Ulysses by James Joyce
HAINES

Leopold Bloom Telemachus
Nestor
Proteus
Calypso
Lotus-Eaters
Hades
Aeolus
Lestrygonians
Scylla and Charybdis
Wandering Rocks
Sirens
Cyclops
Nausicaa
Oxen of the Sun
Circe
Eumeus
Ithaca
Penelope

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Ulysses by James Joyce.
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There are 64 occurrences of the word:   HAINES

[Telemachus] [74] --How long is Haines going to stay in this tower?
[Telemachus] [235] your nose against me? Is it Haines? If he makes any noise here I'll bring
[Telemachus] [413] --Dedalus, come down, like a good mosey. Breakfast is ready. Haines is
[Telemachus] [462] --We'll be choked, Buck Mulligan said. Haines, open that door, will you?
[Telemachus] [479] ajar, welcome light and bright air entered. Haines stood at the doorway,
[Telemachus] [486] word more on that subject! Kinch, wake up! Bread, butter, honey. Haines,
[Telemachus] [501] Haines came in from the doorway and said quietly:
[Telemachus] [514] Haines sat down to pour out the tea.
[Telemachus] [525] --By Jove, it is tea, Haines said.
[Telemachus] [535] --That's folk, he said very earnestly, for your book, Haines. Five lines
[Telemachus] [582] --The islanders, Mulligan said to Haines casually, speak frequently of
[Telemachus] [627] --Is it French you are talking, sir? the old woman said to Haines.
[Telemachus] [629] Haines spoke to her again a longer speech, confidently.
[Telemachus] [636] --I am an Englishman, Haines answered.
[Telemachus] [650] Haines said to her:
[Telemachus] [665] --Pay up and look pleasant, Haines said to him, smiling.
[Telemachus] [697] --That reminds me, Haines said, rising, that I have to visit your
[Telemachus] [706] Then he said to Haines:
[Telemachus] [713] Haines from the corner where he was knotting easily a scarf about the
[Telemachus] [727] --Wait till you hear him on Hamlet, Haines.
[Telemachus] [729] --Well, I mean it, Haines said, still speaking to Stephen. I was just
[Telemachus] [734] Haines laughed and, as he took his soft grey hat from the holdfast of the
[Telemachus] [781] Stephen picked it up and put it on. Haines called to them from the
[Telemachus] [807] Haines asked:
[Telemachus] [815] They halted while Haines surveyed the tower and said at last:
[Telemachus] [822] --What is your idea of Hamlet? Haines asked Stephen.
[Telemachus] [835] --You pique my curiosity, Haines said amiably. Is it some paradox?
[Telemachus] [842] --What? Haines said, beginning to point at Stephen. He himself?
[Telemachus] [849] --We're always tired in the morning, Stephen said to Haines. And it is
[Telemachus] [856] --I mean to say, Haines explained to Stephen as they followed, this tower
[Telemachus] [864] --It's a wonderful tale, Haines said, bringing them to halt again.
[Telemachus] [912] Haines, who had been laughing guardedly, walked on beside Stephen and
[Telemachus] [921] --O, Haines said, you have heard it before?
[Telemachus] [925] --You're not a believer, are you? Haines asked. I mean, a believer in the
[Telemachus] [931] Haines stopped to take out a smooth silver case in which twinkled a green
[Telemachus] [936] Haines helped himself and snapped the case to. He put it back in his
[Telemachus] [955] --After all, Haines began ...
[Telemachus] [965] --Italian? Haines said.
[Telemachus] [971] --Italian? Haines said again. What do you mean?
[Telemachus] [976] Haines detached from his underlip some fibres of tobacco before he spoke.
[Telemachus] [1038] Buck Mulligan made way for him to scramble past and, glancing at Haines
[Telemachus] [1078] middle of the creek in two long clean strokes. Haines sat down on a
[Telemachus] [1083] --Later on, Haines said. Not on my breakfast.
[Telemachus] [1104] --We'll see you again, Haines said, turning as Stephen walked up the path
[Scylla and Charybdis] [8869] --Haines is gone, he said.
[Scylla and Charybdis] [9193] coming too. Moore asked him to bring Haines. Did you hear Miss Mitchell's
[Scylla and Charybdis] [9477] --Haines missed you, he said. Did you meet him? He'll see you after at
[Scylla and Charybdis] [9544] Haines and myself, the time himself brought it in. 'Twas murmur we did
[Scylla and Charybdis] [10221] Walk like Haines now.
[Scylla and Charybdis] [10249] playbox, Haines and I, the plumbers' hall. Our players are creating a new
[Wandering Rocks] [11972] his Panama to Haines:
[Wandering Rocks] [11979] --Is that he? Haines asked, twisting round in his seat.
[Wandering Rocks] [11988] --I'll take a MELANGE, Haines said to the waitress.
[Wandering Rocks] [11998] Haines opened his newbought book.
[Wandering Rocks] [12012] --I am sure he has an IDEE FIXE, Haines said, pinching his chin
[Wandering Rocks] [12023] --Eternal punishment, Haines said, nodding curtly. I see. I tackled him
[Wandering Rocks] [12031] --He can find no trace of hell in ancient Irish myth, Haines said, amid
[Wandering Rocks] [12043] --Seems a long way off, Haines said, thoughtfully lifting his spoon.
[Wandering Rocks] [12206] D. B. C. Buck Mulligan gaily, and Haines gravely, gazed down on the
[Oxen of the Sun] [19335] the recess appeared ... Haines! Which of us did not feel his flesh creep!
[Oxen of the Sun] [19356] unveiled. Haines was the third brother. His real name was Childs. The
[Circe] [25090] CAMP MASS. THE REVEREND MR HUGH C HAINES LOVE M. A. IN A PLAIN CASSOCK
[Circe] [25096] THE REVEREND MR HAINES LOVE: To the devil which hath made glad my young
[Circe] [25102] THE REVEREND MR HAINES LOVE: (RAISES HIGH BEHIND THE CELEBRANT'S