised of the fact by a brief business-letter about Tess).
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4636] woman of ninety that use to live nigh here, but is dead and gone long
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4637] ago, told me that a family of some such name as yours in Blackmoor
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4640] generations didn't know it. But, Lord, I took no notice of the old
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4645] Then the talk was of business only.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4660] "Well, I suppose you'll want a dish o' tay, or victuals of some sort,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4667] surprise--indeed, slight contempt--of Dairyman Crick, to whose mind
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4684] The milkers formed quite a little battalion of men and maids, the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4687] milchers under Crick's management, all told; and of the herd the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4689] from home. These were the cows that milked hardest of all; for his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4693] fail in the same way for lack of finger-grip; with the result that in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4694] course of time the cows would "go azew"--that is, dry up. It was not
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4696] with the decline of demand there came decline, and ultimately
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4697] cessation, of supply.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4700] in the barton, and not a sound interfered with the purr of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4702] to one or other of the beasts requesting her to turn round or stand
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4703] still. The only movements were those of the milkers' hands up and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4704] down, and the swing of the cows' tails. Thus they all worked on,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4706] of the valley--a level landscape compounded of old landscapes long
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4735] "Because there bain't so many of 'em," said the dairyman.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4741] to the cows when they showed signs of withholding their usual yield;
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4742] and the band of milkers at this request burst into melody--in purely
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4746] or fifteen verses of a cheerful ballad about a murderer who was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4748] flames around him, one of the male milkers said--
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4750] "I wish singing on the stoop didn't use up so much of a man's wind!
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4754] the dairyman, but she was wrong. A reply, in the shape of "Why?"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4755] came as it were out of the belly of a dun cow in the stalls; it had
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4762] Mellstock--William Dewy by name--one of the family that used to do
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4763] a good deal of business as tranters over there--Jonathan, do ye
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4765] a manner of speaking. Well, this man was a coming home along from a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4776] till a sort of a smile stole over the bull's face. But no sooner
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4778] bull would stop his smiling and lower his horns towards the seat of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4812] "Oh yes; I have no doubt of it," said the person behind the dun cow.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4815] of whom she could see but the merest patch, owing to his burying his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4816] head so persistently in the flank of the milcher. She could not
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4830] pinner and leather leggings of a dairy-farmer when milking, and his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4831] boots were clogged with the mulch of the yard; but this was all his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4835] But the details of his aspect were temporarily thrust aside by
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4844] The flood of memories brought back by this revival of an incident
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4847] But it passed away when she found no sign of remembrance in him. She
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4850] shapely moustache and beard--the latter of the palest straw colour
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4858] upon the milking of one cow.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4860] Meanwhile many of the milkmaids had said to one another of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4861] newcomer, "How pretty she is!" with something of real generosity and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4864] prettiness being an inexact definition of what struck the eye in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4871] Only two or three of the maids, Tess learnt, slept in the dairy-house
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4872] besides herself, most of the helpers going to their homes. She saw
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4873] nothing at supper-time of the superior milker who had commented on
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4874] the story, and asked no questions about him, the remainder of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4877] sleeping-cots of the other three indoor milkmaids being in the same
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4882] But one of the girls, who occupied an adjoining bed, was more wakeful
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4884] particulars of the homestead into which she had just entered. The
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4897] "Oh--I have heard of him," said her companion, now awake. "A very
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4901] last of the old Low Church sort, they tell me--for all about here be
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4907] asleep again, the words of her informant coming to her along with the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4908] smell of the cheeses in the adjoining cheeseloft, and the measured
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4909] dripping of the whey from the wrings downstairs.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4916] Angel Clare rises out of the past not altogether as a distinct
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4917] figure, but as an appreciative voice, a long regard of fixed,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4918] abstracted eyes, and a mobility of mouth somewhat too small and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4920] of the lower lip now and then; enough to do away with any inference
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4921] of indecision. Nevertheless, something nebulous, preoccupied, vague,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4924] people had said of him that he was one who might do anything if he
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4927] He was the youngest son of his father, a poor parson at the other end
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4928] of the county, and had arrived at Talbothays Dairy as a six months'
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4929] pupil, after going the round of some other farms, his object being
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4930] to acquire a practical skill in the various processes of farming,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4931] with a view either to the Colonies or the tenure of a home-farm, as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4934] His entry into the ranks of the agriculturists and breeders was a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4942] missing generation. Of these boys the aforesaid Angel, the child of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4944] though he was the single one of them whose early promise might have
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4978] "How can you think of reading it?"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4980] "How can I? Why--it is a system of philosophy. There is no more
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4984] who intend to be a minister of the Gospel!"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4997] that one of his own flesh and blood could come to this! He was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [4999] enter the Church, what was the use of sending him to Cambridge? The
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5001] of fixed ideas, a preface without a volume. He was a man not merely
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5004] out of it, but in the old and ardent sense of the Evangelical school:
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5019] of affairs," said Angel. "My whole instinct in matters of religion
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5021] Hebrews, 'the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5026] "What is the good of your mother and me economizing and stinting
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5028] for the honour and glory of God?" his father repeated.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5030] "Why, that it may be used for the honour and glory of man, father."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5033] his brothers. But the Vicar's view of that seat of learning as a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5037] wrong the pious heads of the household, who had been and were, as his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5039] this uniform plan of education for the three young men.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5044] The effects of this decisive debate were not long in showing
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5048] distinctions of rank and wealth he increasingly despised. Even the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5049] "good old family" (to use a favourite phrase of a late local worthy)
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5060] following a mundane calling in the impracticability of the spiritual
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5067] probably afford an independence without the sacrifice of what he
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5071] student of kine, and, as there were no houses near at hand in which
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5074] His room was an immense attic which ran the whole length of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5077] and selected it as his retreat. Here Clare had plenty of space, and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5095] companionship. The conventional farm-folk of his imagination--
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5101] level member of the dairyman's household seemed at the outset an
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5104] day after day, the acute sojourner became conscious of a new aspect
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5106] had taken the place of monotonousness. His host and his host's
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5109] The thought of Pascal's was brought home to him: "_A mesure qu'on a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5113] disintegrated into a number of varied fellow-creatures--beings of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5117] Cromwellian--into men who had private views of each other, as he had
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5118] of his friends; who could applaud or condemn each other, amuse or
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5119] sadden themselves by the contemplation of each other's foibles or
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5120] vices; men every one of whom walked in his own individual way the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5126] chronic melancholy which is taking hold of the civilized races with
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5127] the decline of belief in a beneficent Power. For the first time of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5137] of inanimate things.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5147] secondary light of cold blue quality which shone down the chimney,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5155] window in the form of a spiritless horse walking in a circle and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5159] reading from some book, periodical, or piece of music just come by
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5163] of neglecting the particulars of an outward scene for the general
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5164] impression. One day, however, when he had been conning one of his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5165] music-scores, and by force of imagination was hearing the tune in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5167] to the hearth. He looked at the fire of logs, with its one flame
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5174] one of those milkmaids has! I suppose it is the new one."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5186] breakfasts here) planted erect on the table, like the beginning of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5206] The general attention being drawn to her, including that of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5213] constraint of a domestic animal that perceives itself to be watched.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5215] "What a fresh and virginal daughter of Nature that milkmaid is!" he
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5220] before the necessity of taking thought had made the heavens gray. He
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5234] particular pair of hands, sometimes carrying this predilection so far
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5235] as to refuse to stand at all except to their favourite, the pail of a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5240] in the event of a milkman or maid going away from the dairy, he was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5242] reverse of the dairyman's rule, the daily selection by each damsel of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5246] Tess, like her compeers, soon discovered which of the cows had a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5247] preference for her style of manipulation, and her fingers having
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5251] this respect. Out of the whole ninety-five there were eight in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5253] Tidy, and Loud--who, though the teats of one or two were as hard as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5255] a mere touch of the fingers. Knowing, however, the dairyman's wish,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5261] chance position of the cows and her wishes in this matter, till she
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5262] felt that their order could not be the result of accident. The
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5263] dairyman's pupil had lent a hand in getting the cows together of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5265] rested against the cow, full of sly inquiry upon him.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5268] making the accusation, symptoms of a smile gently lifted her upper
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5269] lip in spite of her, so as to show the tips of her teeth, the lower
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5277] She was angry with herself afterwards, thinking that he, unaware of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5282] continue her regrets that she had disclosed to him her discovery of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5290] a positive entity rather than as the mere negation of noise. It was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5291] broken by the strumming of strings.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5296] quality like that of nudity. To speak absolutely, both instrument
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5302] The outskirt of the garden in which Tess found herself had been
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5304] juicy grass which sent up mists of pollen at a touch; and with tall
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5306] and purple hues formed a polychrome as dazzling as that of cultivated
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5307] flowers. She went stealthily as a cat through this profusion of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5312] thus she drew quite near to Clare, still unobserved of him.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5314] Tess was conscious of neither time nor space. The exaltation which
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5316] came now without any determination of hers; she undulated upon the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5317] thin notes of the second-hand harp, and their harmonies passed like
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5319] pollen seemed to be his notes made visible, and the dampness of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5320] the garden the weeping of the garden's sensibility. Though near
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5322] close for intentness, and the waves of colour mixed with the waves of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5326] the western bank of cloud; it was like a piece of day left behind
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5330] of playing, he had desultorily come round the fence, and was rambling
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5340] "Oh no, sir--not of outdoor things; especially just now when the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5347] "What of?"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5359] "Ah--so have I, very often. This hobble of being alive is rather
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5371] She thought that he meant what were the aspects of things to her, and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5376] looks?' And you seem to see numbers of to-morrows just all in a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5377] line, the first of them the biggest and clearest, the others getting
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5379] very fierce and cruel and as if they said, 'I'm coming! Beware of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5380] me! Beware of me!' ... But YOU, sir, can raise up dreams with your
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5384] had just that touch of rarity about her which might make her the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5385] envied of her housemates--shaping such sad imaginings. She was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5388] of the age--the ache of modernism. The perception arrested him less
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5391] expression, by words in _logy_ and _ism_, of sensations which men and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5400] Tess, on her part, could not understand why a man of clerical family
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5404] descended into the Valley of Humiliation, have felt with the man of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5409] It was true that he was at present out of his class. But she knew
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5414] of cattle. He would become an American or Australian Abraham,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5423] of each other's character and mood without attempting to pry into
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5427] Every day, every hour, brought to him one more little stroke of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5428] her nature, and to her one more of his. Tess was trying to lead a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5429] repressed life, but she little divined the strength of her own
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5434] discovery of the abundance of his illuminations, of the distance
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5436] altitude of his, she became quite dejected, disheartened from all
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5444] "Why do you look so woebegone all of a sudden?" he asked.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5446] "Oh, 'tis only--about my own self," she said, with a frail laugh of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5448] sense of what might have been with me! My life looks as if it had
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5449] been wasted for want of chances! When I see what you know, what you
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5451] like the poor Queen of Sheba who lived in the Bible. There is no
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5456] you to anything in the way of history, or any line of reading you
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5468] any course of study--history, for example?"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5475] "Because what's the use of learning that I am one of a long row
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5489] "Tess, fie for such bitterness!" Of course he spoke with a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5490] conventional sense of duty only, for that sort of wondering had not
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5492] unpracticed mouth and lips, he thought that such a daughter of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5495] wave-like curl of her lashes as they dropped with her bent gaze on
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5498] from her reverie, flung it and all the crowd of floral nobility
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5499] impatiently on the ground, in an ebullition of displeasure with
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5501] heart of hearts.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5503] How stupid he must think her! In an access of hunger for his good
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5504] opinion she bethought herself of what she had latterly endeavoured to
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5505] forget, so unpleasant had been its issues--the identity of her family
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5506] with that of the knightly d'Urbervilles. Barren attribute as it was,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5508] Mr Clare, as a gentleman and a student of history, would respect
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5512] she was no spurious d'Urberville, compounded of money and ambition
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5520] "Mr Clare," said the dairyman emphatically, "is one of the most
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5521] rebellest rozums you ever knowed--not a bit like the rest of his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5523] 'tis the notion of what's called a' old family. He says that it
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5524] stands to reason that old families have done their spurt of work in
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5529] Why, our little Retty Priddle here, you know, is one of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5532] his was heard of. Well, Mr Clare found this out, and spoke quite
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5541] up and shaking hands wi'en; 'I've great hopes of you;' and gave him
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5544] After hearing this caricature of Clare's opinion poor Tess was glad
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5549] d'Urberville vault and the Knight of the Conqueror whose name she
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5559] The season developed and matured. Another year's instalment of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5568] Dairyman Crick's household of maids and men lived on comfortably,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5569] placidly, even merrily. Their position was perhaps the happiest of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5572] to cramp natural feelings, and the stress of threadbare modishness
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5573] makes too little of enough.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5576] thing aimed at out of doors. Tess and Clare unconsciously studied
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5577] each other, ever balanced on the edge of a passion, yet apparently
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5578] keeping out of it. All the while they were converging, under an
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5584] sapling which had rooted down to a poisonous stratum on the spot of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5593] warming apparition which had only just acquired the attribute of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5596] philosopher's regard of an exceedingly novel, fresh, and interesting
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5597] specimen of womankind.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5600] strange and solemn interval, the twilight of the morning, in the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5604] to the lot of some one or other of them to wake the rest, the first
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5608] upon her. No sooner had the hour of three struck and whizzed,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5614] not appear till a quarter of an hour later.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5616] The gray half-tones of daybreak are not the gray half-tones of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5617] day's close, though the degree of their shade may be the same. In
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5618] the twilight of the morning, light seems active, darkness passive;
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5619] in the twilight of evening it is the darkness which is active and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5624] persons up of all the world. In these early days of her residence
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5625] here Tess did not skim, but went out of doors at once after rising,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5628] a feeling of isolation, as if they were Adam and Eve. At this
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5629] dim inceptive stage of the day Tess seemed to Clare to exhibit a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5630] dignified largeness both of disposition and physique, an almost
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5633] be walking in the open air within the boundaries of his horizon; very
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5638] together to the spot where the cows lay often made him think of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5641] companion's face, which was the focus of his eyes, rising above the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5642] mist stratum, seemed to have a sort of phosphorescence upon it. She
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5644] her face, without appearing to do so, had caught the cold gleam of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5645] day from the north-east; his own face, though he did not think of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5649] She was no longer the milkmaid, but a visionary essence of woman--a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5657] feminine; they had changed from those of a divinity who could confer
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5658] bliss to those of a being who craved it.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5661] Herons came, with a great bold noise as of opening doors and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5662] shutters, out of the boughs of a plantation which they frequented at
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5663] the side of the mead; or, if already on the spot, hardily maintained
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5666] like the turn of puppets by clockwork.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5670] in detached remnants of small extent. On the gray moisture of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5672] islands of dry herbage the size of their carcasses, in the general
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5673] sea of dew. From each island proceeded a serpentine trail, by which
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5674] the cow had rambled away to feed after getting up, at the end of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5676] she recognized them, making an intenser little fog of her own amid
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5681] a white sea, out of which the scattered trees rose like dangerous
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5685] diamonds of moisture from the mist hung, too, upon Tess's eyelashes,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5690] dairymaid only, who had to hold her own against the other women of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5698] if the London folk only knowed of thee and thy slovenly ways, they'd
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5723] put on moon-like eyes to show his sense of the situation. Even the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5732] 'n, if this sort of thing continnys!"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5736] "Conjuror Fall, t'other side of Casterbridge, that they used to call
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5757] "Jack Dollop, a 'hore's-bird of a fellow we had here as milker at one
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5761] Thursday of all days in the almanack, we was here as we mid be now,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5780] The dairyman paused, and one or two words of comment came from the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5785] of finality; though old friends knew better. The narrator went on--
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5789] Without saying a word she took hold of the winch (it was turned by
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5798] rattled round again. Well, none of us ventured to interfere; and at
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5808] It was warm, and none of them connected her withdrawal with the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5809] reminiscences of the dairyman. He went forward and opened the door
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5814] get so fagged as this at the first breath of summer weather, or we
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5815] shall be finely put to for want of 'ee by dog-days, shan't we, Mr
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5824] "'Tis coming!" cried Mrs Crick, and the attention of all was called
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5829] was done she did not care to be with the rest of them, and went out
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5830] of doors, wandering along she knew not whither. She was wretched--O
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5832] story had been rather a humorous narration than otherwise; none of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5833] them but herself seemed to see the sorrow of it; to a certainty, not
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5838] of a past friend whose friendship she had outworn.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5840] In these long June days the milkmaids, and, indeed, most of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5842] milking being so early and heavy at a time of full pails. Tess
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5846] of the vanished sun, which flushed their forms with its colour; she
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5850] Neither of her three chamber-companions had got into bed. They were
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5852] the last red rays of the west still warming their faces and necks and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5864] be of other cheeks than thine!"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5877] shade of his face came upon the wall behind, close to Izz, who was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5879] kissed the shade of his mouth; I zid her, though he didn't."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5883] A rosy spot came into the middle of Izz Huett's cheek.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5896] "So have you--so have we all," said Marian, with the dry frankness of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5909] "We shan't, either of us; which is worse still," said the eldest.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5925] "But how silly all this is!" said Izz Huett impatiently. "Of course
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5926] he won't marry any one of us, or Tess either--a gentleman's son,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5931] biggest of all. Somebody in bed hard by sighed too. Tears came into
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5932] the eyes of Retty Priddle, the pretty red-haired youngest--the last
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5933] bud of the Paridelles, so important in the county annals. They
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5935] together as before, and the triple hues of their hair mingling. But
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5943] conversation was another of the bitter pills she had been obliged to
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5944] swallow that day. Scarce the least feeling of jealousy arose in her
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5951] ghost of a chance for either of them, in a serious sense; but there
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5952] was, or had been, a chance of one or the other inspiring him with a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5953] passing fancy for her, and enjoying the pleasure of his attentions
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5956] a laughing way, what would be the use of his marrying a fine lady,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5957] and all the while ten thousand acres of Colonial pasture to feed,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5959] only sensible kind of wife for him. But whether Mr Clare had spoken
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5963] attention from other women, for the brief happiness of sunning
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5978] a wooden slice on which a lump of butter was stuck. "Yes--taste for
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5981] Several of them gathered round him; and Mr Clare tasted, Tess tasted,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5982] also the other indoor milkmaids, one or two of the milking-men, and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5983] last of all Mrs Crick, who came out from the waiting breakfast-table.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5987] realize the taste, and so divine the particular species of noxious
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [5993] a few of the cows had been admitted of late, had, in years gone by,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6002] find it seemed rather a hopeless attempt in the stretch of rich
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6004] assisting, owing to the importance of the search; the dairyman at
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6009] of the water-meads--who lived in their respective cottages.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6011] With eyes fixed upon the ground they crept slowly across a strip of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6013] when they should have finished, not a single inch of the pasture but
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6014] would have fallen under the eye of some one of them. It was a most
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6015] tedious business, not more than half a dozen shoots of garlic being
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6017] that probably one bite of it by one cow had been sufficient to season
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6027] backs in all the strength of noon.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6029] Angel Clare, who communistically stuck to his rule of taking part
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6031] of course, by accident that he walked next to Tess.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6037] As they had been discussing a score of personal matters only
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6040] crept and crept, the hem of her petticoat just touching his gaiter,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6051] stepped out of line, and began privateering about for the weed. When
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6061] Tess had moodily decided that either of these maidens would make a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6093] and cry, "Marry one of them, if you really do want a dairywoman and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6094] not a lady; and don't think of marrying me!" She followed Dairyman
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6095] Crick, and had the mournful satisfaction of seeing that Clare
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6104] Angel Clare had the honour of all the dairymaids in his keeping, and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6105] her perception of his care to avoid compromising the happiness of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6107] deemed, rightly or wrongly, the self-controlling sense of duty shown
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6108] by him, a quality which she had never expected to find in one of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6109] opposite sex, and in the absence of which more than one of the simple
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6118] The hot weather of July had crept upon them unawares, and the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6119] atmosphere of the flat vale hung heavy as an opiate over the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6132] down upon the meads, and washed some of the hay into the river; but
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6137] the lowest levels in a portion of its length, and when the girls
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6138] reached the most depressed spot they found that the result of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6139] rain had been to flood the lane over-shoe to a distance of some fifty
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6142] unconcerned; but on this day of vanity, this Sun's-day, when flesh
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6151] said Marian, from the top of the roadside bank on which they had
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6152] climbed, and were maintaining a precarious footing in the hope of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6164] the bend of the road, and presently appeared Angel Clare, advancing
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6177] Angel, in fact, rightly or wrongly (to adopt the safe phrase of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6182] distance, though they had been so occupied with their difficulties of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6185] hastened on, with a dim idea of how he could help them--one of them
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6194] upon Tess, the hindmost of the four; she, being full of suppressed
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6206] "I'll carry you through the pool--every Jill of you."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6220] They disappeared round the curve of the road, and only his sousing
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6221] footsteps and the top ribbon of Marian's bonnet told where they were.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6239] Angel Clare, to whom three-quarters of this performance was a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6240] commonplace act of kindness, now approached Izz. She quietly and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6250] troublesome of Clare's burdens. Marian had been like a sack of meal,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6251] a dead weight of plumpness under which he has literally staggered.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6252] Izz had ridden sensibly and calmly. Retty was a bunch of hysterics.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6258] the proximity of Mr Clare's breath and eyes, which she had contemned
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6259] in her companions, was intensified in herself; and as if fearful of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6280] undulating billow warmed by the sun. And all this fluff of muslin
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6285] "Do you know that I have undergone three-quarters of this labour
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6286] entirely for the sake of the fourth quarter?"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6295] the state of breathing belied. Clare stood still and inclinced his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6302] unfairly taking advantage of an accidental position; and he went no
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6303] further with it. No definite words of love had crossed their lips
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6305] he walked slowly, to make the remainder of the distance as long as
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6306] possible; but at last they came to the bend, and the rest of their
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6307] progress was in full view of the other three. The dry land was
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6311] and she could see that they had been talking of her. He hastily bade
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6312] them farewell, and splashed back along the stretch of submerged road.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6341] "I will never stand in your way, nor in the way of either of you!"
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6350] side, I don't think he will choose either of you."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6352] "I have never expected it--thought of it!" moaned Retty. "But O! I
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6359] more of his choosing her than we do."
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6373] The air of the sleeping-chamber seemed to palpitate with the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6374] hopeless passion of the girls. They writhed feverishly under the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6375] oppressiveness of an emotion thrust on them by cruel Nature's law--an
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6377] of the day had fanned the flame that was burning the inside of their
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6380] abstracted by this passion, and each was but portion of one organism
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6382] because there was no hope. Each one was a girl of fair common sense,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6384] love, or give herself airs, in the idea of outshining the others.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6385] The full recognition of the futility of their infatuation, from a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6386] social point of view; its purposeless beginning; its self-bounded
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6387] outlook; its lack of everything to justify its existence in the eye
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6388] of civilization (while lacking nothing in the eye of Nature); the one
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6391] sordid expectation of winning him as a husband would have destroyed.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6413] "O yes--'tis whispered; a young lady of his own rank, chosen by his
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6414] family; a Doctor of Divinity's daughter near his father's parish of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6418] They had heard so very little of this; yet it was enough to build up
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6419] wretched dolorous dreams upon, there in the shade of the night. They
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6420] pictured all the details of his being won round to consent, of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6421] wedding preparations, of the bride's happiness, of her dress and
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6422] veil, of her blissful home with him, when oblivion would have fallen
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6429] to her. It was a passing summer love of her face, for love's own
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6430] temporary sake--nothing more. And the thorny crown of this sad
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6433] cleverer, more beautiful than they, was in the eyes of propriety far
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6434] less worthy of him than the homelier ones whom he ignored.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6441] Amid the oozing fatness and warm ferments of the Froom Vale, at a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6442] season when the rush of juices could almost be heard below the hiss
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6443] of fertilization, it was impossible that the most fanciful love
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6448] in its wake seemed an effort on the part of Nature to match the state
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6449] of hearts at Talbothays Dairy. The air of the place, so fresh in the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6452] in a swoon. Ethiopic scorchings browned the upper slopes of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6455] heats, so was he burdened inwardly by waxing fervour of passion for
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6458] The rains having passed, the uplands were dry. The wheels of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6460] pulverized surface of the highway, and were followed by white ribands
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6461] of dust, as if they had set a thin powder-train on fire. The cows
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6467] of quadrupeds than of winged creatures. The flies in the kitchen
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6469] places, on the floors, into drawers, and over the backs of the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6475] followed the shadow of the smallest tree as it moved round the stem
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6479] On one of these afternoons four or five unmilked cows chanced to
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6480] stand apart from the general herd, behind the corner of a hedge,
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6482] above those of any other maid. When she rose from her stool under a
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6486] against her knee, went round to where they stood. Soon the sound of
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6490] of this as the dairyman himself.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6492] All the men, and some of the women, when milking, dug their foreheads
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6496] the far end of the meadow with the quiet of one lost in meditation.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6500] cut from the dun background of the cow.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6503] under his cow watching her. The stillness of her head and features
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6515] nothing to equal on the face of the earth. To a young man with the
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6516] least fire in him that little upward lift in the middle of her red
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6519] persistent iteration the old Elizabethan simile of roses filled with
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6521] no--they were not perfect. And it was the touch of the imperfect
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6525] Clare had studied the curves of those lips so many times that he
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6533] not show it by any change of position, though the curious dream-like
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6535] the rosiness of her face deepened, and then faded till only a tinge
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6536] of it was left.
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6542] mind, went quickly towards the desire of his eyes, and, kneeling down
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6551] He had been on the point of kissing that too tempting mouth, but he
[Phase the Third: The Rally] [6578] curious sigh of